First day of CNA clinical - Elder abuse?

Posted

You are reading page 4 of First day of CNA clinical - Elder abuse?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

fuzzywuzzy

fuzzywuzzy, CNA

Specializes in LTC. Has 3 years experience. 1,816 Posts

Reading the update, you have to wonder where the State was with all this going on.

When I worked in a LTC facility the State would be breathing down our necks at the slightest hint of neglect. Maybe the families play a role. The facility I worked at was one of the best in the state and had a long waiting list, so the families expected a lot. Many of them seemed to regard the facility as a five star hotel and expected what was almost one on one care.

I guess there are also facilities where the poor and indigent get dumped, or families dump elderly people they want to forget about. Its kind of sad when investigators are spending all their time at expensive high end facilities because those are the places where family expect perfection and will report the facility because someone didnt get their HS snack at exactly the right time, while the really nasty dangerous nursing homes are largely left alone and few people bother reporting them.

Maybe that's why I had such a hard time believing this story. I work in what basically amounts to a 5-star hotel where there is drama if you put the wrong color socks on someone, and yes, families expect one-on-one care, as well as constant service for themselves too. I have seen things happen where a CNA tells a family member it will be a few minutes before they can get their 3rd cup of coffee (for them, not the resident!) because a bunch of people need to go to the bathroom first, and next thing you know the family is complaining that the CNA was "rude" and told them they couldn't have a drink. Minor things get exaggerated into "abuse" and the administration's excuse for constantly browbeating us over everything is "the state, the state." I cannot imagine how any facility would get away with 90% of what the OP said because our bosses are on us like white on rice for EVERY. LITTLE. THING.

yousoldtheworld

yousoldtheworld

Has 5 years experience. 1,196 Posts

Maybe that's why I had such a hard time believing this story. I work in what basically amounts to a 5-star hotel where there is drama if you put the wrong color socks on someone, and yes, families expect one-on-one care, as well as constant service for themselves too. I have seen things happen where a CNA tells a family member it will be a few minutes before they can get their 3rd cup of coffee (for them, not the resident!) because a bunch of people need to go to the bathroom first, and next thing you know the family is complaining that the CNA was "rude" and told them they couldn't have a drink. Minor things get exaggerated into "abuse" and the administration's excuse for constantly browbeating us over everything is "the state, the state." I cannot imagine how any facility would get away with 90% of what the OP said because our bosses are on us like white on rice for EVERY. LITTLE. THING.

I have worked in both a 5 star facility and a bottom of the barrel facility that took the residents no one else would take (abusive residents and those with no money/family) and the staff that no one else would take, and I can attest to the fact that standards and accountability are vastly different between the two (at least in my state!)

The first was much like your facility sounds - demanding residents and families, and you better meet their silly demands on time and as they want OR ELSE. And the other...well, I'll just say that I am NOT exaggerating when I tell you that it was the standard for the residents to be dressed and tossed into their chairs between 3 and 5 a.m. (breakfast was at 5:30 a.m. Who the heck wants to eat at 5:30 am???), and not touched again until they went to bed between 7-9 p.m. I'd never have believed it if I hadn't

worked there myself, for the worst 3 months of my life. Sure, they got poor scores on the state surveys, but I never saw state back in there to investigate anything, and I KNOW there were complaints made by family/visitors/staff.

SO, yeah, because of that experience, I can definitely see the OP's post as possible. Most LTC facilities seem to fall somewhere in the middle, but those hellholes DO exist.

Thujone

Thujone

Has 1 years experience. 1 Article; 317 Posts

TBH, it sounds like the CNA you had was of poor quality. There are so many of them out there, and not in the sense that they lack the skills, but in that they lack compassion and have started doing things only for the sake of just getting the job done. I have about 14 residents to care for, but most of them are pretty self sustaining. I just have to change them, get them up if they are in bed and dinner is about to be served and they eat in the dining room, or if they have an appointment or shower. I start by laying out towels and wash clothes in the rooms that require baths, and I put fresh bed linen in every room and I pull out briefs, and have them out so that I don't have to waste time, and I store a bunch of gloves in my pocket. My goal is to make sure that these people are not sitting in dirty briefs all day long and that they are where they need to be on time. I am new to being a CNA, but I've had the pleasure of being trained with an excellent CNA (I've also trained with some decent ones, and I can tell the difference, and I've observed the bad ones from a distance, thank god they didn't stick me with them for training.)

nohika

nohika

506 Posts

I didn't make it in LTC - I couldn't handle how the other CNAs were like "do XYZ while you give her her snack, or she'll talk your damn ear off". I get that time was of the essence (on nights we had 25-30 pts who needed to be rounded on 3 times in under eight hours after filling up water pitchers, dealing with the people who were CONSTANTLY getting out of bed, the morbidly obese lady who was CONSTANTLY on her frickin' call light, the sweet demented old man who was constantly on his light looking for his hat, with his wife on HER light telling him there was no damn hat.

I couldn't handle it. They did not get the care they needed from me because I could not be in so many places at once. I hated cutting the corners I had to. I did end up leaving the medical field (was originally going to pursue nursing) because of my experience in this place.

LTC is heart breaking. Those that care, don't always last.

