Jump to content

Do pH nurses change their title to doctors?

Doctoral   (643 Views | 16 Replies)

Future MSN has 1 years experience and specializes in Public Health Science.

515 Profile Views; 51 Posts

I am curious as to whether nurses are called doctors once they finish their pHD in nursing?   I am not sure if it matters much to be called doctor but I imagine the extra knowlege is very rewarding because it can help patients directly. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,111 Posts; 11,338 Profile Views

This would apply to any nurse who hold a terminal degree.  Ph.D., EdD, or DNP

Any terminal degree that works in academia would be referred to as Doctor.  Within a clinical setting it is hit/miss and often dictated by facility policy (many facilities will by policy not allow non physician provider cannot refer to themselves as Doctor as not to risk confusing patients.) 

The most I see in clinical setting is that on jacket embroidery the terminal degree will be listed.  Mindy834920, Nurse Practitioner, Ph.D.  and then they will introduce themselves to patient's as "I'm Mindy834920  nurse practitioner."  not "I'm Dr. Mindy834920 nurse practitioner. "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

7 Followers; 13,346 Posts; 60,561 Profile Views

I work in an environment where most people use their first names.   So that is what I do.   Everyone calls me by my first name.   I sign my e-mails with my first name only most of the time -- or just my first and last name, no initials.   But my e-mail signature that automatically attaches to the bottoms of my e-mails includes my contact information as well as the proper letters after my name.   That allows people to know who I am, what my credentials are and what department I work in. 

But there have been a few times when I have been in conversations with med students or physicians who were trying to assert power over me or elevate themselves in some way because of their MD -- and I have responded using my "Doctor" title.   Or because I teach part time at a local university, my "Professor" title.   But I only do that power trip thing if someone else starts it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tegridy specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-1.

206 Posts; 587 Profile Views

Depends if your pH is acidic or Basic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

amoLucia specializes in LTC.

2 Followers; 5,623 Posts; 47,274 Profile Views

For all the work that goes into an EARNED doctorate, the recipients deserve the accolade of Doctor. And where appropriate, I will use the title for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Numenor has 8 years experience as a MSN, NP and specializes in Internal Medicine.

166 Posts; 278 Profile Views

No NP I know uses the term doctor in an inpatient clinical setting. Culturally it just isn't a thing. Pharmacists and PTs are often "doctors" too, do we call them that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

7 Followers; 13,346 Posts; 60,561 Profile Views

16 minutes ago, Numenor said:

No NP I know uses the term doctor in an inpatient clinical setting. Culturally it just isn't a thing. Pharmacists and PTs are often "doctors" too, do we call them that?

You should call them "Doctor" if you are addressing them by their last name.  Why would you deny them the title they have earned?

Do you call them "Miss" if they are unmarried? -- the same title you would use for a little girl?  (Or do you use "Ms.")

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Numenor has 8 years experience as a MSN, NP and specializes in Internal Medicine.

166 Posts; 278 Profile Views

45 minutes ago, llg said:

You should call them "Doctor" if you are addressing them by their last name.  Why would you deny them the title they have earned?

Do you call them "Miss" if they are unmarried? -- the same title you would use for a little girl?  (Or do you use "Ms.")

No one actually does this though. Clinical world is different from academia. We say Bob from PT or John the NP with the hospitalist team.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,111 Posts; 11,338 Profile Views

20 hours ago, Numenor said:

No one actually does this though. Clinical world is different from academia. We say Bob from PT or John the NP with the hospitalist team.

I work with a physician that got a doctorate in PT prior to going to medical school.. I address him as Dr. Doctor  🙂

Edited by 203bravo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

7 Followers; 13,346 Posts; 60,561 Profile Views

21 hours ago, Numenor said:

No one actually does this though. Clinical world is different from academia. We say Bob from PT or John the NP with the hospitalist team.

If you read my earlier post, you may have noticed that I use my first name in the hospital, too.    But my question was referring to those times when people are not on a first-name basis.   For example, the 22 year old new grad nurse and the 64 year old physician ... or PT.     There are people who are not on a first-name-basis with each other.   What happens then.   Does the nurse with a DNP or PhD become the  diminutive "Miss ----"   while the 30 year old physician or psychologist become "Dr. ___" ?    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Numenor has 8 years experience as a MSN, NP and specializes in Internal Medicine.

166 Posts; 278 Profile Views

55 minutes ago, llg said:

If you read my earlier post, you may have noticed that I use my first name in the hospital, too.    But my question was referring to those times when people are not on a first-name basis.   For example, the 22 year old new grad nurse and the 64 year old physician ... or PT.     There are people who are not on a first-name-basis with each other.   What happens then.   Does the nurse with a DNP or PhD become the  diminutive "Miss ----"   while the 30 year old physician or psychologist become "Dr. ___" ?    

Regardless, it still doesn't happen that way. The only "doctors" by name in he hospital are physicians.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.