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Anyone okay with just being a nurse?

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by Kaychell Kaychell (New Member) New Member

Kaychell specializes in None.

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I've never really thought about it-teaching that is, and I'm exploring all options...I too have a Master's (in Public Health). Once I graduate from my ADN program, could I then teach nursing students, or do I need an actual Master's in Nursing??

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~Mi Vida Loca~RN has 6 years experience and specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics.

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I agree. I just alpplied for a job opening for LPN in a hospital setting. So LPNs are still very much in demand. Who is THEY anyway. All I hear is They say this . THey say that. WHO in the heck is THEY. If I knew who THEY was I would tell them they are obviously wrong because as a WoRking LPN I haven't had once an employer tell me: LPNS are phased out and you won't ever get a job anywhere.

Well that's the thing, some areas they are being phased out. Others, not so much. It's also not that they can't get a job here either, it's that they can't get a job in what is considered acute care experience here. As new grads you have to have that 1 year acute care full time exp to no longer be considered a new grad. That is where the problem lies in my area.

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16,362 Visitors; 2,139 Posts

Everyone has different aspirations with none being any more significant than others. Clinically, Im certain that the emergency department is the only arena for me, but truth be told, I'd rather go into administration than anything.

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Moogie specializes in Gerontology, nursing education.

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I've never really thought about it-teaching that is, and I'm exploring all options...I too have a Master's (in Public Health). Once I graduate from my ADN program, could I then teach nursing students, or do I need an actual Master's in Nursing??

In most places you will need a master's in nursing. Since you already have an MPH, you might be able to bypass the BSN and get into grad school but definitely get a bit of experience under your belt before you apply.

None, zippo, nada, zilch to further my education in clinical practice. However, I am seriously considering the idea of finishing off my certain-to-be-stellar practicing career as a teacher of nursing.

I'm just not sure if I should graduate from my BSN program, get a job, then do night classes as a nurse educator to get the sheepskin in the bag. Or, if I should graduate, get a job, work for a few years, then get the academic credentials. Either way, no self-respecting program would hire me until I have a five or more years of bedside practice, but I'm just not sure if I should get the academic part of it out of the way sooner.

In all honesty, if you can work a year or two before going back to school, it would be to your advantage. Getting a bit of bedside experience will be of tremendous help when you take a graduate course in nursing research because you will need to be able to apply evidence-based research into nursing practice. In the meantime, though, you could certainly start with a few night classes. Most graduate programs allow students to take a certain number of credits before being officially accepted into a track so they can get their feet wet. Many programs require a graduate-level statistics course---that would be a good choice for someone starting to explore graduate school. Many programs also require graduate-level pathophysiology (another good choice) and every one that I have seen requires a course in health care policy and finance. Nursing theory is also a good place to start.

Please feel free to PM me if you want to talk about grad school. I would be happy to help!

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OB-nurse2013 has 3 years experience and specializes in Labor and Delivery.

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Wow this was a good thread for many reasons. One, I have always thought I wanted to get my master's which is why I am a BSN student but lately I don't know about that. I'm young but not that young and I don't think there's anything wrong with being a nurse or "just a nurse" :) But I don't know, many people at my school that I've spoken with have said that if you're getting your bachelor's in nursing then it's silly not to get your master's, and if that wan't the plan then it's stupid to get your bachelor's instead of doing an associate's. Personally, it's a goal for me to get my bachelor's no matter what the major.

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