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adrenaline junkie==RN?

Posted

Has 2 years experience.

I am the type of person who hates code blue, staff assist situations, etc. it freaks me out and I am not the type to think logically in emergent situations. am I the only one like this? I worked with some people who loved when codes occur or new grads who "can't wait to see a patient decompensate." I want to work in the NICU but I'm scared of the codes...does this make sense or am I insane?

You don’t have to love codes. Not everyone does. But do realize working in any type of an ICU situation there will be codes. All units have them, but they are most common in the icus as those are the sickest patients.

Why are you wanting NICU? What not labor and delivery?

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

13 hours ago, nursingworldwhy said:

am I insane?

As a former PAS agent and nurse with over 25 years working in the psychiatric field, I believe I can relatively safely conclude that no, nursingworthy, you are not insane.

13 hours ago, nursingworldwhy said:

I worked with some people who loved when codes occur or new grads who "can't wait to see a patient decompensate."

No need to feel bad about not being like ^ that. 🙄

But I have a question: Are you student, a newer nurse, an experienced nurse who has never worked around many emergent situations? In other words, have your concerns been tested IRL?

It's a good idea to consider your personality when deciding what to do; on the other hand might not be good to convince yourself that you can't learn to handle something before you try. I've seen plenty of (usually a little bit newer) nurses spin around in circles and you'd think a deranged cat was running through the trauma bay given the amount of banging around, things being knocked over, drawers slamming...🙂...People learn quickly though.

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience.

Watching as a spectator like your new grads friends when a patient decompensates is very different than having the responsibility of putting those ACLS skills to work when it is your patient.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

I found that in a crisis situation, I was more timid right in the IMMED beginning, but within a minute or so, the 'fight or flight' hormones would self-regulate & temper out. I'd do fine then!

2 hours ago, RNperdiem said:

Watching as a spectator like your new grads friends when a patient decompensates is very different than having the responsibility of putting those ACLS skills to work when it is your patient.

And then when you realize that it's only YOU or maybe ONE other until the full brigade arrives, you just 'fall into the groove' and that nsg drive takes over.