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As an LPN, I can't help but feel like I'm not a "real nurse"

LPN/LVN   (2,249 Views | 35 Replies)

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You can also try a different job somewhere that gives LPNs more freedom.  There's some stuff that only an RN can do and you're not allowed to, but most differences between LPNs and RNs is company policy and not law.

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I bet to your patients you are a real nurse!  Isn't that what matters most? 

Unfortunately, LPNs have been pushed out of many roles they formerly took on.  Even ADNs are in some markets being passed over in favor of BSNs.  As someone with a BSN, I can honestly say my degree is not what makes me a "real" nurse.  My degree was what got my foot in the door so I could learn to be a "real" nurse after the hospital hired me.  

If you're not happy with your current job or future employment limitations, go back and bridge to RN.  But it should be with the understanding that you're simply conforming to the market of what hiring managers expect.  It's not because you are not already a "real" nurse.

If you are happy with your current role, own it. Rock it.  Anyone who tries to make you feel small is misinformed or small-minded.  You are important to your patients, who are usually some of the most vulnerable members of our society.  Your patients deserve good nurses.  They deserve you.

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Nurselexii specializes in Non judgmental advisor.

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12 minutes ago, turtlesRcool said:

I bet to your patients you are a real nurse!  Isn't that what matters most? 

Unfortunately, LPNs have been pushed out of many roles they formerly took on.  Even ADNs are in some markets being passed over in favor of BSNs.  As someone with a BSN, I can honestly say my degree is not what makes me a "real" nurse.  My degree was what got my foot in the door so I could learn to be a "real" nurse after the hospital hired me.  

If you're not happy with your current job or future employment limitations, go back and bridge to RN.  But it should be with the understanding that you're simply conforming to the market of what hiring managers expect.  It's not because you are not already a "real" nurse.

If you are happy with your current role, own it. Rock it.  Anyone who tries to make you feel small is misinformed or small-minded.  You are important to your patients, who are usually some of the most vulnerable members of our society.  Your patients deserve good nurses.  They deserve you.

Beautiful 

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

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On 5/5/2020 at 7:54 PM, SlowlyButSurely said:

Hi All,

I've been an LPN for about 3 years and I work in LTC.  Whenever the topic of my job comes up I can't help but notice that people are disappointed in my response.  First I'm an LPN and not an RN and then I work in LTC and not a hospital ... Anyone else?  How do you deal with it?

Thanks!

Someone once said to me, "Are you an LVN or just an RN?" I answered that I was just an RN and they said, "Maybe you'll go back to school someday."

I told them that maybe I would.

I also had a patient ask me, "Why are you so fat?", but I was super-thin. I forgot what my response to that was, but my point is that I knew it wasn't true and it didn't bother me.

If you feel "disappointment" from others when you talk about your role, it's possible that you'd like to be in a different role. Just something to consider.

 

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235 Posts; 3,138 Profile Views

Okay, not to sound all mushy-gushy, but I’m an RN who has worked with really great LPNs and I for one don’t look down on anybody for being an LPN.

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All2Easy has 1 years experience.

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On 5/6/2020 at 8:01 AM, Mintezia said:

Mostly the only people who care about titles tend to be insecure RNs who weren't taught any better.

I second this!  Not happily, though.

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On 5/6/2020 at 7:45 PM, Mintezia said:

Making hospitals mandating BSNs and its magnet status probably is what brought on the idea that RN BSNs are the only valuable nurses when it isn't true. A home care nurse is equally responsible for keeping their client alive as well especially where vent and trachs are involved.

LVNs are indeed valuable members of the nursing team.  The push for BSN prepared nurses supports the movement to have smarter, well-rounded, competent, nurses.  It also supports the effort to make nursing a true profession — the same requirements across the board leading to entry level professional practice.  We have significant responsibility and it requires education to be properly equipped.  I earned my ADN, and now I’m working on my BSN and we are going “deeper“, and not in a fluffy, busy-work way.  I am being prepared to fully treat the whole patient, lead a team, and so much more.  

