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Epinephrine via ET tube?

Posted

I'm a student preparing for my acls class, and upon reading it says we can give epinephrine via ET Tube, diluted in 10cc of saline...

This may be a dumb question.. But why would you put water and medicine down someone's trachea?

How is that effective?

How is that safe?

SwansonRN

Has 2 years experience.

You can do this. It's not the preferred way and I have never seen it. I suppose it may have been done more frequently in instances where IV access couldn't be established before IOs were widely used.

Think about where the med would end up if it were pushed down an ETT. The purpose is for it to get absorbed via the alveoli in the patients lungs. Narcan, atropine, vasopressin, epi, and lidocaine can all be administered this way. Think NAVEL.

Edited by SwansonRN

nursemeanie

Has 10 years experience.

If you are in need of Epi and are sick enough that the only way to give it is through the ET tube, a little fluid in your lungs is the least of your problems

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 16 years experience.

Better a little fluid in the lungs than dead, although at that point the outcome may be inevitable.

Thanks!

I was thinking a bit a fluid in the lungs are the least of their problems, but was more so confused as to how it worked.

Being absorbed by the alveoli makes sense.

I'll surely try and remember Navel for my class!!

cardiacfreak, ADN

Specializes in Hospice.

I was involved in a code last week and lost the peripheral IV, respiratory gave 2 doses of epi via ET tube before we got IO access.

Altra, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency & Trauma/Adult ICU.

Think about the larger context: the scenario you describe here is cardiac arrest or nonperfusing rhythm, and lack of vascular access. Your patient is clinically dead at this moment. 10mL of fluid in the lungs is not even on the top 10 list of the patient's problems right now.

Think about the larger context: the scenario you describe here is cardiac arrest or nonperfusing rhythm, and lack of vascular access. Your patient is clinically dead at this moment. 10mL of fluid in the lungs is not even on the top 10 list of the patient's problems right now.

That really puts it in perspective...

I'm happy to say I passed my class and I'm ACLS certified!

Not just the alveoli-- any of the tracheal/bronchial surfaces can absorb this. Beats being a dead person.