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From U.S. to Canada

Posted

Specializes in M/S, Travel Nursing, Pulmonary. Has 15 years experience.

So, if I wanted to go to Canada for awhile and work as a nurse (from U.S.) would I have an easier time finding a job?

What can I expect about the work environment that is different than the U.S.?

Is it hard to get the license to practice in Canada if I get citizenship?

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

It's not all that difficult. NAFTA and all that good stuff.

We're pretty unionized up here and it seems to be an issue with the Americans who come north to work.

Depending on where you would like to settle, it can get pretty cold. Today was -40C when the windchill was factored in.

You apply to the provincial colleges of RNs, they assess your education, you write CRNE and that's about it.

You have to live here for three years as a landed immigrant before you can apply for citizenship.

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC. Has 33 years experience.

As Fiona mentioned you will need to meet the college province requirements for IEN and at some stage you will need to sit and pass CRNE

Time spent out of Canada is taken into account when applying for citizenship to Canada and you must total 3 years out of 5 to qualify.

As I type this at 10.50 am in Nova Scotia the temp is -3.5 with blue skies and sun blazing but plenty of snow on the ground

eriksoln, BSN, RN

Specializes in M/S, Travel Nursing, Pulmonary. Has 15 years experience.

Yeah, I hear jobs are much easier to find in Canada right now. No good hanging around here going broke not finding work.

Multicollinearity, BSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Psych, DNP Student. Has 4 years experience.

Alberta has a tremendous need for nurses right now. Sign on bonuses can be quite significant in Alberta.

That said, I would imagine it would be easier to get a job in the United States. Immigration to another country is quite an ordeal. Also, most provinces of Canada, but not all, now require the BSN for RNs.

Edited by Multicollinearity

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

If Alberta is paying sign on bonuses they are keeping them very quiet from the existing staff. The best deal we heard about was $1500 for referring someone who was hired and lasted six months.

The mood the nurses are in, if this is true, it better be kept very quiet.

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology. Has 25 years experience.

There are no sign-on bonuses. The unions would never allow them. However there is a relocation allowance of about $5,000 (Cdn pesos) that helps with some of the costs of moving. The province may also help defray some of the costs of international assessments and immigration fees.

eriksoln, BSN, RN

Specializes in M/S, Travel Nursing, Pulmonary. Has 15 years experience.

How is the cost of living there? Someone warned me you could really go broke living there. I'm not trying to be rich or anything, but I do want to buy a house some day.

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology. Has 25 years experience.

I guess it depends on how you look at it. My spouse and I both work, he full time and me 0.7 and we're comfortable. I make more in employment income than he does but he has a small military pension. Our house is worth about $300K and we live in a nice neighbourhood. The real estate market is slumping right now and there are lots of homes on the market that are being reduced in price to sell. Our cars are a couple of years old and we do some travelling. Nothing wildly extravagant, mind you. We pay $85 a month on the budget plan to heat our house, electricity is about $110 a month and our phone/cable/internet bundle is $185 a month. Car insurance isn't horrible if you're a good driver. I drive 10 miles to work and he drives about 6; our combined gasoline expenses run around $120 a month. Health insurance is paid for through our taxes. Alberta has only the Goods and Services tax (5%) and a flat tax on income (10%); the federal government also has an income tax that is based on income bracket. I usually get a refund.

There are more expensive areas of the country, like Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary, Ottawa. And there are less expensive areas, not only rural but urban as well. It's all about what you want.

Multicollinearity, BSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Psych, DNP Student. Has 4 years experience.

Hmm. Sounds like my Canadian RN relative has the province wrong, regarding the sign on bonus. Thank you all for the correct info.

to whom it may concern:

May I refer a situation? My US immigrant petition was recently approved and I'm still on my packet 2; my agency told me that I can work anywhere I want as long as I won't apply as an immigrant;

I am tempted to grab a cousin's offer for an immigration to Canada complete with job and a faster deployment.

Practically, my choice is Canada since my cousin is near me & the time element is better plus I could easily get my family with me but I guess I'd be legally liable if I'll do that. Sigh!! I really dunno what to do I'm confused?

Edited by ziggz
to correct my viewpoint

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC. Has 33 years experience.

to whom it may concern:

May I refer a situation? My US immigrant petition was recently approved and I'm still on my packet 2; my agency told me that I can work anywhere I want as long as I won't apply as an immigrant;

I am tempted to grab a cousin's offer for an immigration to Canada complete with job and a faster deployment.

Practically, my choice is Canada since my cousin is near me & the time element is better plus I could easily get my family with me but I guess I'd be legally liable if I'll do that. Sigh!! I really dunno what to do I'm confused?

You need to apply to the province you want to work in, be assessed and meet their requirements for IEN. Looking at approx 12 months process. Plenty of threads on the process for Canada suggest a good read

Dear Silverdragon102,

Thanks! I guess since I signed my contract already I ain't got a choice really but to apply in Canada as a contract worker at least and wait for the forthcoming packets instead. Might as well try it..

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC. Has 33 years experience.

For Canada most apply for a temp work permit (TWP) but be aware max period it is issues for is 3 years and have to reapply once your 3 years are nearly up. Retrogression may take longer

Sigh! it's a tough decision but i hope nothing's wrong if I apply as immigrant... Only God knows.. Well I guess it's safer to say try both ways first then here goes the saying..." let's just cross the bridge when we get there.."

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