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ASN vs BSN

ADN/BSN   (3,864 Views | 11 Replies)

1,416 Profile Views; 29 Posts

I recently graduated from school and am applying to accelerated BSN programs since this will be my second Bachelor's. I was wondering what the difference was between the ASN and BSN program in terms of content. I have also noticed a lot of ASN RN to BSN programs and have heard that ASN programs might be completely removed or nurses with ASN degrees will not be competitive in the job market. I was wondering why some people personally choose to get an ASN.

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JoseQuinones has 5 years experience.

281 Posts; 10,122 Profile Views

This discussion is a common one here on AN. Basically, the difference between ASN and BSN comes down to the classes in the second half of the degree. All RN programs take you as far as thE NCLEX. So these classes have to do with basic nursing competence, pharmacology, anatomy and physiology, and other things you need for the NCLEX. The ADN prepared nurse is a perfectly safe RN. Then for the BSN portion, usually you move into "softer" stuff like nursing research, health assessment, scope of practice, laws and regulations, team leadership, and stuff like that. In other words, the BSN includes more classes having to do with professional development. It also opens the door to continued education if you want to go on to a Master's. As to why I chose BSN over ADN, it is simply that I want to have the credentials to go into leadership and health promotion and for that I want to continue my education after my BSN, probably up to the DNP.

Many people go the ADN route because they need to get a job more quickly. You already have a Bachelor's, but for someone just starting out with all the generals to deal with, it may be too much. They get their license, start paying down their loans, and continue the BSN later.

Edited by JoseQuinones

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TheCommuter has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

4 Followers; 226 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 321,254 Profile Views

I was wondering why some people personally choose to get an ASN.

I 'stair-stepped' my way into nursing. I started as an LVN, then completed an LPN-to-RN bridge program that resulted in conferral of an ASN degree, and now I am 7 credits away from earning a BSN degree.

Why did I choose this route? I am a nontraditional student. When I first enrolled in the LVN program, I was a 23-year-old with mortgage payments and other obligations that dictated my absence from the workforce for no more than one year. Since the LVN program was 12 months in duration, it fit the bill.

I later enrolled in the LPN-to-ASN degree program because the scheduling enabled me to work full-time while attending school.

I am now enrolled in an online RN-to-BSN degree program that offers the convenience of enabling me to maintain full-time employment. While my path into nursing has consumed more time, things worked out well for me. I have no student loan debt, a great job with a nice salary and benefits, and a comfortable lifestyle, all as an ASN degree holder...

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classicdame is a MSN, EdD and specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

2 Articles; 7,255 Posts; 27,196 Profile Views

I got my ADN so I could get licensed ASAP and go to work. Then I worked on my BSN (with tuition assistance from my employer!). I learned more about critical thinking, leadership, statistics, group dynamics and other concepts in my BSN program. The ADN was mostly nursing skills, but nurses are so much more than that. Healthcare is challenging. Leaders need all the help they can get. Yes, many people are good nurses without BSN, but if you can do the job easier and less stressful because you have been taught certain methods, then why not make it easier on yourself?

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OBigdog26 has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP.

248 Posts; 7,256 Profile Views

Pay is the same. It would be beneficial for you to have a BSN if you want to further your nursing career and be more marketable. Also, a BSN is needed if you want to go back to grad school and pursue an APRN degree.

Sent from my iPhone using allnurses

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671 Posts; 11,110 Profile Views

The other difference is probably also some couldn't get into BSN right away due to the high completion of awesome GPA and test scores and BSN programs are somewhat more expensive than ASN.

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RedInScrubs has 3 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Medical-Surgial, Cardiac, Pediatrics.

136 Posts; 3,198 Profile Views

I chose an ADN program because I was a 24 year old single mother who wanted a more nontraditional environment and classmates who shared similar life experiences. I also wanted to get my LPN to make some money first while I finished my RN, and the two-year program here had that option.

I had the GPA to make a four-year program, but I wanted a cohort with more students like me, who had children or were on their second career.

I'm finishing my BSN online right now while working as an RN, and I'm finding that to be quite beneficial for me. I feel like I had a better support system and experience with the cohort I had and the opportunity to study individually on my own time now while getting work experience.

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SierraBravo has 3 years experience.

547 Posts; 8,351 Profile Views

If you can get into an accelerated BSN program, that would be your best option as you already have an existing Bachelors degree. Doing an accelerated BSN program will get you ready to start working in 1 year vs. doing an ADN program which will take 2 years. And then you're going to have to get the BSN eventually, which will take an additional 2 years on top of the 2 it took to get the ADN. Also, keep in mind that many hospitals are only hiring BSN's (at least here in NY).

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OBigdog26 has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP.

248 Posts; 7,256 Profile Views

Side note: be prepared to have no life for the next year with with the accelerated program.

Sent from my iPhone using allnurses

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BSNbeDONE has 34 years experience as a ASN, BSN, LPN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health.

2,464 Posts; 25,117 Profile Views

Years ago, my dad threw me into an LPN program; the economy threw me into the ASN; and I politely strolled into a BSN program and took a seat before current trends had the opportunity to throw me into that one, too.

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11 Posts; 1,411 Profile Views

I chose to get my ASN strictly because I could make the same amount of money with less schooling (this was 8yrs ago). Now, I'm glad I did that. I felt my ASN helped me with just the task of being a nurse where as my BSN helped me with defining what it means to be a nurse. My BSN really opened my eyes and showed me what this profession is all about and how important nurses are in the healthcare industry.

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Mini2544 has 1 years experience as a ASN, RN.

137 Posts; 3,555 Profile Views

Hello everyone!

I really enjoyed reading this post, as this is something i struggle with going forward. Nursing is a second profession for me and second time around at school. I am 32 and gave a very lucrative communication career to go this route. You just hear so many people say "oh hospitals only hire BSNs" you just don't know who to believe. Hospitals don't tell you that, but I think they want someone who wants to pursue that, as opposed with only earning an ASN and being complacent. The ASN program I am doing is only 4 semesters and then I am enrolling immediately in a BSN program. I just want to start working and I personally think that my previous education and career experience gives me so many tools as far as how to communicate effectively and leadership. When i looked at the curriculum for the ASN 4 semester degree program, I could not believe some schools cram a BSN in that time frame! Stresses me out just thinking about it!

Sarah

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