Jump to content

Considering LPN.

Posted
MattCM MattCM (New) New

Hi, my name's Matt. I'm 24 years old, and I've been working at a dead ender for 4 years now.

I've always wanted to become a nurse, but because of limited cash, and time, I haven't been able to go to school. But I can't stay at my current job anymore.

I'm considering becoming a LPN to get my foot in the door, and would surely further my education to a BSN in the future. I've been told by a lot of nurses in the workforce that ADN graduates are just not being hired anywhere in central Ohio anymore. Does anyone have any experience, or advice for me?

matthewandrew, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Family & Palliative Nursing. Has 7 years experience.

Why not go for RN or RN/BSN now? LVN school is way too expensive unless it's thru CC.

----------------------

UCLA FNP Class of 2016

I was going to attend a community college for my LVN. I would like to go for my associates, but like I said, I have had a few nurses tell me no one is hiring. I was hoping someone would weigh in on this. I just want to get into a career fast as I can, and I have plans to further my education later, if not right after I land my first job.

Before you enroll in an LPN program you should first do some research on the facilities in your area. Some areas do not utilize LPNs as much as others. Also, some places are not hiring LPNs into the hospital setting anymore. It all depends on where you live. You might research this before investing $ into a program.

I agree with the PP that it might be worth the $ to just go through with your BSN. I live in an area that highly favors BSN nurses so it is difficult for ADNs to find jobs, however, many do or they just travel a bit to a hospital that will hire them. You might look into hospitals a little farther from you if you are willing to travel - that will hire ADN nurses - should you choose to go the ADn route.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

I agree with researching your market; meaning, contact local health care facilities and inquire, while looking at their postings; and see what the information is available to you.

Depending on your area, it may be best to go for the BSN; I will say as a former LPN, I had always been able to find a job, but it was always outside of the hospital: home health, ambulatory/clinic nursing, Pediatric Day care, Medicare charting, Rehab/Sub-Acute; and LTC; and my area hasn't had a nursing shortage in decades.

It has been my experience that LPN is a great example of having a foundation in becoming an RN.

Once you researched your market; if you plan on getting your BSN, PLEASE look into getting to know accreditation (Google ACEN and CCNE) and BON approved schools in your area; in this market, most jobs want to to be approved at an accredited school; not just BON

approved.

Best wishes.

I'll see if I can contact a few employers and ask them how the outlook for Associates Vs Bachelors hires go in the area.

Alex Egan, LPN, EMT-B

Specializes in Home Health (PDN), Camp Nursing. Has 9 years experience.

In my situation I had limited finances and didn't want to invest a lot of time and money in an education, for a profession I wasn't fully sure I wanted to be in. It's all well and good to want to be a nurse, but wanting and being are two very different things. I have met more then a few on this board who is highly educated, and completely unwilling to do bedside nursing. Now realizing and understanding what LPNs do most,(LTC, Home Health, corrections) and accepting I would be willing to work in those environments to decide if nursing was for me. I know I will eventually return for my RN BSN, however I'm happy I have a career that I enjoy and didn't take to much time and left me with no student loan debt. Now as a wise man once said "what might be right for you might not be right for some" so go your own way, but consider my experience.

I use my phone, to type, I work at night, and I'm a bad speller. Pick any reason you want for my misspellings

NurseGirl525, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

I would think the more rural hospitals in your area would hire an ADN. The bigger cities won't but central Ohio is full of rural areas.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Like the OP, I was working at a dead-end factory job when I took the plunge and decided I was going to be a nurse.

The LVN route was my salvation because, as someone with no college credits to my name, I could get into the field after 12 months of basic nursing training.

I see a lot of negativity surrounding becoming an LPN first, and idk why! It has been my saving grace. I enrolled in an 11 month LPN Course at my local community college and graduated this past June. I have since passed the NCLEX, and began my new job at a LTC facility at the beginning of this month. (Just so you know, there is ALWAYS work for an LPN in long term care. Yes, they are being phased out of hospitals.) The hospitals around here pay LPNs around $12-$13 an hour starting out and I was making almost that working as an aid! At my new job I get MUCH better wages. I needed a better job and FAST because I had a 2 year old to raise and decided to do my community college's LPN transition program where you can transition to get your associate degree while working as an LPN. This is what I am currently doing. I'm also able to say that I am gaining valuable work experience for when I DO get my RN, so that I won't have a blank work history section on future job applications. So even if I do only get my associates RN in the beginning, I will still be more valuable than a new grad bachelor degree with ZERO experience as a nurse. Becoming an LPN first has truly been an eye opening experience to me, I would recommend it to anyone who wants to get their foot in the door but either can't afford RN school or wants to be able to work as a nurse while they are enrolled in RN school (my schools RN program is set up to where you can still work full time and attend classes). It's all up to you and your agenda and what type of programs your local schools offer!

libran1984, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Nursing. Has 4 years experience.

My LPN at a CC was about $6,000 (including prereqs/not including books). My ASN was just under $5,000 (including coreqs AND books).

I hear u on the money issue. I work with BSNs who are paying $800/month on student loans.

Even more sadly, I know several ASNs who went to for profit schools and are paying almost as much per month on loans. Oye.

Money is such a factor and always has been

Matt,

I am in Ohio. ADN's are frequently hired in hospitals in Ohio, even in Magnet hospitals. In the case of larger hospitals that are level 1 trauma centers, that employment is almost always conditional on getting a BSN within 5 years (in some cases, 3 years). Some even have tuition reimbursement. But, you are unlikely to be working in the ER, Cardiac surgery, ICU, etc., in a Magnet hospital. Most likely, you would be a med-surg nurse.

