New Grad RN and loving it!

  1. I'm currently working as a new grad RN on a Telemetry floor, and I'm loving it. I worked at the same hospital as an LVN which I think has helped make the transition go pretty smoothly. I almost went to a different hospital that offered me a position in a new grad ER residency. I REALLY wanted to get some ER experience, but they were requiring the nurse residents to sign a 2 year contract. I ended up choosing tele because the pay and benefits are a lot better, there is no contract, and I felt that I would learn a lot of information that would be relevant to my desired nursing specialty: ICU (not to say I wouldn't learn a lot in an ER).

    Anyways, I'm actually enjoying learning and interpreting rhythms, and I already felt comfortable working on a floor, so it's a perfect fit. Admittedly, I sometimes wonder how I would have been as an inner city ER nurse. ER nurses seem to inherently be "bada**es," and I think I would have thrived. Oh well though, I'm happy with my decision, and I'm learning a lot (not as much as I'd like though).

    I just thought I would post this to deviate from all of the negative new grad posts. My suggestion to LVN/LPNs is GET YOUR RN if your circumstances permit it! You will be happy. I don't dread going into work anymore. My advice to new grads is: Hang in there. You will find a job!

    My advice to RNs is: Use your LVN/LPN. Don't abuse your LVN/LPN.
    Last edit by ProgressiveThinking on Apr 21, '12
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    About ProgressiveThinking

    Joined: Aug '07; Posts: 346; Likes: 307

    5 Comments

  3. by   OnlybyHisgraceRN
    Quote from ProgressiveThinking
    I'm currently working as a new grad RN on a Telemetry floor, and I'm loving it. I worked at the same hospital as an LVN which I think has helped make the transition go pretty smoothly. I almost went to a different hospital that offered me a position in a new grad ER residency. I REALLY wanted to get some ER experience, but they were requiring the nurse residents to sign a 2 year contract. I ended up choosing tele because the pay and benefits are a lot better, there is no contract, and I felt that I would learn a lot of information that would be relevant to my desired nursing specialty: ICU (not to say I wouldn't learn a lot in an ER).

    Anyways, I'm actually enjoying learning and interpreting rhythms, and I already felt comfortable working on a floor, so it's a perfect fit. Admittedly, I sometimes wonder how I would have been as an inner city ER nurse. ER nurses seem to inherently be "bada**es," and I think I would have thrived. Oh well though, I'm happy with my decision, and I'm learning a lot (not as much as I'd like though).

    I just thought I would post this to deviate from all of the negative new grad posts. My suggestion to LVN/LPNs is GET YOUR RN if your circumstances permit it! You will be happy. I don't dread going into work anymore. My advice to new grads is: Hang in there. You will find a job!

    My advice to RNs is: Use your LVN/LPN. Don't abuse your LVN/LPN.
    Congrats.

    Now my advice to you is: Don't refer to LPNs as if RNs own them. LPNs are not "yours" neither are CNAs. LPNs have their own license and accountability.

    From a LPN to RN.
  4. by   not.done.yet
    I too am adjusting well. I landed on an ICU stepdown unit and we have a great team full of people who enjoy teaching and have positive attitudes. There is minimal drama, lots of focus on good, safe nursing practice and lots of people who help one another out. Tomorrow night is my first shift flying solo and I am actually nervous about the fact that I realize I am ready. I know I will still have tons of questions and lots to learn, but I also know I am on a floor where I will have all the help I need as I grow my way into this. Given how many people have posted about having such a hard time, it makes me afraid I am missing something or too cocky to not be more overwhelmed and terrified.

    It is tough, but it doesn't suck for me the way some folks have had it. All in all I think i have gotten really lucky from what I have read here. But this makes two of us so maybe it isn't horrible everywhere.
  5. by   Altra
    It's definitely not horrible everywhere. Difficult, yes, but not horrible. In this first year it will get both easier and harder ... that might not make sense to you right now, but it will.

    Glad to hear from those who are thriving.
  6. by   tnbutterfly
    Moved to First Year After Nursing Licensure.

    Hopefully more new grads will read your encouraging post here.
  7. by   Epic_RN
    I love my job, my unit, my coworkers. I'm still in orientation but am progressively taking in more and more of the full load with my patients. My only complaint is that I can't work overtime yet -- I'd love to pick up another shift a week! Who knew I'd love ortho so much?

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