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Did being a CNA make you NOT want to be a nurse anymore?

CNA/MA   (79,680 Views 89 Comments)
by emily_ganshert emily_ganshert (New Member) New Member

5,052 Visitors; 79 Posts

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You are reading page 2 of Did being a CNA make you NOT want to be a nurse anymore?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

3,674 Visitors; 157 Posts

I was about to post the same topic. I totally changed my mind about being an RN. On Tuesday, I worked a 16.5-hour shift because I didn't want to leave the RN alone with all the patients coming in. Everyone else called in sick.

Hang in there our situation should get better.

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2 Likes; 1 Follower; 34,380 Visitors; 2,232 Posts

I became a CNA on a whim.

I was 17 and my best friend called me up, "Hey, I'm taking a CNA class. You wanna take it with me?"

Total whim.

I thought I was going to be an Art teacher, lol.

I decided I'd do it. I thought maybe it would be cool to eventually become a nurse.

I took the class and started working, and, like most, really really sucked when I first started.

But after a few months, I kicked butt. I was an excellent and conscientious aide. The patients liked having me and I fell in love with geriatrics.

I began to really look around at what the nurses did.

And ya know what?

I said, "He********** no!"

I realized how much overwhelming responsibility the nurses had and they didn't get to interact with the patients like we did.

HOWEVER, after 16 years as an aide, I bit the bullet and started prereq's for school and got into the nursing program. I'll be done in December.

So, being a CNA didn't deter me, as in "oh my gosh, being an aide stinks, so being a nurse must stink". I was more like, "being an aide is hard work, but it's fun... being a nurse stinks and I don't want their job".

And, let me clarify, the profession of nursing is vastly interesting, but it was seeing all the charting, phone calls, annoying doctors, insubordinate aides and impossible demands made on nurses that freaked me out.

I don't think I necessarily like what I got myself into, but life works out funny sometimes and I'll be so proud and better off when I'm done.

Cheers!

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5,052 Visitors; 79 Posts

I became a CNA on a whim.

I was 17 and my best friend called me up, "Hey, I'm taking a CNA class. You wanna take it with me?"

Total whim.

I thought I was going to be an Art teacher, lol.

I decided I'd do it. I thought maybe it would be cool to eventually become a nurse.

I took the class and started working, and, like most, really really sucked when I first started.

But after a few months, I kicked butt. I was an excellent and conscientious aide. The patients liked having me and I fell in love with geriatrics.

I began to really look around at what the nurses did.

And ya know what?

I said, "He********** no!"

I realized how much overwhelming responsibility the nurses had and they didn't get to interact with the patients like we did.

HOWEVER, after 16 years as an aide, I bit the bullet and started prereq's for school and got into the nursing program. I'll be done in December.

So, being a CNA didn't deter me, as in "oh my gosh, being an aide stinks, so being a nurse must stink". I was more like, "being an aide is hard work, but it's fun... being a nurse stinks and I don't want their job".

And, let me clarify, the profession of nursing is vastly interesting, but it was seeing all the charting, phone calls, annoying doctors, insubordinate aides and impossible demands made on nurses that freaked me out.

I don't think I necessarily like what I got myself into, but life works out funny sometimes and I'll be so proud and better off when I'm done.

Cheers!

This is wonderful! Thank you for taking the time to tell me your story. So tell me, why DID you decide to "bite the bullet" and become an RN? Better pay, or did you just want/need a change?

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kool-aide, RN has 5 years experience and works as a New grad RN, CNA of 5 years.

13,840 Visitors; 594 Posts

I really had no idea what nursing was when I decided to become a CNA. I took the class and was HORRIFIED at what I was expected to do in clinical.....at first. Once I FINALLY became comfortable in the nursing home, clinical time was over, I got my job at a hospital and had to become comfortable with this new environment. Working at my hospital, I am employed by the nursing resource center which means I float to most of the units in 3 different hospitals that are owned by the same corporation and I had to be oriented to each of them (about 15, all together) and learn about each different type of patient population(orthopaedics, cardiac, medical, surgical, renal, neuro, critical care, pediatrics, etc) this was EXTREMELY difficult because I was a new CNA and I was first just trying to figure out the basics of my job, not to mention all of the little details tht you have to know when working in so many different areas in the hospital. But, I had an awesome preceptor and I made it through. It's been about 1.5 years since I started and I'm very good at what I do and I LOVE my job. It was the best decision I have ever made. I can't wait to be accepted into nursing school, hopefully next year. :)

If I were you, I would try to find a CNA job in a local hospital. I gaurantee you that it's much better(in my opinion) than LTC. You'll learn SO much from just going to work. Give nursing another chance.

All the best,

Timmyg.

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1,408 Visitors; 11 Posts

I am half way through my clinical portion of CNA class. The first day at the facility I did have moments when I thought I couldn't go through with nursing at all.

By the end of the day I knew for sure that nursing is the right choice for me and that I must continue on and get straight A's so that I don't end up doing CNA work!!!

I do admire the good CNA's out there ( I have come across some pretty crappy ones in the short three days at the facility) the residents are totally dependent upon them and they truly do make a difference in this world.

The RN's do seam to do nothing more than meds and charting, but I know from experience in a hospital setting that RN work does entail much more than that.

Don't be discouraged. Remember that when you do become an RN you will have a better understanding of what your aids are going through and how to communicate with them more effectively. All of the RN's I have spoken with have told me that a good CNA is invaluable and can make or break your day.

