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Am I doing the right thing?

Nurses   (1,462 Views 13 Comments)
by 7colorsrainbow 7colorsrainbow (Member) Member

854 Profile Views; 15 Posts

Upon discharge a 23-year-old young man who came in for seizure, he requested for appointment at psychological medicine clinic because unable to sleep for few days and low mood. When I informed him about the date of appointment under psychological medicine, his mother at bedside seemed not understand, looked surprised and asked why her son need to see psychological medicine doctor but the patient expressed his anger and said never mind!As I realized the patient may not want to let his mother to know about it, so I didn't explain further to his mother for patient's confidentiality.When reflected back about the incident, I was thinking if I do the right thing to disclose the thing to his mother? Should I actually explained to patient's mother so that patient can get psychological support from his mother? What if the source of stress is actually from patient's family? Well, I guess I did the right thing for the issue. if you are in my position, what will you do?

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OCRN3 has 16 years experience and specializes in Med/surg, Tele, educator, FNP.

388 Posts; 8,512 Profile Views

Yeah I can see what the issue was with the patient. Now the mom will be questioning him about the issue. You can't really tell mom anything since he isn't a minor. I think I would have apologized and said my mistake and somehow talk to the patient privately.

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ScientistSalarian specializes in Critical Care.

207 Posts; 4,848 Profile Views

The patient is an adult and entitled to privacy. Unless he explicitly consented to having information shared with his mother or any other non-healthcare provider it was totally inappropriate for you to share this. I just hope it didn't keep this poor kid from seeking the help he needs.

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loriangel14 is a RN and specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

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I wouldn't have brought the appointment up in front of another person.

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roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

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No, you did not do the right thing. You violated a young adult's privacy without his permission.

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15 Posts; 854 Profile Views

I wouldn't have brought the appointment up in front of another person.

Most patients in my place will ask to explain about the appointment to their caregiver. So we need to wait their caregiver to be with them before discharge them.

In this situation, the patient himself did not tell nurses or doctors not to tell his family member.

Edited by 7colorsrainbow
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Pixie.RN has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

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In this situation, the patient himself did not tell nurses or doctors not to tell his family member.

It's not up to the patient to tell you who to tell or not; it is up to you to ASK first before discussing anything in front of others.

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15 Posts; 854 Profile Views

The patient is an adult and entitled to privacy. Unless he explicitly consented to having information shared with his mother or any other non-healthcare provider it was totally inappropriate for you to share this. I just hope it didn't keep this poor kid from seeking the help he needs.

Dear ScientistSalarian,

Thanks for your comment. What you said is right about patient's privacy. I will learn from this issue and be more alert about patient's confidentiality. This is also first time I encountered the situation like this. I am new grad. Well, that is my purpose of putting this situation for reflection and to seek for opinions regardless negatively or positively.

What if the patient is below 21 years old, will you tell his mother if his mother wanted update about patient's condition?

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15 Posts; 854 Profile Views

It's not up to the patient to tell you who to tell or not; it is up to you to ASK first before discussing anything in front of others.

Dear Pixie, yes. You are right about this. I should ask first to protect patient's confidentiality.

Thanks for your advice!

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Pixie.RN has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

7 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,313 Posts; 129,246 Profile Views

What if the patient is below 21 years old, will you tell his mother if his mother wanted update about patient's condition?

21? People are "adults" at 18, and some states even give minors special rights when it comes to matters of reproduction and/or mental health. You should look into your state laws, and I suggest discussing this issue with a unit educator or mentor to help you understand local laws and practices so that things like this don't happen again. Live and learn, right? :)

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15 Posts; 854 Profile Views

Actually I not remember the exact age of the patient. This situation is an example of scenario for reflective practice. Sorry

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15 Posts; 854 Profile Views

21? People are "adults" at 18, and some states even give minors special rights when it comes to matters of reproduction and/or mental health. You should look into your state laws, and I suggest discussing this issue with a unit educator or mentor to help you understand local laws and practices so that things like this don't happen again. Live and learn, right? :)

That's precious advice from you! I appreciated it so much! Thank you :)

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