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Abandonment?

Nurses   (1,576 Views 7 Comments)
by isisqueenofswords isisqueenofswords (New Member) New Member

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Please help. I'm new here at this site. I need info on abandonment, what constitutes it. I just received notice that I'm terminated because I left my job Sunday morning, before clocking in. They've said they are turning in my license for abandonment. I though abandonment could only be brought against a nurse after she/he clocks in, and accepts an assignment by report and counting.

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Please help. I'm new here at this site. I need info on abandonment, what constitutes it. I just received notice that I'm terminated because I left my job Sunday morning, before clocking in. They've said they are turning in my license for abandonment. I though abandonment could only be brought against a nurse after she/he clocks in, and accepts an assignment by report and counting.

Hello, IsisQueen

I have read about this issue many times. It is my understanding that if you never clock in or take report from the offgoing nurse, then that does not constitute abandonment. Abandonment would be, for example, you clocking in, taking report from the offgoing nurse, then deciding that you don't want to stick around and then you leave. That would be abandonment. Your situation warrants a no-call/no-show or you simply walking off the job. You could get fired, but they definitely shouldn't be able to get your license revoked. I hope everythings turns out alright for you.

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Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

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Good luck. Best to contact your BON. In some states just showing up and leaving is abandonment, whether you've clocked in, whether you've "accepted" the assignment or not.

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NoWaNrN has 6 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in critical care and LTC.

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I think some places like to threaten they are going to take your license. I worked first shift and second shift never called or came in and the administrator was saying she was going to take the 2nd shift nurses license for that! Some people are just plain nuts and don't know what they are talking about. But seriously, we have many nurses who have stolen pt drugs and are getting 2nd chances, I think you will be fine if you never clocked in. I do agree with the above that it would be more of a no call no show. Good Luck.

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MadisonsMomRN is a BSN, RN and specializes in Addictions, Corrections, QA/Education.

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I practice in Maryland and this is their definition of abandonment. I looked around a little and its basically the same. You should be able to find out by going on your bon site.

"Abandonment: Occurs when a licensed nurse terminates the nurse-patient relationship without reasonable notification to the nursing supervisor for the continuation of the patient's care.

The nurse-patient relationship begins when responsibility for nursing care of a patient is accepted by the nurse. Nursing management is accountable for assessing the capabilities of personnel and delegating responsibility or assigning nursing care functions to personnel qualified to assume such responsibility or to perform such functions."

Here is the link to the entire article

http://www.mbon.org/main.php?v=norm&p=0&c=practice/abandonment.html

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Mommy TeleRN has 3 years experience as a RN and specializes in Float.

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Just read about this in the TN bon newsletter...here is a link to the newsletter...

http://www2.state.tn.us/health/Downloads/Nurs_Perspectives_Spring_2007.pdf

The article is on page 22. According to their definition you must first accept an assignment to be considered having abandoned. Interestingly refusing to work past your assignment was NOT considered abandonment. Of course it could vary by your state but this sounds like an employer/employee issue, not a licensing issue.

Just curious...why did you leave before clocking in?

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