Was going to earn my NP, but not anymore. Was going to earn my NP, but not anymore. | allnurses

Was going to earn my NP, but not anymore.

  1. 0 Now that the AACN is requiring nurse practitioners to have a doctorate's degree, I no longer plan to go on to become a nurse practitioner.

    Why?

    simple. Because some genious decided to force nurses that want to become an NP to earn a doctorate's degree, but the pay won't change.

    The AACN's position is that they wanted a "parity degree" to the M.D, except that they didnt actually create parity. Imagine finding out that RN's will no longer be paid as an RN, and instead will be paid LPN salary instead. What would be the motivation to continue on?

    Same with the NPs. Why earn a doctorate's degree and get paid the same as other NP's who have an MSN instead?! Makes absolutely NO sense.

    Oh, and I've already seen the strife that MD's are putting up trying to not allow DNP's to call themselves "Doctor". Would I earn my DNP degree, I would reserve the right to be addressed by the title that the degree confers.

    So, yeah...the AACN just "priced me out" of the market because I simply cannot afford to be in school for the extra years to earn the doctorate's degree, and come out making what someone with a master's degree makes. Extra student loans to pay off, extra years working the night shift, etc etc. Not worth it.
  2. 14 Comments

  3. Visit  CCRNDiva profile page
    2
    The AACN cannot legislate or require anything. They have made the recommendation that the DNP be the entry to practice for NPs but the power to require that remains with the states and accrediting bodies. So far neither the state boards nor the accrediting bodies have mandated the DNP.
    SweettartRN and Freedom42 like this.
  4. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    1
    Don't worry, AACN wants BSN to be the entry level to nursing and have for the last 30 years! Is it a reality?? Uh nope!

    Don't sweat it - head on over and get your MSN!
    missvictoriat likes this.
  5. Visit  BabyLady profile page
    3
    Quote from CrashVector
    Now that the AACN is requiring nurse practitioners to have a doctorate's degree, I no longer plan to go on to become a nurse practitioner.

    Why?

    simple. Because some genious decided to force nurses that want to become an NP to earn a doctorate's degree, but the pay won't change.

    The AACN's position is that they wanted a "parity degree" to the M.D, except that they didnt actually create parity. Imagine finding out that RN's will no longer be paid as an RN, and instead will be paid LPN salary instead. What would be the motivation to continue on?

    Same with the NPs. Why earn a doctorate's degree and get paid the same as other NP's who have an MSN instead?! Makes absolutely NO sense.

    Oh, and I've already seen the strife that MD's are putting up trying to not allow DNP's to call themselves "Doctor". Would I earn my DNP degree, I would reserve the right to be addressed by the title that the degree confers.

    So, yeah...the AACN just "priced me out" of the market because I simply cannot afford to be in school for the extra years to earn the doctorate's degree, and come out making what someone with a master's degree makes. Extra student loans to pay off, extra years working the night shift, etc etc. Not worth it.
    I'll be honest..I think you need to do some long, hard research if being an NP is what you want to do.

    First, nothing worthwhile is easy to get...keep that in mind.

    Second, the DNP is NOT a done deal in ANY state...they have not got a single BON to sign off on that and many colleges are NOT changing their NP programs to DNP-only for that very reason.

    The majority of the DNP programs that I have found? Are ONE year longer than an MSN only program and you SAVE TIME AND MONEY going from a BSN to a DNP, than the BSN, MSN, DNP route.

    Yes, you would be able to refer to yourself as "doctor"...physicians have a "doctor of medicine" degree, you would have a "doctor of nursing" degree...legally, they DO NOT have more of a right to be called by their proper title than you do. It is not up to their profession to decide what nurses are called.

    But seriously...you really, really need to do more research because you are very misinformed on many levels.
    choco80, eagle78, and elkpark like this.
  6. Visit  Annaiya profile page
    0
    I agree with BabyLady, you need to do more research. Aside from it not being mandated by the states at this point, all of the preliminary salary data that I have seen have shown on average a $10,000/year salary difference between MSN and DNP NPs. I don't remember which association published these data but I think I saw it about a year ago. Also, the reason for the change is to try to ensure competency and best possible patient outcomes. There is more to being a healthcare provider than just salary. If salary is the only reason you would want to become an NP then I agree it is not a good choice for you. At my facility experienced RNs make more than starting NPs, salary has nothing to do with why I want to be an NP.

    As for the Doctor title, last I heard (I think it was on allnurses) there are 7 states that have passed legislation preventing DNPs from calling themselves Dr. The AMA has lobbied hard to prevent DNPs from being able to use the title Dr. It is sad that state legislators would let this happen. It is a good reason why supporting nursing organizations and paying attention to legislation in your state is so important.
  7. Visit  BabyLady profile page
    0
    Quote from Annaiya
    As for the Doctor title, last I heard (I think it was on allnurses) there are 7 states that have passed legislation preventing DNPs from calling themselves Dr. The AMA has lobbied hard to prevent DNPs from being able to use the title Dr. It is sad that state legislators would let this happen. It is a good reason why supporting nursing organizations and paying attention to legislation in your state is so important.
    If you have any information on which states, I would like to see (not questioning you...just very curious to read up on their rationale).

