Becoming an NP with little to no nursing experience?? - page 17

Hello to all!!! I have worked as a parmamedic for 20 years, have a B.A. in Economics, and I wanted to advance my career in healthcare. I was originally looking to pursue the PA route, but for... Read More

  1. by   Uberman5000
    Quote from morganvibes
    I'm not a new Grad but I hope to be by Fall of 2009.
    I just got accepted to Vanderbilt's "Bridge" direct entry NP program (FNP) and I have no prior nursing experience.
    To let people know what this program entails, as it seems some people think it is so incredibly short to get your MSN:
    Although the program is only 24 months long, it is actually the equivelent of 3 years of college- it is 6 semesters which are completed in 2 calendar years. so it is not really only 2 years of schooling, it is 3 years. (we will attend full time semesters in the summer months).
    Also, you cannot just walk off the street and get your MSN and NP with this program, you must have many pre-requisitie classes equivelent to 3 years of college (minimum is 78 credits) including all science classes that you would have been taking if you had been on a BSN track.
    I will actually end up having over 100 college credits and I already have an Associates degree (non-nursing).
    So in actuality, a person who graduates from this accelerated program will have a minimum of 6 years of college, which is the same as having gotten the BSN in 4 years and then the MSN in 2 years which is the "normal" route. The only way that this differs is that they let you do it faster calendar-wise and they give you credit for your previous college courses instead of making you jump through hoops for an extra year because you need to take a specific history or sociolgy class that they require. Many schools for BSN have such strict requirements for these non-nursing courses that they make it problematic for an older student to graduate in a reasonable amount of time.

    These direct entry programs have obviously been created to fill a need for NP's that some of the posters here seem to think does not exist. But I have heard from friends in the program that last year's graduates all got jobs right after school and many had several offers to choose from. Maybe Nashville is a good market, but I don't feel at all that I won't be able to get a job right away after graduation.
    I think some nurses are just annoyed by these programs because they didn't exist before and they had to do it the long way. But they are here now and since I am an older student and time is very important, and money is important, I have to do the best I can. I think some of us will be great NP's right out of school and some will need time, but that is like anything else. From the articles that were posted earlier in this thread, it seems that there is no data that shows that new grad NP's without RN experience were nay different than those with nursing experience.

    I think it would be great to perhaps add one year of "residency" for new grad NP's. It sounds like that would make everyone on both sides happier and probably make us all more competent as well.

    I am really excited and can't wait to start.
    Morgan
    Thank you for clarifying these things Morgan, you are a living example of why the naysayers are wrong. It doesnt take 20 years to learn how to take vital signs after all. Good luck in your NP program, you will do good things I assume..
  2. by   Uberman5000
    Quote from Miss Ludie
    Been scanning this thread with some amount of interest. I feel that some here are playing devil's advocate, shaking cages, pulling chains. But all in all there has been some intriguing debate.

    There is one word that has bothered me Uberman and that is:



    Is this intentional misspelling in order to proclaim your Uber-station in life? It just jumps off the page. The closest I could find to a definition of the P word is that of phallacea which is a family of fungi.

    Meanwhile, I will return to my silent spot and read on.
    Yeah it is a play on words like "Phear me" - nice job though.
    Last edit by sirI on Mar 3, '07 : Reason: unnecessary remark and off-topic - please stick to the topic
  3. by   Uberman5000
    Quote from ginger58
    "Personally I think the idea is ludicrous! I became an RN first, worked in my area for several years and went to NNP school."

    If you think I've made that statement because I walked through three feet of snow 20 miles to school you're really out there.
    Nursing is a profession. People build skills in nursing school, see how a hospital runs, what the different roles are, etc. I think this is all part of being a nurse. As far as people without this previous education being molded easily and don't have "bad habits", that sounds like crap to me. You think every nurse has bad habits or isn't able to be molded? I find this offensive to those of us that are nurses.
    There may be direct entry programs that are working well and putting out decent NPs, but please get yourselves away from the thinking that "some people think you should have to eat crap because they had to back in the day. But it makes no difference really..." I personally don't buy this and time will tell. Best wishes for your success.
    Well Ginger I am just having trouble understanding why some people are in such denial regarding the New direct entry APRN programs. I have stated that you dont necessarily need previous APRN experience to get a job as an APRN.....do BSN students need BSN experience to get a job as an RN? Answer = No. IT doesn't take someone 20 years to learn how to do blood pressure, give shots, put a thermometer in someones mouth, etc....At least it doesnt take me that long.
  4. by   Uberman5000
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    Everyone has an opinion and I respect those who differ from my own, so please show the same courtesy...

