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Course Decisions

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TAF55 TAF55 (New) New

Hello,

I am interested in attending nursing school. I have been doing research and I have found two options that interest me. The first being the BSN program. The second is the RN to BSN program. Which one would you recommend? Either way I want to earn my BSN I just don't know which one to go for. I already have my AA in general studies so I will be a transfer. I will also be attending school in Augusta, GA. I am a military spouse so my options are limited. I am currently not in Georgia but will be in the near future. The transferring process is weighing on my decision. Thank you for the help!

VivaLaVespaGirl, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ED, Medicine, Case Management. Has 5 years experience.

You cannot do an RN to BSN program unless you already have an RN. This is a bridge program that is designed for those who have their associates in Nursing. So your options are really BSN or associates in nursing then bridge to BSN.

RN is a license, not a degree. As PP stated, you must already be a LICENSED RN, which would be through an ADN program) to qualify for the RN to BSN program. The only other option besides a BSN is an ASN, which would be a 2 year program.

Sorry I should have specified more. If I were to do the RN to BSN I'd go to a technical college (Augusta Tech) to get my RN then on to a University (Georgia Regents) to earn my BSN.

@cracklingkraken

Once you graduate from an ADN or ASN program do you have to be working for a year or more in order to be able apply to the RN to BSN program or is the only requirement for applying to the bridge program is that you obtain the RN license by passing the board exam?

Edited by dorkypanda
Spelling

@cracklingkraken

Once you graduate from an ADN or ASN program do you have to be working for a year or more in order to be able apply to the RN to BSN program or is the only requirement for applying to the bridge program is that you obtain the RN license by passing the board exam?

Edited by dorkypanda
Lagging

I believe for most RN to BSN programs, the requirements typically are general courses (such as A&P, Stats, etc.) that you already needed anyways for the ADN program. So no, it usually does not require that you have any work experience. There are several online RN to BSN programs as well.

-cracklingkraken

Thank you for the info! That makes me feel relieved in a way :D

The online route is interesting, wouldn't those people also have to do some kind of clinical experience in person and do nonclinical things online ?

Typically, the BSN consists of more courses, such as Nursing Management, Data Analysis, etc. However, the CLINICAL experience of both a BSN and ADN grad are the same, and qualifies both graduates to sit for the NCLEX RN.

I am in favor of BSN only because I want it done once and for all. But because such tight competitions exist for nursing schools you are better off applying to both ADN & BSN programs, that way your chances of getting into a program is high.

Stephalump

Specializes in Forensic Psych. Has 2 years experience.

-cracklingkraken

Thank you for the info! That makes me feel relieved in a way :D

The online route is interesting, wouldn't those people also have to do some kind of clinical experience in person and do nonclinical things online ?

You've already completed all the clinicals you need, because you've already satisfied the state's requirements in order to take the nclex. It's all 100% online around here.

Hey cracklingkraken,

If it was difficult to get into the BSN program on first attempt, would it be less competitive or just as competitive to get into the bridge RN to BSN program with an associates degree?

It tends to be less competitive. Especially since there are so many options of programs that allow it to be done online, sometimes it is better and quicker to go that route. Of course, it depends on your financial status and the programs available in your area.

It tends to be less competitive. Especially since there are so many options of programs that allow it to be done online, sometimes it is better and quicker to go that route. Of course, it depends on your financial status and the programs available in your area.

That is really neat I didn't know that! I'll take a look into that. I was mostly aware of the physical in classroom programs. thank you :)