Baylor Plan?

  1. 0
    Can someone explain to me the concept of this Baylor Plan? A classmate tells me this is how she will work once we are out of school. What is it?
    Commuter, I know you got something for me on this!:spin:

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  2. 21 Comments...

  3. 0
    A Baylor Plan is a work schedule where you work every weekend only, but get full-time pay and benefits. It's often a high-demand schedule for people who are going to school or who have young children, because it leaves your week free.
    J
  4. 0
    Work double shifts every weekend (2 days, 16 hour shifts) for a total of 32 hours and get paid for 40 hours.
  5. 1
    Quote from jorlsu
    Commuter, I know you got something for me on this!:spin:
    Yes, I sure do have something for you on this issue!

    I've been working the Baylor plan at my workplace for nearly 2 years. In fact, it will be 2 years in February of next year. The Baylor plan at my place of employment involves working two 16 hour shifts per week back-to-back on Saturday and Sunday, having 5 days off in a row from Monday through Friday, and getting paid for a full 40 hour work week.

    There are variations of the Baylor plan: getting paid 32 hours to work 24 hours, etc. In my opinion, it's a sweet deal since I can attend school full-time during the week or take mini vacations without using any accrued vacation time.
    sealford likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from loricatus
    Work double shifts every weekend (2 days, 16 hour shifts) for a total of 32 hours and get paid for 40 hours.

    At the real Baylor (and the other Baylor hospitals) it involves just two TWELVE HOUR shifts. My gosh, when did a 16 hr shift ever get approved as a safe thing to do ?
  7. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Yes, I sure do have something for you on this issue!

    I've been working the Baylor plan at my workplace for nearly 2 years. In fact, it will be 2 years in February of next year. The Baylor plan at my place of employment involves working two 16 hour shifts per week back-to-back on Saturday and Sunday, having 5 days off in a row from Monday through Friday, and getting paid for a full 40 hour work week.

    There are variations of the Baylor plan: getting paid 32 hours to work 24 hours, etc. In my opinion, it's a sweet deal since I can attend school full-time during the week or take mini vacations without using any accrued vacation time.
    Ok Commuter, what do you think of this option being used with new grads? Is it not really preferred for newbies since on weekends there is more of a light crew working? I ask because it sounds like a great option, something I would be interested in if I decide to do LTC upon graduation. But, it would make sense that one needs to be comfortable and fully aware of their surroundings, the routines, how stuff works, etc, before being thrown in on weekends only. If you need extra help as a newbie, there wouldn't be as much, or any, assistance for you, eh?
  8. 0
    i'm interested in the response to the last question as well. i'm a new lvn graduate, haven't started working yet, but have already done and passed state boards. how safe is this for a new grad. and a question for you, the commuter...what type of facility do you work in?
  9. 1
    Quote from carachel2
    At the real Baylor (and the other Baylor hospitals) it involves just two TWELVE HOUR shifts. My gosh, when did a 16 hr shift ever get approved as a safe thing to do ?
    People have been working "doubles" (double (16-hour) shifts) since time immemorial. Not something you'd want to do every day, but a "safe thing to do" once in a while.

    Years ago, on order to be able to pursue the subspecialty I wanted, I worked for a few years at a facility two hours from my home -- I worked a modified Baylor plan consisting of 16 hour shifts on Saturday and Sunday (7a - 11p). I stayed over Saturday night, so I only drove one round trip each week. Worked 32 hours, got paid for 40 and got full benefits, and looooooved having a two-day workweek! Sure, the weekends themselves were demanding and tiring, but I had the whole rest of the week to rest up. Went back to school and finished a BSN during that time, since I had so much free time.
    TheCommuter likes this.
  10. 3
    they are not referring to baylor hospital. i have always worked the baylor plan right now it is work 32 et paid for 40. like the commuter said it is 5 days off and great for students. i am so used to doing these long shifts that it is not a big deal to me. i personally don't understand how anyone would want to clock in and look at the same people , get yelled at by the same admin team and get drawn into the same drama 5 days a week....

    Quote from carachel2
    at the real baylor (and the other baylor hospitals) it involves just two twelve hour shifts. my gosh, when did a 16 hr shift ever get approved as a safe thing to do ?
    azcna, pedsnurze1, and TheCommuter like this.
  11. 1
    Quote from jorlsu
    Ok Commuter, what do you think of this option being used with new grads? Is it not really preferred for newbies since on weekends there is more of a light crew working? I ask because it sounds like a great option, something I would be interested in if I decide to do LTC upon graduation. But, it would make sense that one needs to be comfortable and fully aware of their surroundings, the routines, how stuff works, etc, before being thrown in on weekends only. If you need extra help as a newbie, there wouldn't be as much, or any, assistance for you, eh?
    I was hired onto weekends as a new nurse with no problems, although my orientation was only 1.5 days long. You've got to be assertive, ask your coworkers questions when you're unsure, and consult the weekend house supervisor when you need assistance.

    LTCs are not known for long orientations and preceptorships, anyway. The longest orientation period I've ever received from an LTC was 2 whopping days. No matter which shift you work, you need to take accountability for how much you learn because, in LTC, no one will take you by the hand and teach you anything. An assertive personality is the key to survival.
    GeauxNursing likes this.


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