ACC Nursing Drop Out Rate

Posted

Heard a sobering statistic this afternoon from a unnamed "high level source" :D that there is a 40% drop out rate for ACC nursing students after the first semester of nursing classes. Note that these are not the pre-requisite classes but actual nursing classes.

Probably many reasons: class load too heavy, not enough time to study, demands of children and family and work, not enough commitment by students, poor professors, too expensive, insufficient student neurons, overactive hormones, texting, who knows?

Perhaps that first semester of nursing classes is where ACC separates the wheat from the chaff.

Bo

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience. 9,051 Posts

I know that nursing schools have historically high attrition rates, but I hadn't realized that it was that high after just the first semester. I know that we have a lot of research telling us how "different" the millenneal generation is - and how traditional education models may not work with them. But the nursing student population is older than most other student groups, so I don't know how much it would be affected by generational issues. It's pretty scary.

Bo Shoi Ming

Bo Shoi Ming

112 Posts

The two oldest students in Psyc 101 got A's. That says something about their commitment.

If the fees, tuition, and books come out of your own pocket you are more committed too.

little_bird

little_bird

22 Posts

I just wanted to throw something out there for the nervous folks applying for the ACC Nursing program who might have stumbled upon this thread.

I am onsite, Level 2. Last semester, we lost 5 people total out of 50 (10%) and one was health related. Don't get discouraged. It is hard, but not that hard. :)

Bo Shoi Ming

Bo Shoi Ming

112 Posts

I just wanted to throw something out there for the nervous folks applying for the ACC Nursing program who might have stumbled upon this thread.

I am onsite, Level 2. Last semester, we lost 5 people total out of 50 (10%) and one was health related. Don't get discouraged. It is hard, but not that hard. :)

Thanks--Just started Anatomy Wed. Out of a class of 24 I'd say there are perhaps 5 or 6 30 or older.

Glad to hear Level II isn't that hard.

Bo, stubborn, determined, and committed (hopefully not to the Psyc Ward ):lol2:

gibson0726

gibson0726

Specializes in Neonatal ICU. Has 5 years experience. 160 Posts

That sounds awfully high to me. I just graduated from ACC in December and I was one of the "drop outs" after level one. I was in a really bad accident and couldn't walk, my orthopedic surgeon refused to grant me medical clearance (obviously), therefore I couldn't move on to level 2. I sat out a semester and jumped in with the next class.

My original class started with 70 people and I know about 12 or so did not move on to level 1. There were various reasons for this: health reasons, failures, and some people decided nursing just wasn't for them. My 2nd clinical day one of the girls in my group left the hospital in the morning and never came back! :eek: They wound up graduating with about 55 students.

My class started with 60 and 42 of us graduated. Don't let the whole nursing school thing freak you out. People will tell you that it's the hardest thing you will ever do, but it's not necessarily the difficult material, but how time consuming it is. When I started on-site we had to attend class for 2 days, lab for 1 day, and 2 days of clinical. Plus you had to go up to the hospital the day before clinical to gather patient information. You are learning how to think like a nurse and get comfortable learning new skills. Check-offs are stressful. You will be doing lots of studying and practicing. Make friends. They will be your support system over the next 4 semesters and it makes the hard times more bearable because they are going through the same thing.

Buy the Saunders NCLEX book if you haven't already. It will help you immensely with exams. Answering NCLEX style questions was incredibly difficult for me in the beginning, so if you learn how to do it early, you will be very successful. Personally, level 2 was my hardest semester just because of the volume of paperwork my clinical instructor required. That makes a huge difference. I was spending 12-15 hours on paperwork per week on top of everything else. Level 4 was my easiest semester by far, but I was so over it, that I kind of slacked off.

Enjoy the ride because it goes by fast. I think back fondly on my time at ACC. There are some really fantastic instructors there that really want you to succeed, even though they will be hard on you at times. Please let me know if you have any questions. Good Luck!!

sbyramRN

sbyramRN

304 Posts

I think it is that way at most nursing schools. We started out with 50 and graduated 12 of the original 50.

AdrianLU

AdrianLU

Specializes in Critical Care. 134 Posts

I also think most schools are this way. Some people just aren't ready at that time and need to take a fail to light a fire underneath them so they can come back and finish the program, some people change their mind about nursing, and some people can't learn to think like a nurse and that is mostly what the first semester is about. Other's have things in their personal lives. In my BSN program we probably loss 20-30 people that first semester out of about 150. By the end of the program we probably loss like 10-20 more before our class graduated.

wanttoteachRN

wanttoteachRN

5 Posts

The current 1st semester class at Eastview has lost 7 now, at midterms. i do not know about the other locations.

staterrocker

staterrocker

1 Post

As a male student, sometimes it is because of sensitive female nurses that want to dominate the market.

bnicole

bnicole

13 Posts

I am at my first semester at CEC and we have only lost 3 or 4 people as the semester is about to end

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