Bachelor of Science vs. Bachelor of Nursing

Posted
by vickiv13 (New) New

I just had a question regarding the difference between a Bachelor of Science and a Bachelor of Nursing. I went and got my Bachelor of Science and then went on to get my Associates Degree of Nursing. I was just wondering what the difference is class wise and if hospitals are strict about this. Any information would help, thanks.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience. 14,116 Posts

For hospitals that want a BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing), a BS in another area will not suffice. As far as classes covered in the BSN that aren't covered in the ADN - nursing leadership, community health and research, primarily.

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 10 years experience. 3,048 Posts

I have a Bachelor of Science-Biology, and Associates of Applied Science-Nursing and then I went got my Bachelor of Science-Nursing. Usually they are either Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts, with a content are after. There really is no Bachelor of Nursing degree per se. Hope that clarifies a little

ixchel

Specializes in critical care. 5 Articles; 4,547 Posts

I have a bachelor of science. The concentration of it is nursing. The distinction is we don't have a specific school of nursing. We have a school of science, and the degree itself had a few more science requirements than a BSN program might. My credential is written BS(N), RN or BS(N)-RN. It would be also accurate to write BS, RN, but I don't like it that way for probably obvious reasons.

ixchel

Specializes in critical care. 5 Articles; 4,547 Posts

For hospitals that want a BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing), a BS in another area will not suffice. As far as classes covered in the BSN that aren't covered in the ADN - nursing leadership, community health and research, primarily.

I think the OP is asking specifically about nursing programs that are only bachelor's of science, not bachelor's of science in nursing. It really is 6 one way, 1/2 dozen the other. It just depends on the structure of the school of science vs. school of nursing, and how the school applied for credentialing types. My school (as stated in my prior comment) is a bachelor of science, but I studied nursing for that bachelor of science. So my credential is BS(N).

Really all it is is semantics. That is it.

sailornurse

Specializes in ER/Tele, Med-Surg, Faculty, Urgent Care. Has 39 years experience. 1,231 Posts

Hello Ixchel, love you weekly what I learned posts. I am not familiar in schools such as you describe above. Is this in the US?

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience. 3,980 Posts

Here is a thread on the difference between Bachelor of Science with a Major in Nursing VS Bachelor of Science in Nursing. It all depends on the structure of the college/university. Essentially, a BS from either program is still BSN.

https://allnurses.com/registered-nurses-diploma/bachelor-of-science-816004.html

I have a Bachelor of Science with a Major in Nursing, but my work badge and paperwork from work says "BSN". There is no distinction between the two when it comes to Magnet status.

Edited by NICU Guy

ixchel

Specializes in critical care. 5 Articles; 4,547 Posts

Hello Ixchel, love you weekly what I learned posts. I am not familiar in schools such as you describe above. Is this in the US?

Thank you!

This is in the U.S. Basically if your university is structured so that your nursing department falls under the school of science, then you may be getting a bachelor of science. Your major would be nursing. That's what the BS(N) would stand for. If you look at my actual diploma, the word nursing isn't on it. It is, however, a valid degree in nursing and I met no resistance getting hired.

VXD4722

Specializes in Pediatrics. 46 Posts

The program I am currently taking is a Bachelor of Nursing (BN) degree, whereas most of the surrounding schools provide Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN). We're told that the only difference is the wording of the degree based on what the institution decides- there are essentially no differences in the curriculum of the two and doesn't impact our ability to sit for the NCLEX or become licensed from our governing body in any way.

RuchiThakur

1 Post

To begin a career in nursing, Bachelor in nursing program is one step forward work as RN (registered nurse) after passing licence test.

RN works in aged care, school nurse, medical center etc. Register nurses mostly work under doctors.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) graduates could include specialties like ICU nurse, emergency room nurse, operating room nurse, as well as charge nurse and registered nurses supervisor.

The Bachelor of Science spans the sciences, health sciences, technology and engineering systems. Bachelor of Science in Nursing is the first step towards a career in fields such as engineering, veterinary science or health practice, which can be pursued through further study. I hope that helps.

Cheers