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2 Likes; 1 Follower; 34,380 Visitors; 2,232 Posts

This is wonderful! Thank you for taking the time to tell me your story. So tell me, why DID you decide to "bite the bullet" and become an RN? Better pay, or did you just want/need a change?

I got a job at a hospital that has an amazing tuition reimbursement program (my education has been essentially "free").

I was 35 years-old an felt I was getting too old to be an aide (my own perception of me).

I love CNA work and want to teach the CNA class.

I had a neighbor whose husband passed away. She was left with four small children. I felt needed a "plan" if anything happened to my husband.

Turns out, about a week, after the blazing joy of finding myself accepted into the nursing program, my husband informed me that he wanted a divorce. He left me for the widow with four kids!

So.

I guess I was wise to get into nursing school!

I still don't know if it's for me. I'm only so smart and often don't feel smart enough, but I can at least do my best and try try try!

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ctmed has 4 years experience and works as a CNA.

7,007 Visitors; 316 Posts

It is easy to feel this way. I am currently taking a long break from CNA work. It puts it back into perspective.

CNA has some good things I think everyone needs to see that will make them a better person.

However, nursing as a field can be full of politics, having to deal with difficult people (patients and staff), and a do-not-mess-up-or-we get-you atmosphere.

RN is a different job, though. A RN is more of a paperwork and medicine pushing job and you get much better pay and treatment.

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898 Visitors; 8 Posts

..........

Edited by lillybeans

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898 Visitors; 8 Posts

I became a CNA on a whim.

I was 17 and my best friend called me up, "Hey, I'm taking a CNA class. You wanna take it with me?"

Total whim.

I thought I was going to be an Art teacher, lol.

I decided I'd do it. I thought maybe it would be cool to eventually become a nurse.

I took the class and started working, and, like most, really really sucked when I first started.

But after a few months, I kicked butt. I was an excellent and conscientious aide. The patients liked having me and I fell in love with geriatrics.

I began to really look around at what the nurses did.

And ya know what?

I said, "He********** no!"

I realized how much overwhelming responsibility the nurses had and they didn't get to interact with the patients like we did.

HOWEVER, after 16 years as an aide, I bit the bullet and started prereq's for school and got into the nursing program. I'll be done in December.

So, being a CNA didn't deter me, as in "oh my gosh, being an aide stinks, so being a nurse must stink". I was more like, "being an aide is hard work, but it's fun... being a nurse stinks and I don't want their job".

And, let me clarify, the profession of nursing is vastly interesting, but it was seeing all the charting, phone calls, annoying doctors, insubordinate aides and impossible demands made on nurses that freaked me out.

I don't think I necessarily like what I got myself into, but life works out funny sometimes and I'll be so proud and better off when I'm done.

Cheers!

Was it hard to get back into school? Or did you already have some college credits..? My problem is I never went to college... :( and it's now been maybe 10 years.. I want to get my RN degree but I don't know how i'm going to pass to the assessment test...

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898 Visitors; 8 Posts

I got a job at a hospital that has an amazing tuition reimbursement program (my education has been essentially "free").

I was 35 years-old an felt I was getting too old to be an aide (my own perception of me).

I love CNA work and want to teach the CNA class.

I had a neighbor whose husband passed away. She was left with four small children. I felt needed a "plan" if anything happened to my husband.

Turns out, about a week, after the blazing joy of finding myself accepted into the nursing program, my husband informed me that he wanted a divorce. He left me for the widow with four kids!

So.

I guess I was wise to get into nursing school!

I still don't know if it's for me. I'm only so smart and often don't feel smart enough, but I can at least do my best and try try try!

That's horrible.. what a jerk! Yay for nursing school. =)

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Cinquefoil has 2 years experience.

7,732 Visitors; 198 Posts

If you like working with the elderly but don't like LTC nursing, have you considered home health or hospice?

Hospice is what I'm headed for. I work in LTC but I almost always click instantly with the hospice RN's. Dying doesn't depress me as much as poor patient care, and I've also seen people improve and be taken off of hospice after enjoying the increased support hospice can give.

Hospice nurses are generally ENCOURAGED to sit down and really get to know their patients....many nurses know they could benefit from doing this and would like to take the time, but are discouraged from this by caseload. Many hospice agencies make sure to do things a bit differently. So if you like quality time with the elderly, hospice might be another option for you.

PT sounds fun too - I agree that PT's in LTC seem to have found a decent spot, and are also encouraged to actually have fun with the residents because then the residents *GASP* enjoy the PT and want to do it again! But of course I'm not a PT myself so take this with a grain of salt :)

Finally, have you considered geriatric social work?

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2 Likes; 1 Follower; 34,380 Visitors; 2,232 Posts

Was it hard to get back into school? Or did you already have some college credits..? My problem is I never went to college... :( and it's now been maybe 10 years.. I want to get my RN degree but I don't know how i'm going to pass to the assessment test...

I was already an established student at my community college, so no, it was no biggie for me.

I am assuming you mean the assessment for entering the college in general?

That would be your first step... and I can't really think of anything that would prevent you from getting in. Even if your scores were low in Math, they would just want you to take a lower-level math and work your way up to the one you need for the Nursing program.

The assessment is really to see where you would best start from... so you can succeed!

Maybe you could invest in some type of text/workbook that will help you review very basic subjects.

Also, there are counselor's at the college who are there to help you. Try to make an appointment with one and discuss what you would like to achieve and ask the counselor about the best way to do that. If you are worried about the assessment, then the counselor may suggest resources or strategies to help you.

You can do it!!

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