Jump to content

Any RN working in L&D with only an ADN??

just wanted to know if getting employed with an ADN was possible, because every job post i read always states BSN prefered... im finishing up my ADN with no plans on going for my BSN....if anyone has any info please share...:confused:

just wanted to know if getting employed with an ADN was possible, because every job post i read always states BSN prefered... im finishing up my ADN with no plans on going for my BSN....if anyone has any info please share...:confused:

The key word here is "preferred." As long as they don't say "required" you have a shot. However, they might hire a BSN over an ADN if both apply for the same job. You should apply regardless, if that's the job you want. It can't hurt and you could end up getting hired.

Find a better hospital. BSN doesn't make you any better of a bedside nurse. I know of a few highly respectful hospitals with magnet status that PREFER an ADN prepared nurse over a BSN prepared nurse because they pick things up faster. I worked for a magnet hospital that preferred ADN personally. They only hire the bare minimum BSN required and fill the rest with ADN.

bewitched specializes in ICU, Intermediate Care, Progressive Care.

I am actually surprised that more hospitals don't prefer ADN just for the sheer fact that they'd be saving roughly $1-$2 an hour per ADN, if they're a facility with a pay difference between ADN + BSN.

Find a better hospital. BSN doesn't make you any better of a bedside nurse. I know of a few highly respectful hospitals with magnet status that PREFER an ADN prepared nurse over a BSN prepared nurse because they pick things up faster. I worked for a magnet hospital that preferred ADN personally. They only hire the bare minimum BSN required and fill the rest with ADN.

First off, you are gonna get yourself into hot water by making generalized statements like ADNs picking up things faster because THAT's not true. Having an ADN or BSN has NOTHING to do with how quickly someone picks things up. It has to do with the PERSON, NOT the degree.

Second, PLEASE lets not make this a debate on whether an ADN or BSN is better. That was not the question and there are plenty of other threads to debate this, if you must.

The fact of the matter is that some employers PREFER the BSN, some REQUIRE the BSN, and others don't care at all. Regardless of your personal feelings on the matter, a job applicant needs to convince a potential employer that he/she is qualified for the job, irrespecitve of his/her degree, if they are to have a shot at being hired. PERIOD!

Oh, and one more thing, just because a hospital preferrs an ADN does NOT make it a "better" hospital!

I am actually surprised that more hospitals don't prefer ADN just for the sheer fact that they'd be saving roughly $1-$2 an hour per ADN, if they're a facility with a pay difference between ADN + BSN.

The vast majority of hospitals don't differentiate monetarily between the ADN and BSN, and those that do generally don't come close to paying that much more.

The fact of the matter is that some employers PREFER the BSN, some REQUIRE the BSN, and others don't care at all. Regardless of your personal feelings on the matter, a job applicant needs to convince a potential employer that he/she is qualified for the job, irrespecitve of his/her degree, if they are to have a shot at being hired. PERIOD!

The statement that ADN grads pick things up faster than BSN grads isn't a personal opinion. It is a direct opinion from multiple hospital directors and administrators at three different hospitals in three different states. After reviewing the curriculum, I can't fathom how the degree would make the slightest bit of difference in bedside nursing so I'm at a complete loss as to why it matters what degree you have. I'm actually one class shy of completing a local RN-BSN program and I haven't even started my ADN program yet and I guarantee you none of the classes I took that count towards the RN-BSN program are remotely relevant to bedside nursing.

dthfytr specializes in ER, Trauma.

just wanted to know if getting employed with an ADN was possible, because every job post i read always states BSN prefered... im finishing up my ADN with no plans on going for my BSN....if anyone has any info please share...:confused:

"Only" is such a frequently used word by nurses describing nurses. I can't give you a diagnosis, I'm "only a nurse." I know the op didn't mean it the way I first took it, demeaning an ADN. The semantics is a frequent issue, has anybody heard of a good alternative? Only asking.

roser13 specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

The statement that ADN grads pick things up faster than BSN grads isn't a personal opinion. It is a direct opinion from multiple hospital directors and administrators at three different hospitals in three different states. After reviewing the curriculum, I can't fathom how the degree would make the slightest bit of difference in bedside nursing so I'm at a complete loss as to why it matters what degree you have. I'm actually one class shy of completing a local RN-BSN program and I haven't even started my ADN program yet and I guarantee you none of the classes I took that count towards the RN-BSN program are remotely relevant to bedside nursing.

