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Do pH nurses change their title to doctors?

Posted

Specializes in Public Health Science. Has 2 years experience.

I am curious as to whether nurses are called doctors once they finish their pHD in nursing? I am not sure if it matters much to be called doctor but I imagine the extra knowlege is very rewarding because it can help patients directly.

This would apply to any nurse who hold a terminal degree. Ph.D., EdD, or DNP.

Any terminal degree that works in academia would be referred to as Doctor. Within a clinical setting it is hit/miss and often dictated by facility policy (many facilities will by policy not allow non physician provider cannot refer to themselves as Doctor as not to risk confusing patients.)

The most I see in clinical setting is that on jacket embroidery the terminal degree will be listed. Mindy834920, Nurse Practitioner, Ph.D. and then they will introduce themselves to patient's as "I'm Mindy834920 nurse practitioner." not "I'm Dr. Mindy834920 nurse practitioner. "

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

I work in an environment where most people use their first names. So that is what I do. Everyone calls me by my first name. I sign my e-mails with my first name only most of the time -- or just my first and last name, no initials. But my e-mail signature that automatically attaches to the bottoms of my e-mails includes my contact information as well as the proper letters after my name. That allows people to know who I am, what my credentials are and what department I work in.

But there have been a few times when I have been in conversations with med students or physicians who were trying to assert power over me or elevate themselves in some way because of their MD -- and I have responded using my "Doctor" title. Or because I teach part time at a local university, my "Professor" title. But I only do that power trip thing if someone else starts it.

Tegridy

Specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-1.

Depends if your pH is acidic or Basic

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

For all the work that goes into an EARNED doctorate, the recipients deserve the accolade of Doctor. And where appropriate, I will use the title for them.

Numenor, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

No NP I know uses the term doctor in an inpatient clinical setting. Culturally it just isn't a thing. Pharmacists and PTs are often "doctors" too, do we call them that?

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

16 minutes ago, Numenor said:

No NP I know uses the term doctor in an inpatient clinical setting. Culturally it just isn't a thing. Pharmacists and PTs are often "doctors" too, do we call them that?

You should call them "Doctor" if you are addressing them by their last name. Why would you deny them the title they have earned?

Do you call them "Miss" if they are unmarried? -- the same title you would use for a little girl? (Or do you use "Ms.")

Numenor, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

45 minutes ago, llg said:

You should call them "Doctor" if you are addressing them by their last name. Why would you deny them the title they have earned?

Do you call them "Miss" if they are unmarried? -- the same title you would use for a little girl? (Or do you use "Ms.")

No one actually does this though. Clinical world is different from academia. We say Bob from PT or John the NP with the hospitalist team.

20 hours ago, Numenor said:

No one actually does this though. Clinical world is different from academia. We say Bob from PT or John the NP with the hospitalist team.

I work with a physician that got a doctorate in PT prior to going to medical school.. I address him as Dr. Doctor 🙂

Edited by 203bravo

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

21 hours ago, Numenor said:

No one actually does this though. Clinical world is different from academia. We say Bob from PT or John the NP with the hospitalist team.

If you read my earlier post, you may have noticed that I use my first name in the hospital, too. But my question was referring to those times when people are not on a first-name basis. For example, the 22 year old new grad nurse and the 64 year old physician ... or PT. There are people who are not on a first-name-basis with each other. What happens then. Does the nurse with a DNP or PhD become the diminutive "Miss ----" while the 30 year old physician or psychologist become "Dr. ___" ?

Numenor, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

55 minutes ago, llg said:

If you read my earlier post, you may have noticed that I use my first name in the hospital, too. But my question was referring to those times when people are not on a first-name basis. For example, the 22 year old new grad nurse and the 64 year old physician ... or PT. There are people who are not on a first-name-basis with each other. What happens then. Does the nurse with a DNP or PhD become the diminutive "Miss ----" while the 30 year old physician or psychologist become "Dr. ___" ?

Regardless, it still doesn't happen that way. The only "doctors" by name in he hospital are physicians.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

On 5/1/2020 at 3:46 PM, Numenor said:

Regardless, it still doesn't happen that way. The only "doctors" by name in he hospital are physicians.

Perhaps in your hospital ... but not in mine. We have "doctors" in many different fields. While we tend to use first names more often than not, when we use last names, most people show respect for their colleagues and use their proper titles.

LovingPeds, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Clinical Pediatrics; Maternal-Child Educator. Has 11 years experience.

I think it depends greatly the context of the situation. In academia anyone who has earned a doctorate is given the honorific "Doctor". In polite conversation, anyone who you are not on first name basis with who introduces themselves as a doctor in any field is "Doctor" until they tell you otherwise. In terms of direct patient care, most people who have earned a doctorate (PT, Pharmacists, Nurses) forego the formality with as to avoid confusion with physicians. There are many people in the world who do not understand that the term "doctor" does not always refer to a medical doctor. It's more for ease of not having to explain yourself or to avoid confusing a patient. I have worked with many NPs who have either a PhD or a DNP and none of them have ever introduced themselves to their own patients with the title of doctor. However, I have seen one of these same NPs while doing clinical introduce themselves as "Doctor XYZ, a clinical instructor with ABC school." Personal preference also plays a role.

DrCOVID, DNP

Specializes in mental health/medical-surgical. Has 12 years experience.

This crap has been beaten to death already. Anyone that holds a doctoral degree can introduce themselves as doctor no matter what setting you are in as long as you explain what kinda doctor you are. Not rocket science.

That being said, most of the time we just use first name in the various clinical settings.

Edited by adammRN

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

Dentists are doctors; chiropractors are doctors; even veterinarians are doctors.

So I have no problems according those with EARNED doctorates their due.

It all depends on the situation and preferences.

Though I do dislike the bombastic, pompous folk who seem more impressed with themselves than others are.

DrCOVID, DNP

Specializes in mental health/medical-surgical. Has 12 years experience.

37 minutes ago, amoLucia said:

Though I do dislike the bombastic, pompous folk who seem more impressed with themselves than others are.

This is not exclusive to those who have achieved academic doctorates of any kind 😉

Edited by adammRN

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

On 5/1/2020 at 3:46 PM, Numenor said:

Regardless, it still doesn't happen that way. The only "doctors" by name in he hospital are physicians.

Absolutely not true. I work with MDs, DOs, DPT, PharmDs, scientists, engineers... if they have a doctorate and we are not on first name basis, I call them "Dr xxxxx".