Did you do all readings in FNP school?

  1. I'm currently in my undergrad RN program. I RARELY read the textbook...I just use it for reference if I don't understand a given topic. I'm near the top of my class, so this has been working for me and I'm near the end of my program.

    FNP students/grads...did you read all reading assignments? Do you think my method is sustainable for FNP school?

    Any and all replies are greatly appreciated.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   GoodNP
    Interesting question. Keep in mind that this website is regularly viewed by MDs and medical students. Do we really want NPs admitting they didn't read all their assignments?
    Last edit by GoodNP on Nov 6
  4. by   NEMurse95
    Quote from GoodNP
    Interesting question. Keep in mind that this website is regularly viewed by MDs and medical students. Do we really want NPs admitting they didn't read all their assignments?
    I understand the apprehension, but I think ALL medical professionals ought to be impressed/unimpressed by other medical professionals by their clinical knowledge base and competence RATHER than what methods they used to become competent/knowledgable. I don't learn very well by reading, so I use a number of other manners to learn/retain info. I completely get where you're coming from, though.
  5. by   traumaRUs
    Moved to student NP forum
  6. by   shibaowner
    At least in my NP program, you HAD to read the textbook in addition to reviewing powerpoints. Much of the exam material was not on the powerpoints and only in the text. You might be able to get a C on an exam by only studying powerpoints. And most grad schools consider a C unacceptable and would send you into counseling.

    Some graduate NP classes do not require a textbooks, but have required readings pulled from journal articles. Other classes will require a textbook AND reading required articles. However, you can ask your instructor if you have to read all the articles - some of them will turn out to be optional.

    An NP program leads to a graduate degree. In grad school, you are expected to be able to read A LOT of scholarly material and also to write in a scholarly manner. You will have to write a lot of research papers, which will require reading scholarly journal articles - a lot of them. That material will not be on any powerpoint.

    As an NP, you will be expected to regularly read the professional literature. None of those journals publish articles in powerpoint format.

    Bluntly, in my opinion, if you can't read a textbook or scholarly journal article, then you can't get through NP school, nor can you be a competent professional. If you don't want to read, then choose another career path in nursing.
  7. by   NEMurse95
    Quote from shibaowner
    Bluntly, in my opinion, if you can't read a textbook or scholarly journal article, then you can't get through NP school, nor can you be a competent professional. If you don't want to read, then choose another career path in nursing.
    For one, thank you for taking the time to write a reply. That being said, I am more than capable of reading textbooks and scholarly journal article. When I signed up for nursing school, I did so with the expectation and anticipation that it would be a lifelong learning commitment. My question was simply a question asking if my study habits would translate well to NP school.

    I'm just going to say I hope you're more tactful and speak more therapeutically with your patients
  8. by   lhflanurseNP
    I read my assignments. Some books were "worthless" so I found other resources. I returned to school as a much older student (well into the middle 50s) and was overwhelmed with the volume of reading, but am glad that I did the research. I know other students who were able to "gloss over" the reading and seem to know EXACTLY what was important, but I just never learned this "skill".
  9. by   Wsmfp88
    I wondered this myself before beginning my FNP program and the answer is really dependent upon the course and your learning style. For example, the theory and research type courses can be easily handled without the text book. They are great for reference, but I never get too upset if I don't complete all or any of those readings. As for the core courses (FNP, Women's Health, Peds, etc), which I assume you are referring to, it sure does help put things in context. You can only absorb so much from short-hand or bulleted text on a power point. Further, it isn't just the textbook that is "required reading". The algorithms and evidence based practice updates are often (or should be) provided and need to be studied as well. Like you, in undergrad I mostly reviewed the power points and you-tube videos to clarify patho and graduated top of my class. However, grad school is a different beast and I have found that while incorporating methods best suited to your learning style helps enhance the learning process, it isn't helpful as a substitution as much of the test content comes from the textbook. Also, you may find that once you're at this point in your career that you actually want to read the textbook so that you don't miss anything. There is just SO much to learn and responsibility is high, but you'll find a rhythm that works for you. Best of luck to you.
  10. by   renzlao
    I am doing the FNP at USC. I read the textbook, rewatch lectures 3x, read powerpoints. There are lots of resources online ( I actually use the resources from MDs) that I read to supplement my learning. I am doing this not only for myself but for my patients.
  11. by   Dodongo
    For the universal fluff courses (ethics, EBP, Policy) I did what I needed to complete the assignments/exams and moved on. For the medical/clinical courses I read it all. The entire text book. And multiple texts not required for the class. I pretty much read all the time.

    If you aren't doing this to learn as much as you can, you shouldn't be doing it. This is to become a provider, responsible for working up patients, diagnosing and prescribing therapy. Laziness and anti-intellectualism should be rejected.
  12. by   Fatguyinalittlecoat
    Quote from Dodongo
    If you aren't doing this to learn as much as you can, you shouldn't be doing it. This is to become a provider, responsible for working up patients, diagnosing and prescribing therapy. Laziness and anti-intellectualism should be rejected.
    This x 1000...
  13. by   shibaowner
    Quote from NEMurse95
    For one, thank you for taking the time to write a reply. That being said, I am more than capable of reading textbooks and scholarly journal article. When I signed up for nursing school, I did so with the expectation and anticipation that it would be a lifelong learning commitment. My question was simply a question asking if my study habits would translate well to NP school.

    I'm just going to say I hope you're more tactful and speak more therapeutically with your patients
    You are not even an NP. I suggest you learn to show more respect to your superiors if you want to succeed.

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