Peace Corps | allnurses

Peace Corps

  1. 0 I have wanted to join the Peace Corps since I was a kid. I've looked into it but I would love to hear some stories of nurses, OR techs, etc who have worked with the Peace Corps. My biggest worry is the language barrier. Also, what did your family think and how did you stay close to your family even though you were thousands of miles away with no internet or phone?
  2. Visit  bethin profile page

    About bethin

    Joined Sep '05; Posts: 7,765; Likes: 1,213.

    13 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  natrgrrl profile page
    0
    I was really hoping there would be some answers posted to your question. I feel the same desire to go where my help is needed most, but people who are willing and able to share their experiences seem to be few and far between. My aunt was in the Peace Corps for many years when I was a kid. She was usually able to come home for at least a weekend in the summer and asked us to send her care packages. She worked in Africa and the Philippines teaching English. She developed an indescribable love for those people she worked with.
    That is the only Peace Corps story I have ever heard, but I want to know more. If you find any information, post it here because there are a lot of us who have the same interest you do.
  4. Visit  bethin profile page
    0
    Thank you for your response. While the Peace Corps isn't exactly a volunteer organization, you do get a small stipend each month I thought this was the best place to post this. I think I'll copy this to the general nsg forum so more people can see it. Maybe then we'll get more responses!!
  5. Visit  prmenrs profile page
    0
    I'm pretty sure you've been to the website already, but, here it is for anyone who needs it.

    http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm
  6. Visit  alem-tsahai profile page
    1
    Hey there,

    I was a PCV in Ethiopia (97-99). Great experience. I wasn't a nurse at the time but my experience there steered me toward the profession.

    The ease of staying in touch with your family all varies according to where you are posted. You definitely need to be flexible, that will make or break your experience. If you go to a country trying to replicate the same lifestyle you are used to in the States, you will be in for a rude awakening as that is almost impossible to do.

    You will learn so much if you go ahead with it. I would definitely do it again in a heartbeat. Two years seem like a long time but it really isn't. I mean it's been almost ten years since I first left for Ethiopia and lately I've been wondering where all the time went.

    Feel free to ask me any questions and good luck!
    natrgrrl likes this.
  7. Visit  bethin profile page
    0
    Quote from alem-tsahai
    Hey there,

    I was a PCV in Ethiopia (97-99). Great experience. I wasn't a nurse at the time but my experience there steered me toward the profession.

    The ease of staying in touch with your family all varies according to where you are posted. You definitely need to be flexible, that will make or break your experience. If you go to a country trying to replicate the same lifestyle you are used to in the States, you will be in for a rude awakening as that is almost impossible to do.

    You will learn so much if you go ahead with it. I would definitely do it again in a heartbeat. Two years seem like a long time but it really isn't. I mean it's been almost ten years since I first left for Ethiopia and lately I've been wondering where all the time went.

    Feel free to ask me any questions and good luck!
    Thanks for your reply. I'm flexible and realize that calling and emailing will be pretty much out of the question. I don't even care where I go.

    What did you do while you were in Ethiopia? The website says you don't have to have a college degree so would they take a CNA with 6 years experience? Probably not. I'm on the fence btw surg tech and paralegal. I figure if I do surg tech and have some experience then they might take me.
  8. Visit  alem-tsahai profile page
    0
    Hi again,

    I was an English teacher(!). I did not like it, way too many kids to teach in a small classroom setting with no supplies. I did what I could, but that was the end of teaching for me after I left! The experience itself was awesome, you really learn to live with less and be happy. No running water, no lights, no toilets. No junk food! But the people were so welcoming it was really worth it.

    Not sure about the education requirements for joining PC. I know they don't require you to have a degree but I'm not sure what the rules are. When I was in PC not having a degree meant you had a specific set of skills (e.g. a diploma trained RN). I'm in no way saying that being a CNA isn't a skill cuz it certainly is. I would check with them because they have probably changed all that now. If you decide to go, and I highly recommend you do, you will never ever regret it!! I think more Americans should do it, we tend to be a little too insulated in my opinion.

    Anyway, let me know how it goes. Like I said before, two years goes by very fast. Good luck!
  9. Visit  Yemminie profile page
    0
    These days a ton of PCVs have regular or semi-regular access to the internet, plus cell phones, and there are about a zillion Peace Corps blogs out there. Check out http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/ to read some of them. Also, check out http://groups.yahoo.com/group/peacecorps2/. There are a ton of active members, and it's a great place to ask questions. Also, as far as education goes, here's a link to what the PC website has to say: http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?...estu.associate

    I hope that helps!
  10. Visit  Ariko profile page
    0
    Usually in developing countries public health issues, like hygiene and vaccinations, are the major issues.

    I was in Ghana looooooooong ago and worked on a Cholera epidemic during the first part of my service. Later I was teaching at the University of Science and Technology in Kumasi.

    I got my RN some years after I returned, but even 30 years later, telling someone you were a PCV can open doors and evokes respect, much like telling someone you are a nurse. They know you are not in it for the $$$.
  11. Visit  Apple30 profile page
    0
    how much money do they get each month?
    is it possible to survive on that amount?
  12. Visit  kstergio profile page
    0
    I am interested in volunteering for the Peace Corps but I am trying to work a couple years to get experience, I just graduated. The only thing I am afraid of is loosing some basic nursing skills since the Peace Corps for nurses seems to be aimed for at education. Does anyone know how much hands on care nurses can do for the Peace Corps or is it mostly education?
  13. Visit  ibambamama profile page
    2
    Hi there -
    I was a PCV in Central Africa (1998-2001) and am now a nurse. It had been my lifelong dream and encourage anyone who feels the desire to do it, to follow that.
    Although many volunteers work as teachers, about 10-20% work in health, which is what I did (and this was before I ever even thought about becoming a nurse!). I lived in a small remote village and worked at the local mother-baby clinic (which was staffed by a handful of nurses and two local midwives - we never had a doctor and only sometimes had medicine). I did a lot of health education, as well as baby-weighing, vaccination, and the occassional semi-medical task (because I was 'the white American' people often assumed I was a doctor and wanted me to do all kinds of things....)
    As someone with healthcare training/background you would have a great deal to offer in the countries where Peace Corps volunteers serve.
    Good luck!
    FinallyThere and natrgrrl like this.
  14. Visit  Dinsey profile page
    0
    I was told by a PC recruiter at a career fair a few years ago that they didn't want nurses. He said that they were not set up to utilize our skills and did not want us to lose them while we were in PC.

    I was about to start my nursing program and ******. Maybe it's not accurate...


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