    In MY opinion, experience as a bedside nurse should be required before entering NP school. I agree with the rationale of others who say, ADVANCED practice nursing is just that, ADVANCED. Meaning you have MASTERED basic nursing principles and can now ADVANCE not only your knowledge base, but your skill proficiency, and your scope of practice.

    Hmm, sounds a lot like the 90% of the theories that I heard in grad school that went out the door when I entered the "real world". Like I keep saying 1000 times over and over again, why does it take someone 5 years to learn how to do vitals, give injections and meds? Do you not realize that most people that go into APRN programs right after BSN graduation are actually working as RN's in addition to going to school? Is that not "experience" enough? Or do you still think that you need at least 5 years of takign someones blood pressure before you can "get to the next level" of ADVANCED practice..how do you define that by the way..?

    Quote from asoldierswife05
    Passing the NCLEX only determines whether a nurse posesses the MINIMUM level of knowledge needed to provide safe bedside care. You have enough knowledge not to harm your patient, and hopefully enough knowledge to help the patient improve. To go directly into the NP program, although I am not disputing that it gives you a great wealth of information and you may feel confident in acting in such a role, you still haven't had enough patient contact and experience to have MASTERED basic nursing care and possess the proper competency to ADVANCE your practice into DIRECTING the treatment plans for your client in the EXPANDED scope of NP.
    Right...and those nurses with "limited knowledge" are actually able to work as registered nurses right after graduation!!!! Kind of like how alot of direct entry APRN's get jobs as APRN's right after graduation!!!! As i said before, most people that are in a direct entry program are working as RN's so they are gaining experience while attending school, and even if they didn't they could would still get out of school, get jobs and do well, as most are now.

    Quote from asoldierswife05
    It has always boggled my mind why there were direct entry programs for NPs, and to hear students say that once they graduate they will not even look for a nursing job but go directly for NP.
    It has always boggled my mind why people think it takes someone 10 years to learn how to take blood pressure, read medical records , follow doctors orders and give medications. If I dont have to get a job as an RN working for 5 years before I get my APRN, why should I? Because someone on the allnurses forum says I should? Come on you have to give me a better reason than that.

    Quote from asoldierswife05
    There are still areas of nursing that do require you to have a min 1 yr of experience before you can work as a new grad (some surgery/trauma/ICU/PACU units...etc.) To advance your degree to CRNA a minimum of 1 yr in critical care is required. So if I have to gain a year's experience out of school to be considered safe to recover a pt from surgery in the PACU, then why do I not have to have a year's experience before I am considered safe enough to diagnose and treat an illness?
    Yeah, sad isnt it? Well, not sad for me because that is the way I did it but I can see how it causes people who disagree with this option such pain. NEWS FLASH --> If you are working as an RN you are not necessarily getting a great deal of experience diagnosing and treating illness. As far as I understand, the medical doctors are the ones that do the diagnose and ORDER YOU to do NURSING INTERVENTIONS and give medication. So you want me to work as an RN for a year before I go to a completely different setting in primary care as an FNP, doing completely different work, i.e., diagnosing and treating illness and this would satisfy you? Sorry it doesn't make any sense when one looks at it rationally.

    Quote from asoldierswife05
    You cannot ADVANCE without first having become proficient in the basic aspects of care.
    One opinion that is obviously a minority, as evidenced by the direct entry programs currently abound and graduating NP's everyday.

