Public Health/Community Clinical Nurse Specialist - page 2

What type of roles do you have? Administrative, educator, or clinician? Thanks for sharing, there doesn't seem to be too many of us around. :)... Read More

  1. by   mmcgill
    Sycamorestudent -Think we got away from the original question. Let me rephrase, a CNS (in a majority of states is recognized as an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN). A RN with a MPH is not an APRN.
  2. by   mmcgill
    Thanks Mary for the clarification in the matter.
  3. by   SycamoreGuy
    Quote from mmcgill
    Sycamorestudent -Think we got away from the original question. Let me rephrase, a CNS (in a majority of states is recognized as an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN). A RN with a MPH is not an APRN.
    I understand that in theory, But in practice does a Public Health CNS truly act as a APRN or are they in more of a change agent role? I'm really not familiar with the specialty at all. If it is the latter, i.e. not diagnosing or writing prescriptions, it seems a RN with a MPH could fill the role.
  4. by   mmcgill
    Quote from SycamoreStudent
    I understand that in theory, But in practice does a Public Health CNS truly act as a APRN or are they in more of a change agent role? I'm really not familiar with the specialty at all. If it is the latter, i.e. not diagnosing or writing prescriptions, it seems a RN with a MPH could fill the role.
    They can, depends on the job description of whichever employer is hiring. The good thing about the CNS role is that you can do either or. You are right if you are not wanting to do the APRN role then MPH would be ok. My wife is similar. She is doing her MHA, but I told her she should have done an Advanced Practice type schooling, that way she would have more options. We have a lot of APRN's in administrative roles at our hospital. However, if you are certain that the APRN role is not for you then MPH would be fine. Note as well, that I am an Adult acute and critical care CNS, verified through the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, this covers a wide variety of patients, which provides more marketability. Overall, until all states are standardized, the CNS role will continue to confuse people. Hope this helps
  5. by   One4All
    Hello bloggers,

    You probably thought I died or something....no, just some life changing experiences! Thank you for the continued interest in APRNs. I am a PHCNS because I took the national certification exam and became licensed in my state as an APRN. My work has been public health clinic management and all that goes along with it....staffing, recruiting, training, protocols, patient education and case management, QA/QI, risk management, PCMH etc. After many years in PH I am moving to a new field----Psychiatric Nursing---as I work toward my PMHNP. I look forward to joining some new groups of currently practicing Psych RNs, CNSs, and NPs.

    For anyone interested in PHCNS - they were removed as part of the changes with scope and practice. Any nurse can now take an Advanced Public Health Nurse certification, but a masters degree is not required and you can no longer become an APN in your state with it. Those of us who still exist under the old system are still APRNs as long as we maintain licensure requirements for our state.
    I wish the best to you all on your nursing journeys!
  6. by   One4All
    "What lies before us and what lies behind us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us." Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Quote from One4All
    Hello bloggers,
    You probably thought I died or something....no, just some life changing experiences! Thank you for the continued interest in APRNs. I am a PHCNS because I took the national certification exam and became licensed in my state as an APRN. My work has been public health clinic management and all that goes along with it....staffing, recruiting, training, protocols, patient education and case management, QA/QI, risk management, PCMH etc. After many years in PH I am moving to a new field----Psychiatric Nursing---as I work toward my PMHNP. I look forward to joining some new groups of currently practicing Psych RNs, CNSs, and NPs.

    For anyone interested in PHCNS - they were removed as part of the changes with scope and practice. Any nurse can now take an Advanced Public Health Nurse certification, but a masters degree is not required and you can no longer become an APN in your state with it. Those of us who still exist under the old system are still APRNs as long as we maintain licensure requirements for our state.
    I wish the best to you all on your nursing journeys!
  7. by   Mia415
    Lol I disagree - APRN can certainly practice medicine. Not all APRNs do... But ya they can!
  8. by   habbas1
    I know this is a little dated, but I am really interested in getting a graduate degree in community health nursing. Is there a difference in Advanced Population Health vs Advanced Public Health?
  9. by   SiwanRN
    Quote from habbas1
    I know this is a little dated, but I am really interested in getting a graduate degree in community health nursing. Is there a difference in Advanced Population Health vs Advanced Public Health?
    I don't really have a good answer for your question, but it might be helpful to know that ANCC retired the APHN-BC board certification credential. Anyone who applied for it before October of last year I think has the option to still do the portfolio review to get the credential, but they are no longer taking new applications. You can only renew the credential if you already have it. That makes me bitter because I wanted it, but oh well. Hopefully my experience and education will speak for themselves when I look to move into more advanced roles in public health after my graduate degree is completed.
  10. by   habbas1
    Thank you or you insight! that's honestly shocking to me because I feel that there is an increased need for nurses with a focus in public health.
  11. by   SiwanRN
    There sure is. There are other public health certifications that someone can get (CPH, CHES, MCHES, etc) but that was the only nursing-specific one. Boooooo.
  12. by   One4All
    Good question...sorry for delay in answering. Thanks to colleague below for discussion lead.

    I took the ANCC specialty exam to become an ANCC board certified Clinical Nurse Specialist in 2008 after completing my Advanced Community Health Nursing degree (MSN). This allowed me to become licensed as an Advanced Practice Nurse (CNS) in my state. Unfortunately this national board exam no longer exists. I am able to maintain my certification and licensure as long as I continue to obtain scope related continuing education and renew my certification in a timely manner. The certification can now be at a bachelor or Master level but you are not able to become an advanced practice nurse anymore.

    My ACHN graduate degree is less common now due to changes in advance practice nursing and the public health transitional focus to the MPH generalist degree. Anyone can earn an MPH degree. As a nurse, my public health scope was always as a public health nurse which is why I did not choose an MPH.

    The last two years I have been receiving additional training to transition to the scope of Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. I will graduate in May and take a new board exam for PMHNP which will involve a change in my Advanced Practice Nursing licensure.

    I will always have a passion for public health. I have just found a much needed specialty of practice where I can still apply population based health and work with an individual focused direct care context.
  13. by   One4All
    Hi PF,

    It is good to know there are others out there passionate about public health. Since my original posting, there have been considerable changes in advance practice nursing related to the PHCNS. See my more lengthy posting about this these changes.

    I am wondering if I will continue to maintain my PHCNS certification with a new scope a practice nearly completed as a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner.

    Hang in there and keep up the passion!

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