    The reason that particularly baffles me, is that in every state, if you have achieved a doctorate degree by ACADEMIC RIGHT you have the right to be addressed as "doctor" regardless of what setting. That is why I don't understand how a state can turn around and disallow it...are they doing the same for college professors?

    If anyone is misusing the title it is physicians....THEY are the ones that need to be educated.

    But if it is happening, it's is because legislatures are not healthcare professionals.
  8. Visit  sirI profile page
    0
    Quote from BabyLady
    If you have any information on which states, I would like to see (not questioning you...just very curious to read up on their rationale).

    The reason that particularly baffles me, is that in every state, if you have achieved a doctorate degree by ACADEMIC RIGHT you have the right to be addressed as "doctor" regardless of what setting. That is why I don't understand how a state can turn around and disallow it...are they doing the same for college professors?

    If anyone is misusing the title it is physicians....THEY are the ones that need to be educated.

    But if it is happening, it's is because legislatures are not healthcare professionals.

    According to the 2008 Pearson Report, 7 states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio,
    Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutes or regulations prohibiting a nurse practitioner (NP) to use the title of Doctor: http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/...son_Report.pdf

    I do not know if there is a more recent report updating the states.
  9. Visit  sandnnw profile page
    0
    Wow, interesting.

    So does this apply to "Dr. Phil" and the DCs, DPTs, DPharm DAud, PsyD and PhDs?

    A bit silly and I'm sure some attorneys would find discriminatory. It's amazing how much time our legislators have on their hands these days. Let's go pick on a hand full of NPs who think they are real "doctors." Never mind they have earned a doctorate degree.
  10. Visit  BabyLady profile page
    0
    Quote from sirI
    According to the 2008 Pearson Report, 7 states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio,
    Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutes or regulations prohibiting a nurse practitioner (NP) to use the title of Doctor: http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/...son_Report.pdf

    I do not know if there is a more recent report updating the states.
    Thank you Siri.

    I actually did some research and found the same information.

    I could say was, "Wow!" Is this all our legislatures have to do?

    Seriously...that is MASSIVELY insulting to the profession!!!!
  11. Visit  BabyLady profile page
    1
    ....on a side note...why don't legislatures do this:

    Why don't they pass a law requiring all medical residents to inform their patients when giving advice that they have only graduated from medical school and are not legally authorized to practice independently without the supervision of a board-certified MD.

    The general public doesn't even know the difference between the two...and Lord knows you won't catch a medical resident explaining the difference!!!!
    playboyesquiere likes this.
  12. Visit  rmicu profile page
    0
    "According to the 2008 Pearson Report, 7 states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio,
    Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutes or regulations prohibiting a nurse practitioner (NP) to use the title of Doctor: http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/...son_Report.pdf"

    It sounds like these decisions are based on the MSN prepared NP, not an NP w/ a doctorate degree.

    To Original Poster

    I'm with traumaRN---the BSN is still not a requirement, so don't get your knickers in a knot about a recommendation for a DNP. Based on history, it is HIGHLY unlikely a DNP will become a requirement any time soon.

    From a realistic standpoint- who would teach it? There are hardly enough MSN educators to teach BSN programs, let alone enough instructors for DNP programs.

    Perhaps, you would consider slowing down, taking a deep breath and reading more fact- based information from reliable sources and then decide what is best for you and your family.
    I wish you well in whatever you ultimately decide.
    Take care
  13. Visit  Annaiya profile page
    1
    Quote from rmicu
    "According to the 2008 Pearson Report, 7 states (Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio,
    Oklahoma, and Oregon) have statutes or regulations prohibiting a nurse practitioner (NP) to use the title of Doctor: http://www.acnpweb.org/files/public/...son_Report.pdf"

    It sounds like these decisions are based on the MSN prepared NP, not an NP w/ a doctorate degree.
    No it is based on a doctorate degree. I did some looking on the AMA website and it is targeted at anyone with a doctoral degree who is not a physician in a medical setting.
    BabyLady likes this.
  14. Visit  BabyLady profile page
    1
    The more I read these, it is just another reason why the profession of nursing needs to GET ORGANIZED.

    There are more of us, than there are of them.

    Most RN's with a DNP, have spent JUST AS MUCH TIME in school as an MD grad, who has spent typically 4 years.

    So, why do they think they have more of a 'right' to use the title than we do? Clinical setting or not!!
    sandnnw likes this.

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