Jump to content

Consider going for MD?

Posted

Has 16 years experience.

Has anyone ever considered medical school?

I do love what I do, but sometimes I consider going all the way--I always see that NP to MD ad in nursing journals but have never inquired.

Anyone out there look into med schools?

jla623

Specializes in SICU/CVICU.

They have NP to MD schools? Isn't that the same thing as any medical school? You apply and go through your four years like every other student, right? Or is this special?

Haven't heard of this...

leahvonleah

Has 16 years experience.

I did not mean for it to sound "special". It is an ad in nursing mags I have read (Advance for Nursing) that is an ad that states NP to MD- on your terms...whatever that means. I have never called the number. The next time I see it, I will post the additional info.

jla623

Specializes in SICU/CVICU.

Hmmm I am very interested to know what that entails.

bethem

Specializes in Med onc, med, surg, now in ICU!.

Is that that dodgy Oceania University thing in Samoa? Where you do your theory on line for the first year or something and then you organise your own clinicals? Yeah, they advertise in our Aussie journals too, but they say RN to MBBS (B Med/B Surg, as some of our unis have).

Oceania University medical grads are not eligible for registration in Australia, at least.

Sorry, I don't think there is any short cut to becoming an MD. If there were, I would take it in a heart beat!

christvs, DNP, RN, NP

Specializes in ACNP-BC. Has 12 years experience.

Is that that dodgy Oceania University thing in Samoa? Where you do your theory on line for the first year or something and then you organise your own clinicals? Yeah, they advertise in our Aussie journals too, but they say RN to MBBS (B Med/B Surg, as some of our unis have).

Oceania University medical grads are not eligible for registration in Australia, at least.

Sorry, I don't think there is any short cut to becoming an MD. If there were, I would take it in a heart beat!

I looked into that NP to MD ad, and it does refer to Oceania Univ in Samao. This is just my opinion, but that program sounds very sketchy to me. I just became an NP recently and also love what I do. But every so many months, I too think about medical school. I just don't think I have it in me to do like 2 years of chem/physics pre-reqs, then 4 years of med school, and then residency. I love school and all, but I have been in school forever (have 2 Master's degrees now). But still, i know what you mean! It's exciting to think about it.

hospicenp

Specializes in Critical care, gerontology, hospice. Has 37 years experience.

I never thought I would say this, because I have been a nurse forever and love being a nurse. But after being an NP and being in situations where I was unsure of a diagnosis or treatment course, I have wished I went to medical school. Not that I wish I were an MD, but that I had more knowledge, and believe me I study all the time. But there is a depth that I didn't get in NP school that I wish I had.

If you want to be an MD, than go to medical school, but do NOT go through that Samoa program. There is no short cut to becoming a physician and if you completed that program, all you would have at the end is a piece of paper in your hand stating that you completed a program with two more letters at the end of your name that mean nothing to anyone else. You have to go the whole way to become a doctor, and there is no way around that for ANYONE. The program you were looking at is just trying to take advantage of people, so be careful out there. There is no way you would ever be able to match and no way you would ever be able to practice, at least in the US.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

I have never considered being an MD simply because nursing was already a second career. However, I see nothing wrong with an RN to MD. I know several and they are the physicians I feel bring something extra to the board.

Like above posters have said: just as there are no shortcuts to nursing, there are no shortcuts to being an MD.

Good luck with your decision.

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB. Has 30 years experience.

I seriously considered med school at one point in my APN career. Even was accepted, but before I formally accepted this, I had a serious heart-to-heart talk with myself (and, sought out the opinions of other physician-colleagues and APNs), then turned down the invitation. I decided my nursing career was satisfactory and I was where I needed to be.

Not one thing wrong with the nurse desiring to become MD. Seriously research this; decide what motivates you to become a physician. And, as pointed out, there are no short-cuts.

I wish you luck with your decisions.

I seriously considered med school at one point in my APN career. Even was accepted, but before I formally accepted this, I had a serious heart-to-heart talk with myself (and, sought out the opinions of other physician-colleagues and APNs), then turned down the invitation. I decided my nursing career was satisfactory and I was where I needed to be.

Not one thing wrong with the nurse desiring to become MD. Seriously research this; decide what motivates you to become a physician. And, as pointed out, there are no short-cuts.

