Conflict with Charge - 6 Month Review

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by Roggae Roggae Member

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CanadianAbroad

CanadianAbroad

176 Posts

This is a Charge who has been given way too much power. This has created an ego nurse, that is thinking about herself and not her patients. It reminds me of a story that happened with my Mom. She was a newer nurse, but a pretty darn good one. She had conflict with the Charge due to the Charge just not liking her. This Charge would give negative reviews and tried numerous times to get my Mom fired. She insinuated my Mom was sleeping with the doctors on staff, and even said my Mom had a "whore walk". My Mom had an obvious limp due to having a tumor removed off her hip when she was a teen. It got so bad, in a meeting my Dad asked my Mom to remove her pants and show the Charge her surgery scars. Administration were horrified and promptly fired the Charge nurse for her behavior and allegations. The moral of this, hold your ground. Make sure you document every detail what is said and when, and what situation is going on. Remember she is a big fish in an extremely small pond. But her actions will eventually come back to bite her. I wouldn't take her to heart and I would take it with a grain of salt. If you have plans on moving, I would look into that. This job is no longer self serving and will break you if you stay. You seem to want more and frankly, deserve more. So remember my Mom and her pants down the next time you are faced with a situation like this. She held her ground and cleared her name, and you can do the same!!

Roggae

Roggae

15 Posts

CanadianAbroad - Thank you for sharing your mom's story. I'm sorry she went through something so horrific! I'm so pleased to hear everything ended in her favor. I'll remember her story.

I know I haven't been in the field all that long, but this is the first time I've ever had conflict in the workplace. It really dismays me how people can behave toward one another in a professional work environment. The charge and I are the same age and she's been a nurse for a shorter amount of time. This is her only nursing experience. I don't see her treating other people this way, but most of the people who work there have been there a long time and are from the area. I knew this kind of behavior existed, and realize I may face conflict again, so perhaps this situation is a good learning opportunity for me to address people who try to push me around (with cowboyardee's advice in mind). How can anybody get mad at anyone else for simply trying to abide a very appropriate policy? It kind of blows my mind.

She undoubtedly knows, and she allows it all to to on. Full-blown out-of -the-mind things like bringing a large dog in the unit just because a patient wants it to be there (and, I guess, nobody checked shots, vet papers, obedience training done, etc) do not happen routinely unless the whole totem pole knows about them. Smaller, "we're all family here" places are especially prone to that sort of evil.

This is interesting because yes, this hospital pride's itself with its "family feel." And no, the dog's records weren't checked as she didn't have any records - the patient and her dog were homeless. The argument was the dog had nowhere else to go and therefor my charge (not the one in question) and house supervisor permitted the dog to stay per the patient's request. Of course I had to remain the nurse, which was very uncomfortable for me, so I documented how that decision was made and did my best to limit my time in the room for the remainder of my shift.

But as far as my boss not knowing, I believe it's possible she doesn't understand the full breadth of the situation. Her eyes became wide when I told her my examples and she said, "oh boy, maybe I need to spend some time working with night shift." I didn't share my stories about the charge yelling at me to get out of the patient room while I was performing the dressing change, or the few times she's undermined me at the patient's bedside over ridiculous things that she was wrong about no less. I think it's important I share that with her too.

I agree with documenting - I've made a commitment to start documenting more thoroughly, and at least I can now add that I notified the manager and when. I have a follow up conversation with her scheduled for tomorrow and I'm going to tell her everything. I am going to confront the charge, but honestly I might prefer my boss to be involved while I do, so I'm going to see what she thinks.

There is a wealth of good advice in this thread, thank you! I wasn't aware of how easy going agency work is, and it's a good idea to perhaps take that route until we move next June. I'll look into it more. I will also look into transferring to the bigger hospital our community hospital is affiliated with - they have a tremendously better reputation. I wish I would have just applied there to begin with.

Edited by Roggae
added more info

MikeyT-c-IV

MikeyT-c-IV

Specializes in Vascular Access. Has 13 years experience. 237 Posts

I would give my 2 weeks notice now, do agency while I found another job.

YES! Don't allow them any more opportunity to "throw you under the bus!" If you've already practiced outside the scope of your license then you've already set yourself up for potential disaster.

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions. 4 Articles; 7,907 Posts

IMO, I agree with most of the posters here. This does not sound like a safe place to work...and the only person who can protect your license is YOU.

