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Cons of WGU

Just curious if there were any complaints about the program for RN-BSN at WGU? I am unhappy with my current school and realize it will take much longer to finish my degree than I would like. Also how difficult is the statistics class? Thanks

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

The primary complaint is the GPA issue. Since it's pass/fail, they don't give a "traditional" GPA which can be difficult for matriculation.

As I am not planning on enrolling in a doctoral program or a post-master's program of any type, that's not really a con for ME, but others have expressed that concern (although it seems mostly a non-concern for most programs, as I haven't actually heard of anyone not getting into a program). Other than that, I honestly can't think of any cons, unless you are the type of person who needs the structure of deadlines in order to get things done.

Thank you so much for your help! At this point I don't intend on getting my MSN... So I feel like WGU would be a good for for me... Just worried about the statistics course for the most part... Feel like anything else I would be alright with. 😊

I thought I saw some posts about the statistics course recently that indicated it is not 'impossible'. Look around, maybe you can find them too. Don't think you have anything to worry about there.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

I agree with Cali. I didn't take stats at WGU, but from what I've read, it's 98% theory, and 2% math. I wouldn't worry.

SquishyRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER, Trauma, Med-Surg/Tele, LTC.

The primary complaint is the GPA issue. Since it's pass/fail, they don't give a "traditional" GPA which can be difficult for matriculation.

As I am not planning on enrolling in a doctoral program or a post-master's program of any type, that's not really a con for ME, but others have expressed that concern (although it seems mostly a non-concern for most programs, as I haven't actually heard of anyone not getting into a program). Other than that, I honestly can't think of any cons, unless you are the type of person who needs the structure of deadlines in order to get things done.

This the only reason I didn't go with WGU. Otherwise, I think it would have been perfect for me.

There are many student who have moved on to higher education regardless of the way WGU grades.

I plan to attend the pre-licensing BSN program and plan to move on to MSN NP.

I have heard nothing but Great things about the school and if any student wished to move on to higher education at another institution, I don't see why they couldn't. Just check with the school of choice and they can tell you whether they accept them or not.

featherzRN, MSN

Specializes in Outpatient/Clinic, ClinDoc.

I did stats at WGU and thought it was easy. However, I do well in math. I can say, however, that I don't think it's possible to have an easier 'stats' class - it's still stats, which is difficult to 'get', but there's not really any 'math' just concepts, definitions, etc.

Thank you for breaking us down. I think I'm pretty much sold on going to WGU. I'll probably reach out to you all for help with this statistic once I get there. 😊 thanks again for the advice. I will take all I can get!

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

We're here for you! This is a very supportive group. :)

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

Just worried about the statistics course for the most part...

I passed the WGU statistics course last month as part of their RN-to-BSN program. My math skills are definitely not up to par, but I was able to easily pass this stats class because it is extremely introductory. It consists of all theory, definitions, and rules. It had no calculations whatsoever.

Yeah, don't fear stats. Limiting yourself to BSN programs that don't include a statistics class is going to majorly limit your options, and WGU's class is not bad.

WGU has a lot of double-edged swords. It's very cheap if you can get through in one semester, similar to my state school's online program if you go two semesters, and more expensive if it takes longer than that. Same with time - going beyond two semesters gives no time advantage over the state school. However, even though I'm going to take three semesters, I still think WGU was a good choice, because the circumstances that led it to take that long would have made it difficult to do a less flexible program.

I agree with klone that it may not the best program for people who work best under deadlines (that's me!).

It's obviously not a great program for people who need lots of in-person support, study groups, and that sort of thing. Even if you have other people locally doing WGU, the self-paced nature means that you quite likely aren't going to work on everything at the same time. Since everything, textbooks, library, and all, is online, it isn't a good choice for someone who really doesn't do well with computers. But that probably doesn't apply to anyone reading this :)

Other than that, and the pass/fail grading, I think the main drawback is that you're going to run into people who simply aren't going to take it as seriously as a degree from a brick and mortar school, even if the B&M schools program is totally online, too. And that person may be the person doing the hiring/admissions.

featherzRN, MSN

Specializes in Outpatient/Clinic, ClinDoc.

Other than that, and the pass/fail grading, I think the main drawback is that you're going to run into people who simply aren't going to take it as seriously as a degree from a brick and mortar school, even if the B&M schools program is totally online, too. And that person may be the person doing the hiring/admissions.

Could totally be true.. That said, my 20+ years ago ADN is from Excelsior (online school with no clinicals! :p) and I have never once had difficulty finding employment. Wasn't even mentioned. So unless you are trying for a highly competitive slot my guess is there will be no issue. The main 'con' with WGU is the 3.0 GPA - but as I don't have plans to 'move up', this was not an issue for me.

I agree. I did choose WGU, so obviously people's incorrect perceptions weren't a deterrent for me. As far as I can tell, hospitals around here want just an accredited BSN. And since plenty of WGU people have gotten into programs for higher degrees, I'm not too worried about that.

But it is a potential Con to take into consideration.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

But it is a potential Con to take into consideration.
Very true. Some old-fashioned HR manager might toss the employment application into file number 13 (a.k.a. the circular wastebasket) if a school with a heavy online presence is listed. However, I think these types of managers are becoming rarer as online education grows in popularity and acceptance.

My former chief nursing officer earned his MSN degree online from Walden U, and a former director of nursing education earned her MSN degree online from U of Phoenix, so I think the online degree stigma is slowly disappearing into thin air.

You all are so knowledgeable!! Thank you thank you!! On average how long does each course take someone to complete? I know it based on competency... Just wondering ☺

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

Totally depends on how many tasks there are. I can generally submit one task a week, with between 4-8 hours spent on the task (I pretty much only do homework on Saturdays, the other days I just try not to think about school). So if the course only has 1 or 2 tasks, I am able to finish it in a couple weeks. I'm working on two courses in my last two weeks of this semester - each course only has one task/paper, so I plan to finish both (2 credit) classes in under two weeks. Another class had 5 tasks, and that class took 2 1/2 months for me to finish (with a bit of procrastination).

If you do schoolwork more than one day a week, then you should easily be able to do 2-3 classes per month.

It really varies from person to person and from course to course. Some courses many people can complete in a few days, or even a few hours (Care of the Older Adult, Information Management). Others necessarily take, at a minimum, several weeks (the Community Health practicum).

But basically, you need a class every 1-2 weeks to get done in one semester (assuming you need the typical 34ish units), ever 2-4 weeks for two semesters, and 4-6 weeks for 3 semesters.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

You all are so knowledgeable!! Thank you thank you!! On average how long does each course take someone to complete? I know it based on competency... Just wondering ☺
It depends on your motivational level and how much free time you have. I can complete one course in the matter of a couple of weeks. One of our regular posters, featherzRN, completed 50 credits in less than four months.

I have the motivation to get this degree completed asap... Just not a whole lot of free time... I'm currently enrolled in a RN-BSN program online and am only able to take 2 x 3 credit hr courses. Working full time with 2 children. I love the way WGU allows terms of courses just not sure I can complete more than 2 in the term.. That would be more expensive than what I currently am doing. Arggggg decisions decisions lol😬

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