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Ask a CRNA any question you want

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by PaSSiNGaS PaSSiNGaS (Member)

PaSSiNGaS has 10 years experience and works as a CRNA.

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BecomingNursey works as a Emergency Department Registered Nurse.

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I recently have been accepted into a CRNA program. What do you recommend I do in the mean time before the program starts? Thanks for answering all these questions. Great thread!

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Im a CNA that just got into an ADN program. I was wondering about annual pay, stress level, work/personal life. I haven't decided if I want to be an optometrist or a CRNA, and your input will be much appreciated.

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sneaky_des has 1 years experience and works as a CNA, RN Student.

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Following, I'm still pre-nursing but very interested in becoming a CRNA

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whichone'spink has 3 years experience and works as a RN.

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I've got one, or at least one big one that could be many questions:

What are your thoughts on the Anesthesia Care Team model? Are you allowed to act as an independent provider, where you can write your own orders if RNs need an order for, say, more pain medications, or can consult for a patient in PACU who's in some trouble (airway issues etc)?

I've had instances where the anesthesiologist is not responding to pages and/or has left the building after a case on a weekend. The CRNA stays in house 24/7. I am sometimes (thankfully not often) frustrated when the anesthesiologist is MIA and I'm dealing with a CRNA that is reluctant to give me necessary orders or respond to a touchy patient situation. The latter has not happened to me yet. But it seems like with some CRNAs, they don't act like independent providers. They act like regular staff RNs, always having to defer to the anesthesiologist.

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PaSSiNGaS has 10 years experience and works as a CRNA.

2 Followers; 4,317 Visitors; 201 Posts

1) What type of nursing student were you (especially regarding GPA and clinical performance)? Did you know you wanted to be a CRNA while in nursing school?

2) What types of personalities/traits are best suited for being a CRNA?

3) Did you start out in the ICU, and how much experience did you have prior to CRNA school?

4) Where did you go to CRNA school?

5) Do you feel it was financially worth it for you to become a CRNA? Did you get tuition reimbursement?

Thanks!

I went into nursing to become a CRNA, only reason I did it. In my BSN I made mostly As with a few Bs here and there. I did not find nursing school difficult and felt a lot of the stuff useless IMO.

I wouldn't say a certain personality is best suited for being a CRNA but I think the ones who actually want to learn the basic sciences behind why we do things makes you better. Also someone who wants to have autonomy and not just push something or do something because some doc tells you to.

I started out in the ICU straight from school. I worked a total of 4 years, 2 of each in a Neuro Trauma ICU and a CVICU. Took care of all kinds of cases from ICH, traumas, EVDs, LVADs, heart/lung transplants, aortic dissections, balloon pumps, etc. Also managed vents and extubated fresh hearts.

Went to school in Florida

I definitely feel it was financially beneficial considering my salary now is 3 times what I made as a RN making 60k a year.

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PaSSiNGaS has 10 years experience and works as a CRNA.

2 Followers; 4,317 Visitors; 201 Posts

How do you recommend practicing spinals. I've heard of poking a watermelon to simulate it. During your schooling did you use landmarks for central lines or all ultrasound? Did you learn emergent airway techniques in school i.e retrograde intubation, has an airway disaster reared its ugly head in your practice?

Spinals just come with practice. Never heard of practicing with a watermelon and a dummy is pointless too. I did central lines with U/S and without. In my practice currently I do not use U/S unless I have tried multiple times and can't get it, but 99% of the time I can get it first try. Today I did a MAC cordis with swan in about 6min and if I was using U/S it would have probably added another 3 min. 3 min doesn't sound like much but when you have a CT surgeon chomping at the bit every minute counts.

You learn all kinds of different airway techniques. I've never personally done a retrograde intubation but a few of my classmates did. I have never had to cric a patient if thats what you're asking. Had a couple close scares with a can't intubate can't ventilate patient but trying different options and not trying something over and over usually gets you through it. Also don't be afraid to ask for help.

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PaSSiNGaS has 10 years experience and works as a CRNA.

2 Followers; 4,317 Visitors; 201 Posts

Why is it that the CRNA profession is shielded from over saturation and NP's are not?

Not sure the reason in regards to NPs, but the job market is definitely getting tighter each year with CRNAs because of how many grads come out of school everywhere. You still will have no problem getting a job but the days of big sign on bonuses and being able to negotiate salary is over.

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PaSSiNGaS has 10 years experience and works as a CRNA.

2 Followers; 4,317 Visitors; 201 Posts

I recently have been accepted into a CRNA program. What do you recommend I do in the mean time before the program starts? Thanks for answering all these questions. Great thread!

Nothing! Try to save money, spend time with your family, and relax. If you feel like you must read something then I recommend a good physiology book like Constanzo Physiology.

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PaSSiNGaS has 10 years experience and works as a CRNA.

2 Followers; 4,317 Visitors; 201 Posts

Im a CNA that just got into an ADN program. I was wondering about annual pay, stress level, work/personal life. I haven't decided if I want to be an optometrist or a CRNA, and your input will be much appreciated.

Not sure how to even answer your question because it seems like you really have no idea what to do considering CRNA and optometrist are two very different things. I suggest getting through your ADN program and not worry about CRNA anytime soon. You would still need a BSN before even thinking of CRNA anyway.

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PaSSiNGaS has 10 years experience and works as a CRNA.

2 Followers; 4,317 Visitors; 201 Posts

I've got one, or at least one big one that could be many questions:

What are your thoughts on the Anesthesia Care Team model? Are you allowed to act as an independent provider, where you can write your own orders if RNs need an order for, say, more pain medications, or can consult for a patient in PACU who's in some trouble (airway issues etc)?

I've had instances where the anesthesiologist is not responding to pages and/or has left the building after a case on a weekend. The CRNA stays in house 24/7. I am sometimes (thankfully not often) frustrated when the anesthesiologist is MIA and I'm dealing with a CRNA that is reluctant to give me necessary orders or respond to a touchy patient situation. The latter has not happened to me yet. But it seems like with some CRNAs, they don't act like independent providers. They act like regular staff RNs, always having to defer to the anesthesiologist.

And that's the problem with the CRNA profession. We are or at least should be trained to act as an independent practitioner, but then you get these stool monkeys that are totally fine just doing whatever a doc tells them and nothing more.

ACT practice is what it is and it is hard to become a solo independent practitioner unless you are willing to go to a rural area. There are very few independent CRNA only jobs in big cities. I work in an ACT practice now and will say you can easily tell the CRNAs who are capable of being independent and those that are fine just taking orders. Would I love to work in a fully independent practice, YOU BET, but I'm not willing to move to BFE and live in the woods.

My current practice I do everything from swans, alines, traumas, hearts, neuro, etc. except peripheral nerve blocks. Again I'd love to do those too but just not willing to move.

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