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Bad CPR techniques- do you say something?

Nurses   (975 Views | 19 Replies)

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

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5 hours ago, KatieMI said:

Yes, I love running codes. Sorry. 

Hats off; you're a better woman than I.  Not sorry.

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KatieMI has 6 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

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22 minutes ago, TriciaJ said:

Hats off; you're a better woman than I.  Not sorry.

Hats off for you, TriciaJ 🙂 I can run a code but I probably wouldn't ever manage anything acutely psychiatric outside of "Ativan/Versed/Precedex/Haldol/Zyprexa, just enough to keep 'im straight and off the vent"

Edited by KatieMI

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marienm, RN, CCRN has 6 years experience and specializes in Burn, ICU.

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We rotate compressors every time we do a pulse check. (Teaching hospital...shortage of bodies is not usually a problem.) We use the Zoll with feedback, and our code nurse team managers track all the data from every code and review a summary of it after the code with the staff and unit manager. Stuff like % of compressions with correct rate/depth/recoil. They will absolutely offer correction mid-code (even 2 minutes of bad CPR isn't helping anything) or pull someone off the chest if they can't do good compressions.

Regarding size of compressor...I had a patient who coded 3 separate times one night. Each time, the same nurse was the one to get ROSC. She's 5'4" and 130lbs. So it's not all about size...

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LibraNurse27 has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Community Health, Med/Surg, ICU Stepdown.

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I was kind of relieved to see the post about letting big strong guys do the first rounds... I am totally a feminist and believe women can do everything men can but in some cases strength really does matter. I am a small female and feel guilty asking male coworkers to help with things like turning, transfers, compressions, etc but I do want to protect patient safety... and my own back!

I have never gotten a frustrated response, one guy even told me he wanted to show off his muscles to impress a coworker he had a crush on! But back to the real topic... speaking up is always worth it if it can save a patient's life! I've heard quality compressions are the most important part of a code.

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On 2/12/2020 at 5:56 PM, Peditra said:

Hey all,

So I was thinking the other day when codes happen, sometimes you are doing CPR, others are, or all of you are rotating. Obviously I think about what other things I can do to help my fellow nurses and the patient, but I do find myself making observations of myself and others on technique. Some people don't do it hard enough (me, I think), some do it too low, some too fast, some seem really calm, others kind of not panicky, but the adrenaline is definitely going. One when I worked a nursing home, I saw this paramedic do compressions and I was thinking that they were the most perfect compressions I've ever seen. It was perfect depth, timing, calm, controlled, everything. And the guy never seemed tired, and frankly made it look "easy." And another nurse commented to me later on that they were thinking the same thing.

Now if you do see any bad techniques, do you ever say anything about it? I've never done it, but I know I've thought it.

Yes, you should say something if you see something that is not rights during CPR or ACLS.

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perc71 has 14 years experience as a BSN, MSN, APRN, NP.

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On 2/12/2020 at 3:56 PM, Peditra said:

Hey all,

So I was thinking the other day when codes happen, sometimes you are doing CPR, others are, or all of you are rotating. Obviously I think about what other things I can do to help my fellow nurses and the patient, but I do find myself making observations of myself and others on technique. Some people don't do it hard enough (me, I think), some do it too low, some too fast, some seem really calm, others kind of not panicky, but the adrenaline is definitely going. One when I worked a nursing home, I saw this paramedic do compressions and I was thinking that they were the most perfect compressions I've ever seen. It was perfect depth, timing, calm, controlled, everything. And the guy never seemed tired, and frankly made it look "easy." And another nurse commented to me later on that they were thinking the same thing.

Now if you do see any bad techniques, do you ever say anything about it? I've never done it, but I know I've thought it.

I agree with some other posts. Good chest compressions during codes is the most essential part during a cardio-pulmonary arrest. Depth, timing, and allowing adequate chest recoil during compression improves the patient's survival - inpatient or outpatient. That is why it is strongly advocated by the AHA to have closed loop communication and team members feedback. When you see wrong, please say something as a positive feedback or take over when the team member is showing signs of fatigue.

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ghillbert has 20 years experience as a MSN, NP and specializes in CTICU.

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Absolutely - hard and fast enough compressions are the key to meaningful survival after cardiac arrest. I couldn't count the number of times I told people to switch out because their compressions were ineffective.

 

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Thanks for  all your comments...I hesitate to say things sometimes to fellow nurses if I think they may react negatively, in order to preserve good co-workers relations. But CPR is a very important skill, and it's important to speak up. I am relieved to see so many nurses do not seem like they would get offended, but expect for themselves and others to speak up if this situation!

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