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Do Not Hire

Posted

Specializes in Medical-Surgical, Education, Community Health. Has 13 years experience.

Hi everyone!

I have been an LVN for 2 1/2 months, and for those 2 months I worked at a large hospital system here in San Antonio, Texas.

I got a job offer from another facility, closer to home, with better pay. I called my facility director to set up a time talk to her her. For two days I couldn't get a hold of her, and eventually I left her a message stating that I had found another job, and I wanted to come in and talk to her about my options, and plead for her to call me ASAP because I was due to come in for work a few days from then.

The next morning, while I was in the shower, she called and left me a nasty message stating that I was put on the "Do Not Hire" list for all 5 hospitals within the hospital system.I was shocked! I at no time quit over the phone, simply stated that I needed to get in touch with her and set a meeting in person.

I am really worried that when I become an RN that not being able to work at these hospitals will really put a damper on my job hopes. Although there are numerous hospital system here in San Antonio, I'm just worried that I'm screwed.

I have written a letter to the hospital HR representative, and am hoping for the best, as eventually when I specialize I would like to return. I'm thinking though that since the director has been there for many years that they will side with her and keep me on the "Do Not Hire" list.

Give me some info. Has this ever happened to you? Was this wrong of her to do? ?

Dave in San Antonio

This is does not make sense to me unless you told her you weren't coming to work or did not show up for work. Not sure what you can really do about it, other than what you have done. For future reference, if you are looking for another job - DO NOT tell anyone, if you get a job offer - DO NOT tell anyone, if you take a job - until you turn in a written resignation DO NOT tell anyone. When you let an employer know that you are considering leaving/or when you turn in a resignation, they often will boot you out ASAP to ensure that you do not harm their property, steal property, cause low staff morale, complain about things, etc. This is some of the new HR tactics that healthcare is using. It used to be for other industries only but now it's in our world.

David Offenbaker, BSN, RN

Specializes in Medical-Surgical, Education, Community Health. Has 13 years experience.

I guess my mistake was telling her. I felt she would understand as she said she always had an open-door policy. I didn't want to just not show up for work the following Monday, I would never do that. That's why I called her days in advance so I could talk to her before she took off for the weekend.

I think she went way too far, and I'm hoping that they can see the truth in all of it. If not, I dont think my future as an RN will be harmed-- one would only hope! :idea:

Hellllllo Nurse, BSN, RN

Has 15 years experience.

Most organizations have a policy that any employee leaving without giving two weeks written notice will be put on "do not re-hire" status.

Well Dave, you are not alone. Know many nurses who changed jobs and were placed on that list for one reason or another. Just move on, there are other options when you need them. Besides, you left there because of location and pay. Those are good reasons to change jobs.

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology. Has 25 years experience.

For future reference, if you are looking for another job - DO NOT tell anyone, if you get a job offer - DO NOT tell anyone, if you take a job - until you turn in a written resignation DO NOT tell anyone. When you let an employer know that you are considering leaving/or when you turn in a resignation, they often will boot you out ASAP to ensure that you do not harm their property, steal property, cause low staff morale, complain about things, etc. This is some of the new HR tactics that healthcare is using. It used to be for other industries only but now it's in our world.

That would be extraordinarily difficult in the health care region I work for. When you go to an interview here, and they look at your references, they expect to see someone from management in your current unit on your list. And they follow up. One of my coworkers had a bad experience where the manager lied about her abilities and her personality when she was called for a reference. The kicker was that the person doing the checking already knew the nurse, and was only following procedure.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Did you give 2 weeks written notice? If so, then I would say that is enough. However, if you called the manager on the phone and just said "I'm quitting now" or with less than two weeks notice, I can see where you would get on the " not eligible for rehire" list.

I have learned even though it should not be a concern in a perfect world, the less you tell anyone higher up about what you plan on doing, the better. Trust me... don't trust anyone but yourself. It sucks... but that's the way it goes. :( It's why we have unions. I'm pro-union but it saddens me that they have to exist in the first place.

OMG forgot to tell you, SAVE THE VOICE-MAIL! If you intend on fighting it, the fact that she was overtly nasty over the phone will help you.

this is the very reason i believe nurses should be unionized

ukstudent

Specializes in SICU.

I didn't want to just not show up for work the following Monday, I would never do that. That's why I called her days in advance so I could talk to her before she took off for the weekend.

Learn from this. Yes this could hurt you when you become an RN. You need to know the hospital policy for giving your resignation. I am sure that yours did not say to leave a voice message saying that you have quit and will not be at work next week. Resignations need to be in writing with at least 2 weeks notice. The other are correct in that until you give notice, do not tell anyone, but you do need to give notice.

Unfortunately for the nursing industry there are alot of people at the top, so to speak, who lack real management skills and one key trait and that is common sense and also lets add compassion. They forget when the money gets good what it was like to be on the bottom, or at least to be seeking a job. I finds this to be true with so many oldtimer, longtimers. But to be fair they know something and that is, keep a job. Especially in these times. Do whatever you have to do. I have lost jobs trying to keep my integrity when I was around nurses who behaved shamelessly, yet I had different rules applied to me because I was new, registry, or lets say the wrong color in the wrong stream. I say just always remember that it's not fair, and it's not about you. Hospitals are corporations and they work like any other corporation. They make alot of mistakes too, but as you can see from what goes on in corporate america overall the bad folks are everywhere. Always work smart. Don't talk too much, never sit in cliques because nurses gossip. And weak managers manage from gossip rather than investigation. Always show up on time and leave late. If you must do anything go to HR first and ask "general" questions about sick leave, vacation, etc. to guise your question. Yes, hospitals do have do not hire lists however nurses don't do anything about this, you need to call your Board of Registred nursing and congress people and you need to write letters to hospitals and let them know you won't stand for it. You can fight back. And you don't need a union to do it. Remember there are always people at hospitals who are bad but they are protected because they will work triples and quadruples and hospitals like that, but those people endanger patients. Start letting hospitals know you know. Also call the licensing department of state and let them know about the do not hire stuff, find people who can advocate for you.

Or you can try to call the facility director and arrange for a meeting to talk about what seems to be a miscommunication. Let her know that you are interested in working for the hospital in the future and ask what you can do to be taken off that list.

I hate to disagree but I have to. This is the text book answer. Sit down and talk with management. management is so bad and paranoid if you asked for a meeting they'd have three people waiting for you, and they'd be worrying that you are going to call Jcahco. Hospitals work paranoid all the time. I am telling you.

The best way is to keep quiet and gather your info like they do theirs and always play your cards tight to your chest.

Well, it has been three years since the OP. Wonder if Dave ever tried to get back with that hospital group and what happened.

I am so sorry this has happened to you! How is it possible that hospitals have a "Do not hire" list?! This definitely sounds like something that needs some legal action.

littleneoRN

Specializes in NICU. Has 6 years experience.

I know the OP's situation is old, but here's something to know if you're a newer RN or LPN reading this. If you leave a position after a short period of time (which I would personally define as a year or less) and/or leave without a minimum of 2 weeks notice, you should expect to be on that facility or system's Do Not Rehire list. (Yes this is legit and legal.) It's kind of common sense. It costs a typical hospital $50,000-$80,000 to find, hire, and orient a nurse without prior experience. If he or she doesn't stick around long, this is a big money loser. Obviously, there are legitimate reasons for leaving after a short time, but don't expect that facility to take a chance on you again. Think carefully before leaving a job after a short time, and then do so only if truly feel this is the best decision for you. I hope that the OP made the best decision for him and that all has worked out ok.

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