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I too am an LPN, (AKA LVN in most places in California) and I also started in LTC. I was mirroring your feelings almost exactly. 
Though I would love to go back to school for my RN and BSN, that’s currently not in the cards for me at the moment. 
What did help me was this; I worked my but off in every position I had, and moved up the ladder in LTC. When I felt I had no room for growth in one company, I moved to another where I was able to grow eventually up to management. This was a great opportunity, however I realized then that I preferred more hands on, and used it as a tool to help me beef up my resume. 
I continued to take other classes here and there, I became IV certified, and also a certified BLS First Aid and CPR Instructor. Then I started applying like crazy to other jobs in different areas of nursing. Ultimately I landed for a highly reputable corporation, as an urgent care nurse and I LOVE it. 
In conclusion- don’t ever question all the hard work, energy, and hours you have put into that license of yours. Though the title may be different, it very clearly says nurse, on your license, and for that you should be so very proud! 
Look for opportunities for growth in your current job, if they’re not there, look elsewhere. A different field may completely change your perspective as it did mine. 
GOOD LUCK! And keep kickin’ a** being the NURSE that you are. 🙂
 

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On 5/10/2020 at 5:10 PM, turtlesRcool said:

 

If you're not happy with your current job or future employment limitations, go back and bridge to RN.  But it should be with the understanding that you're simply conforming to the market of what hiring managers expect.  It's not because you are not already a "real" nurse.

I disagree.  The jump from LVN to ADN to BSN is significantly more complex than just confirming to the market..  ADN school is hard.  Perhaps the best person to tell it is a LVN who went back for their ADN/BSN.  Manny LVNs have failed their RN program, not because they weren’t smart enough, but because it’s a different level of thinking and nursing and it should be approached with a level of humility and readiness to learn as opposed to thinking you know it already.
 

The medical field is so elitist and undermining:  LVNs can “work circles around RNs”,  “LVNs aren’t as valuable as RNs”,  RNs gloat over physician mistakes, “CRNAs have all the capabilities of anesthesiologists”.  Honestly, we don’t know what we don’t know if we haven’t accomplished the other persons level of education and experience.  Everyone deserves respect.

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Section8UpX68WM6 has 27 years experience as a CNA, LVN, EMT-B.

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On 5/6/2020 at 10:54 AM, SlowlyButSurely said:

Hi All,

I've been an LPN for about 3 years and I work in LTC.  Whenever the topic of my job comes up I can't help but notice that people are disappointed in my response.  First I'm an LPN and not an RN and then I work in LTC and not a hospital ... Anyone else?  How do you deal with it?

Thanks!

Here's my take. I've worked healthcare for 27 years. I couldn't care less what people think. I've got skills and experience in the military, LTC, major city hospitals, visiting patients in their homes, and office nursing some RNs (especially new grads) wished they had. On the flip side of that, I do get envious of RNs and NPs sometimes because I wanted to be an RN a looong time ago. I know RNs and NPs that do make you look inadequate though 😂 and I have worked with really good ones over the years. I miss seeing their faces.

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18 Posts; 443 Profile Views

As I like to say.. not a real nurse? well the drugs are real and so are the people.  LPNs are awesome. I am going back to school for my RN and I think furthering our education is a great thing if it works for you, but I also hope you can take pride in being what you are. There is definitely a perception out there that we don't do as much as we do. I get disappointed when I hear people say things criticizing LPNs critical thinking or assessment skills, but I think the best solution is to let your intelligence and patient care speak for itself. 

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calmone6165 has 1 years experience.

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On 5/17/2020 at 8:58 AM, nursinginpink said:

In conclusion- don’t ever question all the hard work, energy, and hours you have put into that license of yours. Though the title may be different, it very clearly says nurse, on your license, and for that you should be so very proud! 
Look for opportunities for growth in your current job, if they’re not there, look elsewhere. A different field may completely change your perspective as it did mine. 
GOOD LUCK! And keep kickin’ a** being the NURSE that you are. 🙂
 

Excellent advice. ALL of it! Be proud of your accomplishments and don't let anyone take that away from you!

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