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Public Health/Community Clinical Nurse Specialist

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by One4All One4All (New) New

What type of roles do you have? Administrative, educator, or clinician? Thanks for sharing, there doesn't seem to be too many of us around. :)

Edited by One4All
sp

SycamoreGuy

Has 1 years experience.

Haven't seen a lot of these, I'm curious, what would be the difference between a public health CNS and a RN with a MPH?

passionflower, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Women’s health, Educator, Leadership. Has 29 years experience.

Don't know but since this is the direction I am hoping to go into it would be nice if somebody responds.

A Clinical Nurse Specialist is considered an advanced practice registered nurse in most states. If you are an RN with a MPH you are not an advanced practice nurse, therefore, you cannot practice medicine. Depends where you live, but in Oklahoma and Texas CNS's are widely used, with that being said if you have your CNS you can always go into other roles. Hope this helps.

Matthew McGill APRN-CNS,MSN,CCNS,CCRN

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 44 years experience.

No snark intended - but nurses do not 'practice medicine'. I suspect you meant something along the lines of prescriptive authority, but in no way shape or form do nurses 'practice medicine'.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Sorry, but APNs DO PRACTICE MEDICINE.

http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/documents/CAPNAH/files/36%20-%20White%20Paper%20-%20Status%20of%20APRNs%20in%20MO%202012.pdf

I assure you that my practice is medically based. You are right though in that prescriptive authority alone does not mean I practice medicine. Rather it is my level of assessment skills, ability to diagnose, order tests, interpret tests/labs and then (if needed) prescribe. I also write medical orders in the hospital, perform medical H&Ps, consults and discharge summaries. All of these encompass practicing medicine.

Mary

I assure you APRN's (depending on state) can practice medicine. I work for a hospitalist group here in Oklahoma at Integris Baptist. In the state of Oklahoma, Advanced Practice Registered Nurses can indeed practice medicine. TraumaRUs, thanks for the back up. No snark taken. By the way prescribing medications, diagnostic orders, referrals, ect. are all a part of practicing medicine.

Matthew McGill APRN-CNS,MSN,CCNS,CCRN

Psychcns

Specializes in Psychiatric Nursing. Has 30 years experience.

Mary

I assure you APRN's (depending on state) can practice medicine. I work for a hospitalist group here in Oklahoma at Integris Baptist. In the state of Oklahoma, Advanced Practice Registered Nurses can indeed practice medicine. TraumaRUs, thanks for the back up. No snark taken. By the way prescribing medications, diagnostic orders, referrals, ect. are all a part of practicing medicine.

Matthew McGill APRN-CNS,MSN,CCNS,CCRN

I have thought being an APRN is practicing medicine for a long time. I do the same job as my psychiatrist counterpart. My different education gives me a different perspective.

However we are nurses regulated by boards of nursing. My license says I am a nurse. I am a psych CNS with prescriptive authority working as a psych NP.

Mary maybe right though. We can only practice some parts of medicine, but that goes for physicians as well.

What state do you work in Psychcns?

Psychcns

Specializes in Psychiatric Nursing. Has 30 years experience.

What state do you work in Psychcns?

MA and NH so far.

Licensed also in CT and OR-haven't worked there yet.

SycamoreGuy

Has 1 years experience.

Nevermind

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 44 years experience.

Again - no snark intended. But I would suggest that unless your activities are governed by the board of medicine in your state, you are not practicing medicine.

If you are governed by the board of nursing, you are practicing NURSING as an APN.

Sycamorestudent -Think we got away from the original question. Let me rephrase, a CNS (in a majority of states is recognized as an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN). A RN with a MPH is not an APRN.

Thanks Mary for the clarification in the matter.

SycamoreGuy

Has 1 years experience.

Sycamorestudent -Think we got away from the original question. Let me rephrase, a CNS (in a majority of states is recognized as an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN). A RN with a MPH is not an APRN.

I understand that in theory, But in practice does a Public Health CNS truly act as a APRN or are they in more of a change agent role? I'm really not familiar with the specialty at all. If it is the latter, i.e. not diagnosing or writing prescriptions, it seems a RN with a MPH could fill the role.

I understand that in theory, But in practice does a Public Health CNS truly act as a APRN or are they in more of a change agent role? I'm really not familiar with the specialty at all. If it is the latter, i.e. not diagnosing or writing prescriptions, it seems a RN with a MPH could fill the role.

They can, depends on the job description of whichever employer is hiring. The good thing about the CNS role is that you can do either or. You are right if you are not wanting to do the APRN role then MPH would be ok. My wife is similar. She is doing her MHA, but I told her she should have done an Advanced Practice type schooling, that way she would have more options. We have a lot of APRN's in administrative roles at our hospital. However, if you are certain that the APRN role is not for you then MPH would be fine. Note as well, that I am an Adult acute and critical care CNS, verified through the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, this covers a wide variety of patients, which provides more marketability. Overall, until all states are standardized, the CNS role will continue to confuse people. Hope this helps

Hello bloggers,

You probably thought I died or something....no, just some life changing experiences! Thank you for the continued interest in APRNs. I am a PHCNS because I took the national certification exam and became licensed in my state as an APRN. My work has been public health clinic management and all that goes along with it....staffing, recruiting, training, protocols, patient education and case management, QA/QI, risk management, PCMH etc. After many years in PH I am moving to a new field----Psychiatric Nursing---as I work toward my PMHNP. I look forward to joining some new groups of currently practicing Psych RNs, CNSs, and NPs.

For anyone interested in PHCNS - they were removed as part of the changes with scope and practice. Any nurse can now take an Advanced Public Health Nurse certification, but a masters degree is not required and you can no longer become an APN in your state with it. Those of us who still exist under the old system are still APRNs as long as we maintain licensure requirements for our state.

I wish the best to you all on your nursing journeys!