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Can you really become an NP in 4 years from scratch?

Posted

I met an NP earlier today and he was only 24 years old. He told me he went from an accountant to an NP in 4 years. I was completely shocked. He must've really had his game on. However, I'm wondering...how do you do all that in 4 years?

We didn't talk much and I don't think I'll see him around anytime soon, but he did tell me he started with the good 'ol ADN.

This means:

Year 1 - 1st year of ADN program

Year 2 - 2nd year of ADN program

Year 3 - RN-BSN or RN-MSN in 1 year or less

Year 4 - NP in 1 year-1.5 years?

I wish I had asked him which schools he attended to...

linearthinker, DNP, RN

Specializes in FNP. Has 25 years experience.

I wouldn't have thought so, but if he did it I guess it can be done.

PsychiatricNP

Has 3 years experience.

I went from social worker to NP in 38 months. I did an accelerated BSN program in 14 months, then went directly (started 1 week after graduating from BSN program) into an NP program (at a different school) for 24 months - start to finish it will have taken me 38 months, it can be accomplished with a lot of planning and hard work. There are ways to accomplish this a bit faster (direct entry master's programs).

bsnanat2

Specializes in ..

Possible with good planning, but not easy. I completed my BSN from scratch (only 3 college credits) in 23 months.

Depending on what college credits one has, what courses, etc., it is possible. I'm doing it!

I took 2 years of full-time classes (while working full-time) so I could get into a bridge program where I was able to do the BSN in one year and then the NP in one year. Very, very difficult. Requires lots of dedication and focus. Totally doable.

Everyone seems to have done the Accelerated BSN way. Judging from this guy, I think he started an ADN program at 20 years old, finished at 22, got into a ADN-MSN Direct Entry program and was able to get his MSN (Bypassing the BSN) and focus on his NP specialty - all within a 2 year time frame (including summers). Thus, he finished up at 24 years old. What a feat!

Le-Lee_FNP, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Nurse Practitioner. Has 4 years experience.

There are one year MSN NP programs for BSNs. Vanderbilt offers them in many specialties. If he is an accountant I assume he already has a Bachelors of some sort. An ADN only takes 2 years to get. so if he got a bsn after that it probably would only have been a semester to 1 year max. Then if he did a one year MSN theres your four years. definately doable!

I think it's totally possible to accomplish it but I wouldn't think you could actually retain all the information you needed to know to function at a NP position. Looks like there would be too much crammed into that time to really know what you were doing.

bsnanat2

Specializes in ..

I think it's totally possible to accomplish it but I wouldn't think you could actually retain all the information you needed to know to function at a NP position. Looks like there would be too much crammed into that time to really know what you were doing.

Isn't med school 4 years? Don't they retain enough to function? Isn't any BS degree 4 years?

I understand what you mean, but not relly a valid point. It depends on the individual. Some get a Phd and don't "know" squat and some are walking resources. Really though, as a practicing professional, doesn't one use resources and references? So how much one "retains" or can pull from memory is really not an issue.

tryingtohaveitall

Specializes in PICU. Has 23 years experience.

Isn't med school 4 years? Don't they retain enough to function? Isn't any BS degree 4 years?

I understand what you mean, but not relly a valid point. It depends on the individual. Some get a Phd and don't "know" squat and some are walking resources. Really though, as a practicing professional, doesn't one use resources and references? So how much one "retains" or can pull from memory is really not an issue.

One big difference is that the med school graduates are going to have years of residency ahead, whereas a new NP is expected to be able to function independently within a fairly short period of time.

Mimi2RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 27 years experience.

I'd like an NP to have some good basic nursing skills, experience which you get in the real world after nursing school. I feel the same way about new PA's, education but lacking in background. It doesn't matter how fast you get the paperwork done. That kind of self-confidence is scary!

bsnanat2

Specializes in ..

One big difference is that the med school graduates are going to have years of residency ahead, whereas a new NP is expected to be able to function independently within a fairly short period of time.

Still not a valid point. Even during that residency period MD grads are expected to function as physicians. The only difference is that they have mandatory oversight. The residency requirement still has nothing to do with the issue of recall that was raised. Hands are not held during residency. They, like NP's, are expected to know or expected to find the answer independently. Med school grads simply have a formal process in place to ensure that they do so. "I don't know" or "I don't recall" is no more acceptable for an intern/resident than it is for an NP. Any NP worth their salt is going to ensure that they get some experience under their belt before they go for total independence. Even then, smart NP's will have a network of resources and people to go to when necessary. Neither one (NP grad or MD grad) is going to know everything, but to say that one won't be able to recall what is necessary is not a good enough reason to invalidate this guy's accomplishment. I take my hat off to him. Whether or not he's any good at his job is up to him.

bsnanat2

Specializes in ..

I'd like an NP to have some good basic nursing skills, experience which you get in the real world after nursing school. I feel the same way about new PA's, education but lacking in background. It doesn't matter how fast you get the paperwork done. That kind of self-confidence is scary!

I reasoned the same way until I spoke to some NP's, all of which have many years of experience in the RN role and the NP role. What I have come to realize is that the roles are different. Yes, the right kind of RN experience is helpful, but it seems that it is not as important as some would like it to be. That thinking appears to be similar to the "everyone needs med-surg" thought. In speaking with them, they spoke of NP's who kept thinking like RN's and this is problematic. The individual seems to be the key. Some do need years of RN experience while others do not. I hope that you are an NP or NP student, otherwise it sounds like the ADN nurses who speak ill of BSN programs. Things change. If the person isn't any good at it, they won't last long. Hard work, dedication and proper training allows the one who accomplish this the right to at least give it a go. The biggest hurdle to NP's is not MD's, but other RN's. I don't have a MSN or DNP but I applaud those who do whether I ever get one or not.

tryingtohaveitall

Specializes in PICU. Has 23 years experience.

I am a PNP student, 3 quarters left til graduation and I can't imagine starting out as an NP with little/no bedside nursing experience. I have seen the ones in my classes with much less experience definitely have a harder time in our PNP program. There is so much I have learned over the years at the bedside.

iPink, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum. Has 8 years experience.

1 year ABSN program

1 year working as an RN

2 years to get the MSN, NP

Done in 4 years.