CLinical Nurse Expert

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Clinical Nurse Expert...Has anyone heard of this title? Not Clinical Nurse Lead or Clinical Nurse Specialist- Clinical Nurse Expert. As far as I know, it is a title that my hospital has created. It strikes me as odd that a hospital can create a title for a nurse that does not seem to exist in any literature. What do you think?

klone, MSN, RN

14,477 Posts

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 17 years experience.

I think I'm going to add that title to my business cards.

Klone K. Klone, Clinical Nurse Expert, Chlamydia and Gonorrhea

NanaPoo

762 Posts

Specializes in School Nursing, Hospice,Med-Surg. Has 18 years experience.

NanaPoo, Clinical Nurse Expert, Saltines & Fakers

Hoosier_RN, MSN

3,705 Posts

Specializes in dialysis. Has 30 years experience.

RNinIN, Clinical Nurse Expert, nursing n stuff

elkpark

14,633 Posts

Hospitals use all kinds of designations for nurses. It's not a big deal (IMO), as long as they're not using any kind of title that means a specific certification or level of education (that the individuals using the title don't have).

My employer uses "Nurse Clinician" a lot -- but it's confusing, because some departments use it to designate the Master's-prepared nurses, and some departments use it for generalist level nurses.

Hospitals often invent some kind of title (like this one) to recognize nurses that are higher up the clinical ladder (if there is one).

Jules A, MSN

8,863 Posts

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I agree with Elk its not a big deal in the designation realm but personally I think it sounds utterly ridiculous. My guess is its a back door way to have nurses without the CNL designation, which I'm no fan of either, working in that role without being compensated for it.

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llg, PhD, RN

13,469 Posts

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 46 years experience.

I agree that it is commonplace for hospitals to make up job titles -- and I realize they have to sometimes. But I wish they would do some research and pick job titles that are consistent with industry trends. I don't expect complete uniformity, but I wish there was a little more consistency. We have too many titles -- and that confuses people.

sailornurse

1,231 Posts

Specializes in ER/Tele, Med-Surg, Faculty, Urgent Care. Has 39 years experience.

Yeah agree with PPs. One local facility had designated, "Clinical Nurse Preceptor" in smaller font. Problem was the badges also said, "CNP" in bigger letters. Had to call/write letter to DON explaining, CNP is protected title (my title on nursing license says, CNP) in our state so they got rid of the Clinical Nurse Preceptor/changed it to Preceptor. OP-who is designated a Clinical Nurse Expert?

Pprwrk

18 Posts

I also think that it is a way to have someone in a role 'like' a CNL so that it looks better for the facility. I will be trying to clarify the role with the higher-ups tomorrow. I think that if that goal was to have a nurse 'act' as a CNL without being a CNL, is really crappy for nursing as a profession, for the nurses being 'served' by the 'expert', and ultimately for the patients as well. If the role is up to me to basically define, then I would align it with the CNL role, but how is that good for nursing or for patients if I were to practice each day as a CNL, without the education/degree? I don't know how a facility can get away with creating a role in order to fill a gap/need that they can't or won't fill; creating a role that might look good on paper, but isn't actually meeting the objectives that would be focused on by a properly educated CNL.

allnurses Guide

llg, PhD, RN

13,469 Posts

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 46 years experience.

I can understand that employers need to create new job titles because they need work done and they have people capable of doing it -- but don't have anyone with the exact certification or degree title. Nursing creates so many new degree programs, roles, etc. so often that there are always new titles/roles/etc. out there that only a few people have. The CNL is a great example. The things that CNLs are educated to do have been a part of nursing practice for years -- and while I like the degree, you don't need a CNL degree to do that type of work. And it is unreasonable to expect that all those people with MSN's that are more than 10 years old are going to stop doing that type of work that they have been doing all those years. It takes time for a new degree to spread across the country and it's silly to discard all those capable people who don't have the "currently fashionable" degree title. Usually, by the time the role/degree title speads across the whole nation, schools have discontinued those programs and come up with a new favorite.

Compare nursing to other fields. While they have varieties of specialties, they are pretty stable. Nursing is not. We are constantly creating new labels -- and in the process, we disenfranchise all those who graduated under the old degree titles. Ridiculous.

Jules A, MSN

8,863 Posts

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

Compare nursing to other fields. While they have varieties of specialties, they are pretty stable. Nursing is not. We are constantly creating new labels -- and in the process, we disenfranchise all those who graduated under the old degree titles. Ridiculous.

And imo look like ninnies to the rest of the world.

joanna73, BSN, RN

1 Article; 4,767 Posts

Specializes in geriatrics.

Our nurse educators were called practice development leaders for a while. Finally, the title was revised again to clinical nurse educator because people were confused and not applying for the postings.