    Quote from asoldierswife05
    It would BEHOOVE you to gain some working knowledge/experience, excercise your critical thinking ability, and master basic nursing concepts before attempting to take on more responsibility and expand your nursing role.
    I do not find this advice practical or wise, at least in terms of the experience I have had. In life you only have a limited amount of time..why waste it doing something you dont need to do when you can do more in less time....
  5. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Uberman5000
    Hmm, sounds a lot like the 90% of the theories that I heard in grad school that went out the door when I entered the "real world". Like I keep saying 1000 times over and over again, why does it take someone 5 years to learn how to do vitals, give injections and meds? Do you not realize that most people that go into APRN programs right after BSN graduation are actually working as RN's in addition to going to school? Is that not "experience" enough? Or do you still think that you need at least 5 years of takign someones blood pressure before you can "get to the next level" of ADVANCED practice..how do you define that by the way..?
    You crack me up...seriously. I find your argument to be incredibly weak. You can keep repeating 1000 times more that it doesn't take someone 5 years to learn to do vitals, give injections, or meds because it's a mute point...certainly not the logic being used to support experience for entry into advanced nursing practice. For one reason, you're right...it takes about a day to learn those skills. A monkey could do it. However, you assume that is all the nurse is gaining in his/her experience that will influence his/her advanced practice. I assure you that the nurses role is far superior to your generalization and the experience gained is deserving of far more credit. Critical thinking is developed and sharpened over time through experience only...not found in books. And I am sure you agree that an APRN's worth is in their knowledge and ability to critically think, not their ability to perform a routine skill. Your argument is not only selling bedside nurses short, but APRNs as well.

    Of course, I realize that APRNs work as RNs while they are finishing their degree and I never disputed that it does not count as experience. However, I still support a minimum of 5 years practice being allowed to advance. A standardized approach with clear levels of achievement and qualification is not only good for the practicing nurse and the patient population, but it is good for the nursing profession when you examine it from a wider perspective. 5 years does not seem like an unreasonable requirement to get to 'the next level' as you put it...how do i define it? I don't have to. It's defined in your state nurse practice act. Wider scope of practice. More professional responsibility. More liability.

    I don't make the rules and you are free to move on to NP or CNS if you wish without any experience. I would not choose to do so. And it's not because I think every nurse should 'do their time' at the bedside, it's because I whole heartedly believe it will produce better APRNs and command respect for the knowledge/experience/skill of those who are advancing our profession.

    Good Luck to you.
  6. by   core0
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    You crack me up...seriously. I find your argument to be incredibly weak. You can keep repeating 1000 times more that it doesn't take someone 5 years to learn to do vitals, give injections, or meds because it's a mute point...certainly not the logic being used to support experience for entry into advanced nursing practice. For one reason, you're right...it takes about a day to learn those skills. A monkey could do it. However, you assume that is all the nurse is gaining in his/her experience that will influence his/her advanced practice. I assure you that the nurses role is far superior to your generalization and the experience gained is deserving of far more credit. Critical thinking is developed and sharpened over time through experience only...not found in books. And I am sure you agree that an APRN's worth is in their knowledge and ability to critically think, not their ability to perform a routine skill. Your argument is not only selling bedside nurses short, but APRNs as well.

    Of course, I realize that APRNs work as RNs while they are finishing their degree and I never disputed that it does not count as experience. However, I still support a minimum of 5 years practice being allowed to advance. A standardized approach with clear levels of achievement and qualification is not only good for the practicing nurse and the patient population, but it is good for the nursing profession when you examine it from a wider perspective. 5 years does not seem like an unreasonable requirement to get to 'the next level' as you put it...how do i define it? I don't have to. It's defined in your state nurse practice act. Wider scope of practice. More professional responsibility. More liability.

    I don't make the rules and you are free to move on to NP or CNS if you wish without any experience. I would not choose to do so. And it's not because I think every nurse should 'do their time' at the bedside, it's because I whole heartedly believe it will produce better APRNs and command respect for the knowledge/experience/skill of those who are advancing our profession.

    Good Luck to you.
    I will agree with your statements on nursing. Nursing is far more than taking temperatures and passing medications. I usually talk to the nurse before seeing the patient in the hospital. This is an important data point on how a professional views the patients condition (someone who is going to spend way more time with the patient than myself). I also make it a point to listen to the verbal and non-verbal cues of the nurse (saved my happy butt more than once).