DixieRedHead

DixieRedHead, ASN, RN

Specializes in ED/ICU/TELEMETRY/LTC. Has 20 years experience. 638 Posts

"

ltc is heart breaking. those that care, don't always last."

don't you dare tar everyone with the same brush. many many fine cnas and dedicated workers of all degrees of education do last for exactly the reason that they care. just because you didn't check out the facility before accepting a job, and couldn't last, doesn't mean we are all that way.

"4:42 am by nohika

I didn't make it in LTC - I couldn't handle how the other CNAs were like "do XYZ while you give her her snack, or she'll talk your damn ear off". I get that time was of the essence (on nights we had 25-30 pts who needed to be rounded on 3 times in under eight hours after filling up water pitchers, dealing with the people who were CONSTANTLY getting out of bed, the morbidly obese lady who was CONSTANTLY on her frickin' call light, the sweet demented old man who was constantly on his light looking for his hat, with his wife on HER light telling him there was no damn hat.

I couldn't handle it. They did not get the care they needed from me because I could not be in so many places at once. I hated cutting the corners I had to. I did end up leaving the medical field (was originally going to pursue nursing) because of my experience in this place.

LTC is heart breaking. Those that care, don't always last."

You sound just like me. I had to get out of LTC for absolutely exactly the same reason. It drained the life out of me, and no matter how much I gave out I could never give enough to all the people I was required to take care of. There was barely enough time for just the very basic of care, sometimes there wasn't enough time even for that. I sometimes felt like I was herding cattle. Blessings on all the dedicated souls who don't wash out of LTC like I did :bow:

stefanyjoy

stefanyjoy

252 Posts

Curious as to why some people would think I would make something like this up. I work full time, am a part time student, was just accepted into NS for this fall, plus I am a single parent. I have a lot better things to do with my time than to troll a nursing message board. I come here for advice, feedback, information and a funny story after a long day. To those wondering, the unit I was doing my clinical on was for mainly Medicare/Medicaid recipients (they actually had a seperate hall for people with private insurance - in the front of the building - so it looked all plush at first glance). I'm guessing the little family I did see visit just didn't have any other options. I know a lot of them did complain about it smelling like poop all the time in the halls. Most of the residents I was assigned to did not have family that visited, which is why they stuck them with the CNA students.

nurseprnRN

nurseprnRN, BSN, RN

2 Articles; 5,114 Posts

maybe the charge nurse realized that the patients needed a little 1:1 care, even if it was only one day of a cna student. you made a difference that one day. that's all we can do sometimes. well, that and call the state for a stat inspection.

mindyfromcali

mindyfromcali

101 Posts

I worked LTC for one year, and sadly that isn't surprising. As someone who has done plenty of oral care on residents, the crusty stuff may be caked on. Sometimes it actually hurts them if you try to scrub all of it off. I had one resident who had it on there so bad that when i tried to scrub it off as gently as possible, and even with just a toothette it bled and she asked me to stop (which of course I did). You can only do the best you can while you're there. As far as "spoiling" residents, here's the thing, the CNAs in most facilities are very overworked. I would literally be going as fast as humanly possible and still feel like I hadn't accomplished everything I wanted to through the whole day. Especially during a day shift, with meals, showers, visitors, it can get super hectic. CNAs get tired and don't always know how to compartmentalize it. When the students come in and help, it is tough to get everything done, because instead of just doing it we have to explain it, and the residents' routines aren't always in line with what you're learning at school. LTC is tough to see and even harder as a job to do every day (coming from someone who would most of the time work 6 days a week). I would remind myself every day that I needed to treat every resident like I would treat my grandparents, or how I would want my family to be treated. I'm really sorry you had to see that. If you do see abuse or neglect, though, report it.

IsmeAmanda

IsmeAmanda, LPN

Has 12 years experience. 128 Posts

As some others have said, you will have more than one patient BUT THAT DOES NOT MEAN A PERSON SHOULD VALUE QUANTITY OVER QUALITY. In my clinicals, my CNA was awesome. She was fast and always listened to her patients. She was also done 30 minutes before her lunch and used those 30 minutes to check on her residents.

Keep in mind, this lady had 12 residents.

Your CNA was god-awful and I feel sorry for anyone in her care.

rgroyer1RNBSN

rgroyer1RNBSN, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER/SICU/Med-Surg/Ortho/Trauma/Flight. 395 Posts

I dont care who you are or how many pts. You have this may not constitute abuse, pretty close if you ask me although, but it does constitute neglet, and I was an aide and then an lpn before I completed my Rn, oooooh only if I was her charge nurse.Rod, Rn, Bsn, Cen, Ccrn

stefanyjoy

stefanyjoy

252 Posts

It's been over a year since I posted this thread and I just wanted to give an update. I'm an NAII now and halfway finished with NS. I've only worked in hospitals since but I have a much better understanding of the daily grind of an NA. This was abuse, neglect. These details are not fabricated, this is not hyperbole. I'm so happy to say I've only seen patients in the 2 hospitals I've been at receive only the most respectful care from the NA's. I don't understand how anyone could defend the behaviors of these "healthcare" workers. I still think about that first patient I ever had and wonder what became of her. I hope her family got her out of there.