I'd consider getting out of Dodge while you can. Start looking for another position, and stay out of the line of fire as much as you can in the meantime.

nursesaysay

nursesaysay, LPN

Specializes in INTERNAL MEDICINE, PSYCH. Has 10 years experience. 21 Posts

LEAVE THIS JOB. What kind of hospital only has 1 doc in the building, of which whom doesn't respond to a code?! Think about your license.

Roggae

Roggae

15 Posts

YES! Don't allow them any more opportunity to "throw you under the bus!" If you've already practiced outside the scope of your license then you've already set yourself up for potential disaster.

I have not practiced outside my license. I have refused when the charge has told me to order and administer meds without talking to the doctor. The only times I have gone along with anything outside of policy is when the charge and house supervisor overrided me, in which case I documented the circumstances heavily. The charge took my review as an opportunity to make her disatisfaction with me known for "disagreeing," and, "not following her advice," in these situations. Which is surprising to me since it demonstrates she doesn't seem to have insight that she is self incriminating.

But yes, I hear everyone on the getting out of dodge, it is sound advice. I'm looking into options while also documenting and preparing to disclose everything to the boss to see if she handlings the situation more directly.

Edited by Roggae

SororAKS, ADN, RN

Specializes in ER, ICU/CCU, Open Heart OR Recovery, Etc. Has 12 years experience. 1 Article; 720 Posts

Go online and get a copy of your state Nurse Practice Act as well. Look for direct relevancies to the examples you have and point this out to your boss. Keep personal copies of all this. Also keep personal documentation of all conversations you have, names, dates, responses. If this hospital is affiliated within a larger system, that gives you options if you feel you have exhausted all of them where you are.

Out of curiosity, is there a clause in your state Nurse Practice Act that requires reporting instances of possible violations of it to the BON?

I am also wondering if the larger hospital system has a confidential corporate integrity hotline. Not the only option you have, just a thought.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience. 6,895 Posts

" No doctor on site = not a hospital" is so NOT TRUE. The situation described by OP is normal for small rural facilities.

I realize that nurses in this setting are OUTSTANDING as to the care they provide. I also can perform all the interventions the uber-generalist nurses provide. I want a doctor's order BEFORE I do so.

One of my first posts here , was regarding there was no physician onsite to interpret an EKG for a patient with chest pain. I was directed to fax the EKG to a cardiologist. I was not willing to wait for interpretation.. when time is wasted while the heart muscle is dying.

I broke my contract the next day. I was NOT going to compromise my license and my patient's safety... because there was no doctor on site.

OP has got to do what she see's fit... I chose to get outta dodge.

Edited by Been there,done that

Wrench Party

Wrench Party

Specializes in Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Surgical. Has 3 years experience. 823 Posts

&%% this place. It sounds like you're making sound nursing judgments, you've prevented some medical errors from some dangerous coworkers, and you know how to nurse after a few years of working in a Level 1 trauma center.

The ER doc doesn't even come to your codes? Eesh!

People don't know what they don't know, in addition to their codes having poor outcomes. I would get out of there ASAP!!

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 25 years experience. 20,962 Posts

I would worry more about what losing your license for the dangerous, untenable situations you are constantly in, more---much more---than I would about perceived "job hopping".

Leave. Quit. Get out. Move on. Don't disparage the place or the people, just say it was not a good fit for your career goals. Simple as that.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience. 6,895 Posts

I have not practiced outside my license. I have refused when the charge has told me to order and administer meds without talking to the doctor. The only times I have gone along with anything outside of policy is when the charge and house supervisor overrided me, in which case I documented the circumstances heavily. The charge took my review as an opportunity to make her disatisfaction with me known for "disagreeing," and, "not following her advice," in these situations. Which is surprising to me since it demonstrates she doesn't seem to have insight that she is self incriminating.

But yes, I hear everyone on the getting out of dodge, it is sound advice. I'm looking into options while also documenting and preparing to disclose everything to the boss to see if she handlings the situation more directly.

" The only times I have gone along with anything outside of policy is when the charge and house supervisor overrided me." This is not about internal policy and this is not about supervision over- rided you. This is about YOU intervening without a physician order.

ComeTogether, LPN

Specializes in Keeping my head above water. Has 7 years experience. 1 Article; 2,157 Posts

Run, Ruuuuunnnnn.

3 jobs in 2 years is better than no licence. :(