    I'll play devil's advocate here. Is all nursing experience equally applicable or valuable? For example while a nursing administrator is still a nurse, is that experience relevant to NP school? Or another example if you do peds nursing is that experience as relevant to ANP as med/surg nursing? Some ARNP programs require a period of a certain type of nursing before school (CRNA comes to mind) but most do not. Just a thought.

    One thing that makes this difficult to evaluate is that most schools do not publish their pass rates or employment rates (that would be difficult to track). So there is no real data on whether NP's with experience are any different than NP's without experience. We have a similar debate in the PA world. One of the differences is that with a centralized application system we can tie this data to graduation rates and pass rates on the certification exam. I think this is the data that you would need for NP's to answer this question.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  7. by   Uberman5000
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    You crack me up...seriously. I find your argument to be incredibly weak. You can keep repeating 1000 times more that it doesn't take someone 5 years to learn to do vitals, give injections, or meds because it's a mute point...certainly not the logic being used to support experience for entry into advanced nursing practice.

    For one reason, you're right...it takes about a day to learn those skills. A monkey could do it. However, you assume that is all the nurse is gaining in his/her experience that will influence his/her advanced practice. I assure you that the nurses role is far superior to your generalization and the experience gained is deserving of far more credit.

    Critical thinking is developed and sharpened over time through experience only...not found in books. And I am sure you agree that an APRN's worth is in their knowledge and ability to critically think, not their ability to perform a routine skill. Your argument is not only selling bedside nurses short, but APRNs as well.

    Really? Hmmm, the evidence shows that you're argument is the weak one. Your argument is basically that direct entry programs should not exist, even if you aren't saying it directly, if you were in charge, that is what you're will would be as evidenced by what you are saying. You are stating that RN's need alot of real world experience before they can get to the next Uber Advanced Level Of "Advanced Practice Nurse". You further espouse that the "critical thinking skills" that you develop as an RN will be directly applicable to working as an FNP in a primary care setting. Hmmm, I have been in alot of different areas as a straight RN, you know what I did primarily? ASSESSMENT!!!!! Take vital, do blood pressure, clean someone up, give someone drug. I did not diagnose and treat disease get it? RN"s do not diagnose and treat disease I think that is what you fail to understand. Let me ask you a question, why do you think it takes someone say..oh, 10 years of being an RN before they are "advanced" enough for APRN - oh wait the "Critical Thinking Skills". The academic BS ivory tower buzz word which emanates throughout the halls of higher learning. I don't know about you, but I have always had the ability to think critically and utilize good common sense. Moreover, I can tell you that my experience as an RN has NOTHING TO DO WITH MY EXPERIENCE AS AN APRN, NOTHING. Unless of course you include taking vitals and the other psychomotor skills involved with with regular RNhood, all the things you said a monkey could do.

    Quote from asoldierswife05
    Of course, I realize that APRNs work as RNs while they are finishing their degree and I never disputed that it does not count as experience. However, I still support a minimum of 5 years practice being allowed to advance. A standardized approach with clear levels of achievement and qualification is not only good for the practicing nurse and the patient population, but it is good for the nursing profession when you examine it from a wider perspective. 5 years does not seem like an unreasonable requirement to get to 'the next level' as you put it...how do i define it? I don't have to. It's defined in your state nurse practice act. Wider scope of practice. More professional responsibility. More liability.
    That is nice that you support a minimum of 5 years of practice to be allowed to practice as an APRN - However, this is not the reality and I am a very successful living example of that. The 5 years is not unreasonable to you because you seem to believe that it magically takes 5 years before you are advanced enough to become more powerful, others do not want to sit around in say a PACU, doing vitals q 15 etc for 5 years when they could be doing something more, SOONER.

    Quote from asoldierswife05
    I don't make the rules and you are free to move on to NP or CNS if you wish without any experience. I would not choose to do so. And it's not because I think every nurse should 'do their time' at the bedside, it's because I whole heartedly believe it will produce better APRNs and command respect for the knowledge/experience/skill of those who are advancing our profession.
    LOL --> I mean, this is what the whole thing boils down to in my opinion. Can I ask you a question...deep down are you resentful of a nurse that goes into a direct entry program right after school because you didnt do it that way? I don't know about you, but as I have stated repeatedly, not everyone wants to "Do their time", doing assessments at the bedside WHEN THEY DON'T HAVE TO AND DONT NEED TO.