But these are just basics and they do not apply to every hospital in Ohio, so you need to look on some job boards for your area and see the requirements of various job openings. That will give you loads of information!

Aside from larger hospitals, physician offices, public health, outpatient surgery centers, long term care, state funded programs (child and adult mental and developmental disability programs), dialysis clinics, occupational specialty clinics, urgent care, and private duty nursing all hire ADN nurses. They rarely have BSN requirements. If you are an RN, you are an RN.

As for LPN, you can work in LTC, occupational specialty clinics, physician offices, urgent care, outpatient surgery centers, state funded programs, rehabilitation hospitals, and hospital specialties (i.e. diabetes centers, weight loss clinics, etc.).

You have options, and only you know what is best for your budget and time management. Thoroughly research what you think will work for you financially within the time frame you desire. You can always get a more advanced degree at a later date. And you have lots of options in Ohio with metropolitan, suburban, and rural areas within a short distance.

Whatever you choose, go for it! I wish you the utmost success. :-)

Vegan_RN

Specializes in Dialysis, Facility Administrator. Has 7 years experience.

I live in Columbus, and it is extremely difficult to get hired on as an ADN. My best advice is to see if you can go straight for your ADN, get a position at a SNF or a doctor's office and then go back to get your BSN online.

I to have seen negative comments about getting your l.p.n. doing and getting into the nursing program is very high and even getting into the l.p.n. program is hard in Oklahoma where i am anyways. I have been trying to get into the l.p.n. program i have tryed twice. I will try once again for the 3rd time in January. The process is not fair too others who aren't book smart so to speak they will take someone off the street with no prior nursing knowledge whatsoever and let them into a program someone who has never worked in a nursing home never taken vitals ect ect . I have since also looked into Private schools in tulsa that offer the r.n. with no prior knowledge og nursing and the cost is astronomical . I believe there are plenty of nursing jobs both as a lpn and rn there is no shortage whatsoever.

I to have seen negative comments about getting your l.p.n. doing and getting into the nursing program is very high and even getting into the l.p.n. program is hard in Oklahoma where i am anyways. I have been trying to get into the l.p.n. program i have tryed twice. I will try once again for the 3rd time in January. The process is not fair too others who aren't book smart so to speak they will take someone off the street with no prior nursing knowledge whatsoever and let them into a program someone who has never worked in a nursing home never taken vitals ect ect . I have since also looked into Private schools in tulsa that offer the r.n. with no prior knowledge og nursing and the cost is astronomical . I believe there are plenty of nursing jobs both as a lpn and rn there is no shortage whatsoever.

Nursing schools generally use an admission standard based on academic abilities, not necessarily the experience or skills learned as a nursing assistant (which are usually taught to new students within the first 3 weeks of school). It is critical that students can perform at a set academic standard because nursing school demands the student maintain the high academic standard throughout the program. Classes such as Biology, Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry, Algebra or advanced math, English composition, etc., are general requirements for most programs, and the foundation of nursing itself. In a limited enrollment program, if the school is unsure that an applicant can get through these classes, they are more likely to choose a student with a great academic record.

Did the school where you applied give you an admissions test? If so, they should have provided you with the areas where you need to concentrate. Take their advice if you really want to go into nursing as an LPN or RN. You will need whatever it is they are asking of you.

I wish you all the best! Please let us know if you found a program, and take care. :-)

Edited by monkeyhq
spelling

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

they will take someone off the street with no prior nursing knowledge whatsoever and let them into a program someone who has never worked in a nursing home never taken vitals ect ect

Almost all entry-level nursing programs (PN and RN) are formulated with a specific design that converts students with no prior healthcare knowledge into functional nurses by the time they complete the program of study.

In other words, no prior healthcare knowledge and nursing skills are needed for admission into nursing school. The only exceptions are the nursing programs that require students to possess CNA certification prior to the start of school, and the bridge programs that allow LPNs to transition to the RN role through advanced placement.

As a previous poster stated, an applicant's academic abilities often carry more weight in nursing school admissions than the fact that the applicant has worked as a CNA, home health aide, MA, phlebotomy technician, or hospital unit secretary. The nursing program directors need to ensure that candidates have good reading comprehension, basic math skills and a somewhat decent science background before allowing just anybody to enroll.

I've been an LPN for 25 years. It's a saturated field that pays very little. The few new grads that were recently hired at the facility I'm at say that they applied to dozens of places prior to landing a job. The workload is overwhelming and the training isn't there.

DO YOUR RESEARCH. Find out if the education costs are worth the hourly pay. You might consider being an STNA and see what nurses do on a daily basis. It's not pleasant, but you'd make enough as an STNA to qualify for grants and scholarships. It might make you decide to go into another more rewarding field.

If I knew at 24 what I know now, nursing would be at the bottom of my career choices. I ALWAYS wanted to be a nurse...until the last ten years. Times have changed. Nursing has changed dramatically.

A Northern Ohio nurse.

I agree with Shelby. I am an LPN, I work on an inpatient Hospice unit. I could only take a limited time off of work. I needed to be working quickly on a full time basis. I supply the health insurance in my home44. I love my job. With that said, I am going back October of this uear to complete my RN. I only have 9 months worth of school left, so it seems like the logical thing to do. I only work three days a week so I will continue to work as an LPN while in school. My LPN program was very expensive.