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Chiropracter orders?

Posted

I had a parent bring in a supplement that she wants me to give to her daughter, along with a written directive by her chiropracter as to what and when to give it. Your thoughts?

Farawyn

Has 25 years experience.

The supplement must be given during the school day?

What is it?

Farawyn

Has 25 years experience.

Here is what I found for NY based school nurses. I would go to your state website:

(Copy and pasted)

[COLOR=#000000][COLOR=#0066ff]NOTES / EXCUSES[/COLOR] [/COLOR]

[COLOR=#000000]

Can notes be accepted from acupuncturists?

You can accept orders from
physician or dentist
if it is in their scope of practice as defined below from the office of professions. A certified acupuncturist is a licensed physician or dentist who has completed at least 200 hours of instruction in programs in acupuncture registered by the department, or in programs determined by the department to be the equivalent of registered programs, and at least 100 hours of supervised experience acceptable to the department. This information can be found on the NYSED Office of Professions found at the following link:
[COLOR=#000000]http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/acu/[/COLOR]
.

Can notes be accepted from chiropractors?

The Office of Professions at the State Education Department has offered some guidance on the issue of chiropractic care for school age children. School nurses are able to accept notes from chiropractors that relate to their scope of practice. This would mean that a school nurse may accept a physical education excuse or scoliosis evaluation, but would not be able to accept a physical examination form or a note related to treatment of a communicable disease. If there is a question about the specific order, check with the school medical director for guidance. The information regarding scope of practice for chiropractors from the Office of Professions can be found at the following link:
[COLOR=#000000]http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/chiro/[/COLOR]

Can notes be accepted from physical therapists?

School nurses are able to accept notes from physical therapists that relate to their scope of practice. You may accept a note from the PT if the diagnosing physician indicated in writing that the PT could clear the student based on their assessment or specific guidelines. Information regarding the scope of practice for physical therapists from the Office of Professions may be found at
[COLOR=#000000]http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/pt/[/COLOR]

A physical therapist may provide a letter or report indicating that the physical therapy treatment has been completed. Depending on the nature of the injury and the required treatment, it may be possible in some circumstances for a physical therapist to indicate that a student may return to activity, especially if the physical therapist is the one who removed the student from activity and has provided treatment pursuant to the direct access provisions of Education Law section 6731(d). If a physician or other referring professional directs that the student return to him or her for evaluation before returning to activity, the physical therapist would not be authorized to return the student to activity. Additionally, a school district may choose to require that return to activity clearances come from a physician.

Can notes be accepted from podiatrists?

A podiatrist, may clear a student for an injury or condition related to feet. "
A podiatrist is a doctor of podiatric medicine (DPM) who is a licensed health care professional who diagnoses, treats, operates and prescribes for any disease, injury, deformity, or other condition of the foot."
Podiatrists can treat any condition of the feet, such as the following:

  • injuries to bones (including fractures), tendons and soft tissue


  • foot problems resulting from illness such as diabetes, arthritis, AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases


  • bacterial and fungal infections


  • skin and nail disorders


  • benign and cancerous tumors


  • congenital and acquired foot deformities

Information regarding the scope of practice for podiatrists from the Office of Professions may be found at
[COLOR=#000000]http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/pod/[/COLOR]

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OldDude

Specializes in Pediatrics.

Our policy used to be that we would adhere to a doctor order; pretty much regardless of how ridiculous we thought it was. But with the onslaught of "essential oils" (whatever that really is) being used to cure everything from toe fungus to ADHD we changed the school policy to read that the only way school personnel will administer any substance is the substance has to be approved by the FDA for use with that particular diagnosis. I think the PA order to rub XYZ oil on little Johnny's temples and abc oil on his neck at lunch for ADHD was the straw that broke the camel's back.

Yeah, we don't even allow petroleum jelly. So, no . . . I would not do this.

I will admit to a personal bias against the movement towards naturopaths and holistic therapy. This just doesn't belong in schools though. Aren't we busy enough?

Windchaser22

Specializes in School nurse. Has 5 years experience.

Is it necessary to take it 4 times a day? If not then they can dose at home. If it's not FDA approved, then no unless serious extenuating circumstances exist like participation in a clinical trial.

Farawyn

Has 25 years experience.

Yeah, we don't even allow petroleum jelly. So, no . . . I would not do this.

I will admit to a personal bias against the movement towards naturopaths and holistic therapy. This just doesn't belong in schools though. Aren't we busy enough?

Me as well. The bias, I mean.

If an order comes in, run it past your district/school medical director.

Or maybe the mom can come up and administer it to her kid. I know in MY school the parents would have no problem rushing up to do that!

Well....now that I have eyeballed the supplement, I see that it has more caffeine than a can of Red Bull, and says it's not recommended for kids under 18. No way! Thanks for the input.

Farawyn

Has 25 years experience.

Bwahahahaha!

Medical purpose is...?

Bwahahahaha!

Medical purpose is...?

ADHD.

Me as well. The bias, I mean.

If an order comes in, run it past your district/school medical director.

Or maybe the mom can come up and administer it to her kid. I know in MY school the parents would have no problem rushing up to do that!

We have no medical director. I'm it. :whistling:

lifelearningrn, BSN, RN

Specializes in School Nursing. Has 6 years experience.

Wow, they specialize in ADHD now?

i thought caffeine WAS a treatment for ADHD.....

I think the PA order to rub XYZ oil on little Johnny's temples and abc oil on his neck at lunch for ADHD was the straw that broke the camel's back.

I love this OldDude! You are speaking my language. If I have to hear about Essential Oils one more time, I am gonna pull my hair out!!...oh, well it is getting gray anyway!!! I have already changed my med. permission portion of the Health Enrollment form for next year, for OTC meds for next year. To specifically say that "Essential Oils are not FDA approved and will not be administered"

That is a great idea!

I have family and friends who use essential oils and other homeopathic "stuff". Including a daughter-in-law who is looking for a "crunchy" pediatrician when they move to Texas in a couple of months. I have a 15 month old granddaughter and DIL uses homeopathic OTC meds with her (drops with melatonin to help her sleep).

OldDude

Specializes in Pediatrics.

They do smell good.

SnowyJ, RN

Has 28 years experience.

:roflmao:

Ridiculous. This essential oil thing is getting out of hand. I was in a store the other day and they had 2 "diffusers" going. After 15 minutes, I felt like my throat was closing up..Runny nose..Etc. I had to take a Benadryl. Too much of anything isn't good!

SnowyJ, RN

Has 28 years experience.

Oh, forgot to add, we do not allow "supplements" because generally they don't have FDA approval.