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AF Reserve Flight Nursing

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I'm in the application process for USAFR flight nursing. I am prior service active duty AF and my spouse just retired from AD as a flyer, so I'm not new to the military, however, am for reserve nursing. Anyone have any insight on this field? I have spoken to some and know things change. As of current, I was told that they now require ALL flyers, reserve/guard/active, to complete the full SERE now instead of non-capture/water survival. COT 5.5 wks, 30 days Flight School at Wright-Patt, 19 days I believe of SERE, and I forget what else. Anyone been to non-combat survival school? My hub went YEARS ago. Experiences?

Wolf at the Door

Has 7 years experience.

what is your nursing background.

5 years in acute care, transferring to ED next week. Why?

Wolf at the Door

Has 7 years experience.

5 years in acute care, transferring to ED next week. Why?

Flight nursing requires ICU exp and trauma. It is important. Maybe different from the military.

It is different for military because you are on a huge plane, not a helo or private. You take care of patients that are not critical, there's a separate critical care team (CCAT) who comes on board during the transfer. A military flight nurse ensures the plane is set up to care for all patients. You take care of the non-critical and assist the CCAT team. Th CCAT team are not flyers like FN's because they are solely caring for the patient before during and after transport. I am prior service and have fellow FN friends. Only one year of acute care required and they will send you to training that equals 6 mos sporadically or consecutively, depending on timing. Anyone who works in a plane is considered a flyer, all flyers have to go through survival school where you are trained to be in a capture situation if you were to survive a plane crash. Water survival is included. My spouse went through it. Pretty cool. So yes, the military FN is much different than civilian.

I am doing the same thing right now, I have almost 3 years of acute care experience and my recruiter said I can apply. I just completed my paperwork and just waiting on my Army commander to send my 368

Wolf at the Door

Has 7 years experience.

It is different for military because you are on a huge plane, not a helo or private. You take care of patients that are not critical, there's a separate critical care team (CCAT) who comes on board during the transfer. A military flight nurse ensures the plane is set up to care for all patients. You take care of the non-critical and assist the CCAT team. Th CCAT team are not flyers like FN's because they are solely caring for the patient before during and after transport. I am prior service and have fellow FN friends. Only one year of acute care required and they will send you to training that equals 6 mos sporadically or consecutively, depending on timing. Anyone who works in a plane is considered a flyer, all flyers have to go through survival school where you are trained to be in a capture situation if you were to survive a plane crash. Water survival is included. My spouse went through it. Pretty cool. So yes, the military FN is much different than civilian.

Oh thanks for the breakdown. That would not be my cup of tea. I only want to transport ground or flight. Then I want to get the next person not continue the care.

You would only be caring for non critical patients while they are on the plane. CCAT is separate and they care for critical patients before, during, and after.

Devo19, BSN

Specializes in Surgical Intensive Care. Has 7 years experience.

5 Weeks of COT = Maxwell AFB, AL

3 weeks of SERE = Spokane, WA

2 days of water survival = Spokane, WA

1 month of flight school = WP AFB, OH

FYI/AEIQ (Ground Training= either Weight Patterson or at your base..Not sure how long

FYI: Security Clearance's might take a little bit (6 months to a year)

Yep. Could you describe SERE for me in a nutshell? Do you stay overnight outside and/or inside when "captured"? How many days classroom vs exercise?

nurse2033, MSN, RN

Specializes in ER, ICU.

You have an excellent picture of the training. You sound nervous about SERE. Virtually no one fails. Just do what they tell you and you will be fine. It is... uncomfortable, but the best training I've ever had, in any field. There is a variety of indoor and outdoor training (including overnights), and a fair amount of classroom. They give you all the gear you need, and keep you safe. If you know what SERE stands for, it follows the continuum of each letter. You left out FTU which is your flying internship that follows flight school. It is a few weeks and returns you to your unit as Basic Air Qualified.

My main concern is that there's a daily med I take, which I have a waiver for, and was concerned about having access to it or how many days I would have to go without it if not in a dorm or other room. I'm not scared, pretty excited. My spouse went years ago but unable to tell me that part as he didn't take any mess back then and he thinks some things changed. I didn't ask the recruiter and sometimes they don't know all the details. That's the only reason I am concerned. Also, can we bring Motrin/Tylenol with us and keep in our bags most of the time? I know it's silly, but that is it. If not, no worries, just curious.

Devo19, BSN

Specializes in Surgical Intensive Care. Has 7 years experience.

Daily medication approved by the flight surgeon is allowed. They just carry out and destribute it out on the field.

OUxPhys, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology. Has 4 years experience.

So for the reserves is this training all at once or broken up? How does it work?

Devo19, BSN

Specializes in Surgical Intensive Care. Has 7 years experience.

They try to do all of the training back to back but it's not always like that. They might put you on orders between the training so you don't have to go back to your job.

Devo19, BSN

Specializes in Surgical Intensive Care. Has 7 years experience.

They don't start it until you commission but you can go to all the schools except SERE....So basically you can't fly overseas until you go to SERE

Edited by Vona86
Error

Devo19, BSN

Specializes in Surgical Intensive Care. Has 7 years experience.

Swearing in (commissioning) happens after everything is completed and approved by the surgeon general. Can be as long as a year to two years...

Vona , can you tell anything about pay ?

Vs my ER job , how much you'll make a weekend? Or per week ?

Is training paid ? All the schools away from home ?