I wish you luck with your decisions.

Considering the fact that few doctors are entering into primary care at this time, there will be a need for NP's to fill those positions. A medical student from the U of Virginia informed me that only 6 out of 160 people in his graduating class (May 2008) were going into family practice. There are even fewer (if any) at Baylor Medical School. Although, the vast majority of DO students enter family practice residencies...maybe b/c that's all they can get into??

I've heard of several programs located in foreign countries that allow NP's/PA's to become a medical doctor in 2 years. I've received letters from a couple of those schools myself. One is the Universidad de Guadalajara (must speak Spanish) and the other one is in the Dominican Republic. Of course, getting into a residency in the United States after graduation may be tough. However, Texas accepts those physicians, even though most of the states won't. Furthermore, a physician doesn't HAVE to go through a residency in order to practice. I know of a few that never finished or even started a residency, however they can't get board certified and very few insurance companies or hospitals will credential them. I'm always amazed that these "doctors" are actually allowed to practice in the U.S. As far as I'm concerned, I'm just as qualified to practice "medicine" as they are...surgery is something else though.

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

As far as I'm concerned, I'm just as qualified to practice "medicine" as they are...surgery is something else though.

I think you're somewhat misguided if you genuinely think you are as qualified to practice medicine after completing an advanced nursing degree as someone who completed medical school. It's just an entirely different training.

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care. Has 27 years experience.

Furthermore, a physician doesn't HAVE to go through a residency in order to practice. I know of a few that never finished or even started a residency, however they can't get board certified and very few insurance companies or hospitals will credential them. I'm always amazed that these "doctors" are actually allowed to practice in the U.S.

Actually all 50 states require at least 1 year of post-graduate training or residency for all US-trained physicians (MD or DO) to be allowed a license to practice. The requirement is higher for FMG's or foreign medical graduates (from 2 years and higher in some states). http://www.medlicense.com/state_medical_license_requirements.html

I think you're somewhat misguided if you genuinely think you are as qualified to practice medicine after completing an advanced nursing degree as someone who completed medical school. It's just an entirely different training.

You might try taking the statement in context.

David Carpenter, PA-C

Actually all 50 states require at least 1 year of post-graduate training or residency for all US-trained physicians (MD or DO) to be allowed a license to practice. The requirement is higher for FMG's or foreign medical graduates (from 2 years and higher in some states). http://www.medlicense.com/state_medical_license_requirements.html

This is probably a little more definitive:

http://www.fsmb.org/usmle_eliinitial.html

Note South Dakota now requires completion of a residency. This is recommended by the FSMB and probably the way most states are going.

David Carpenter, PA-C

I think you're somewhat misguided if you genuinely think you are as qualified to practice medicine after completing an advanced nursing degree as someone who completed medical school. It's just an entirely different training.

I'm comparing my education to a foreign trained doctor from one of those "medical schools" I described. I know I can't possibly compare my education to a U.S. medical school.

I was pre-med/Biology BS before I EVER thought of becoming a NP.

I got accepted to Medical School in Germany, before I decided to become an NP.

During my accelerated BSN i thought of Medical School, and a few friends told me I should do it.

At the beginning of my NP program I spend ~$300 on books/cd's to study for the MCAT and got info about schools etc.

Then i read, Med schools don't like if you start something and dont' finish, and there is NO guarantee that you will get in, so I just finished my FNP program in Dec.

Now again I am really thinking about Medical school again, and like another poster, mainly for the knowledge. But also for the fact that if I did it, I would enter a different field like Surgery, Sports Medicine, or Anesthesia. I never thought I would like surgery but now it seems pretty cool.

I was 23 when i turned down med school, and I am 28 now.

I thought family practice would be good enough but now i'm not so sure...

This is probably a little more definitive:

http://www.fsmb.org/usmle_eliinitial.html

Note South Dakota now requires completion of a residency. This is recommended by the FSMB and probably the way most states are going.

David Carpenter, PA-C

Very interesting. I wonder why New Mexico and Washington require more training for a MD than a DO? It seems like the rules are more lax regarding DO's as well...look how many states let them take their exams an unlimited number of times!

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.