Please....don't turn the thread into this old argument. It is totally off track of the OP's question.

If you really need to go there, start your own thread. You will likely get lots of responses, even though it's been hashed, rehashed and then mashed to death.

Edited by roser13

wow thats exactly what i want!!! what area are u in?? what experience did u pose for the job?? how much did they start u off at??

schack specializes in med/surg, tele, OB.

I am an ADN in OB. I did have a year of med/surg/tele prior to being hired. I would say where I work there are more BSN nurses but everyone has been so supportive of me and I have picked things up pretty quickly. I think it's more about being the right fit for the particular unit... jmho

The statement that ADN grads pick things up faster than BSN grads isn't a personal opinion. It is a direct opinion from multiple hospital directors and administrators at three different hospitals in three different states. After reviewing the curriculum, I can't fathom how the degree would make the slightest bit of difference in bedside nursing so I'm at a complete loss as to why it matters what degree you have. I'm actually one class shy of completing a local RN-BSN program and I haven't even started my ADN program yet and I guarantee you none of the classes I took that count towards the RN-BSN program are remotely relevant to bedside nursing.

I think I'd need substantive proof that "multiple hospital directors and administrators" prefer an ADN because "ADN grads pick things up faster than BSN grads." That's as absurd a statement as I've ever heard. They may prefer ADN grads for other reasons, but I just don't believe that directors and administrators would say such a thing.

Regardless of what is being done at the hospitals you mentioned, the fact remains that some employers want their nurses to have a BSN, so it doesn't matter what anyone's opinion is about ADN vs BSN, if they don't want to hire an ADN they won't. But, there are plenty of employers out there who do hire ADNs, and that's the only point I was trying to make for the OP.

Besides that, I believe that it can't hurt to apply for any job where the stated requirements are greater than what the applicant actually has, since employers sometimes can't get what they want and will often take what they can get, as long as an applicant can convince them that he/she is qualified.

klone specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

I am an ADN who has only worked OB/L&D my entire nursing career. I think I may possibly be the only ADN RN at my current job (and this is a magnet facility). Experience does count for a lot.

There are quite a few hospitals here, only 2 of them (same hospital w/ 2 campuses) require a BSN to do L&D. I did have one director tell me she thinks it helps when nurses do at least 6 mos in med surg before applying to L&D but others have told me it's unnecessary. If you're having problems, why not try and get a job in a Dr's office first and then apply after you have some experience? I'm doing that while I go from LPN to ASN hopefully and then I'm relying on that and my outside birth stuff to help me get a job in the hospital when I graduate w/ my ASN. Then I have plans to go CNM, but that's a good 4 yrs from now.

@NIcole 2010 where do you work/live, I am a new grad and cannot find an L&D job any pointers?Thanks

I am an ADN that was hired in L&D last year as a new grad. Most hospitals in the Dallas area do not specify ADN or BSN, just based on my job search. I work in a large hospital that does not offer a pay difference for either degree, in fact I graduate with my BSN in December and will not receive any compensation for the degree.

And just to add my $.02, my coursework for my BSN was strictly administrative. There was not extention of my clinical practice so I'm personally not buying the ADN is better/worse than the BSN.

HeartsOpenWide specializes in Ante-Intra-Postpartum, Post Gyne.

I am a BSN working in L&D and we have BSN and ADN nurses. If you did not ask what type of degree the nurse had you would never know...

klone specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

I am a BSN working in L&D and we have BSN and ADN nurses. If you did not ask what type of degree the nurse had you would never know...

I agree with this. I don't believe there is any difference in quality of clinical training between the average ADN program and the average BSN program. It's possible that some individual programs are better, and turn out more prepared nurses than other individual programs.

×

By using the site you agree to our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies.

OK