    Good luck 2 u as well.
  8. by   sirI
    Please........

    Let's not make this personal as in, "you, you, you......I, I, I....."

    Let's debate the topic of, "Becoming an NP with little to no nursing experience??", without personalizing the posts. This really serves no useful purpose other than to place the one being singled out - on the defensive.

    We are all professionals; have advanced to the position of APN. We have come to this via many different avenues of education and experience.

    So, in saying this, let's attempt to get along; keep it professional. Guide the ones along the way who are sincerely seeking information about this issue of, "experience or no", and stay away from the personalizations.

    Thank you.
  9. by   traumaRUs
    Ubernurse - I gather from your posts that you are a direct-entry APN? These programs are still pretty new. Did you find it easy to get an APN position right out of school? May I ask in what area? I am neither pro or con direct entry APN, I'm just curious if these new APNs can readily find jobs.

    I live in central IL and graduated from a CNS program last year. The job market is tight here for APNs. I got two job offers based on my RN experience of 14 years (this is what both practices told me). They had interviewed two other direct-entry APNs whom they (the prospective employers) weren't comfortable with their lack of experience.

    So...before I come on board with an opinon - I'd like to know the job market. We can argue all day about this but in the end if you can't get a job with your degree, its only a piece of paper.

    My next question is how did you negotiate a salary as an entry-level NP? (If that is what you are, of course). I was able to negotiate up $20,000 from what was initially offered by pointing out that I have already been published, have 14 solid years of acute care experience, have an excellent reputation with the MD staff that I work with, etc.. These are all things I would not have brought to the table as a new-grad entry-level APN.
  10. by   Uberman5000
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Ubernurse - I gather from your posts that you are a direct-entry APN? These programs are still pretty new. Did you find it easy to get an APN position right out of school? May I ask in what area? I am neither pro or con direct entry APN, I'm just curious if these new APNs can readily find jobs.

    I live in central IL and graduated from a CNS program last year. The job market is tight here for APNs. I got two job offers based on my RN experience of 14 years (this is what both practices told me). They had interviewed two other direct-entry APNs whom they (the prospective employers) weren't comfortable with their lack of experience.

    So...before I come on board with an opinon - I'd like to know the job market. We can argue all day about this but in the end if you can't get a job with your degree, its only a piece of paper.

    My next question is how did you negotiate a salary as an entry-level NP? (If that is what you are, of course). I was able to negotiate up $20,000 from what was initially offered by pointing out that I have already been published, have 14 solid years of acute care experience, have an excellent reputation with the MD staff that I work with, etc.. These are all things I would not have brought to the table as a new-grad entry-level APN.
    Hi -- I recall having this conversation with you previously. Refer to pages 7-8 on this topic. I have absolutely no interest in doing a research study or being "published". Rather than using that to market myself to someone who is going to pay me a salary, I create my own company and my own salary is based on the production from my company; I find this method works best for me because I have no ceiling. Although I didn't find school particularly challenging, I am not an academic....I am a business man first. My specialty is orthopedics/pain management but I really do everything I can if need be.
  11. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from core0
    I will agree with your statements on nursing. Nursing is far more than taking temperatures and passing medications. I usually talk to the nurse before seeing the patient in the hospital. This is an important data point on how a professional views the patients condition (someone who is going to spend way more time with the patient than myself). I also make it a point to listen to the verbal and non-verbal cues of the nurse (saved my happy butt more than once).
    Disregarding the advantage of previous nursing experience, or downplaying its benefit as merely useless (which some posters have done) is doing a disservice to the profession. I am glad that you support the value of bedside nurses. The more experience the nurse gains, the more efficiently he/she can recognize patient problems and intervene. Strong assessment skills would be a plus in advanced practice, I would think...although others seem to disagree. I wouldn't want an NP to diagnose/treat my condition unless I was confident in their assessment skills. Familiar working knowledge and hands on experience with a variety of disorders and their medical management gained from a few years at the bedside would also be a plus in advanced practice. Another advantage would be networking, with other physicians, nurses, and APRNs. I believe this experience is not only much more 'than taking a blood pressure', but incredibly beneficial when advancing into the higher levels of the profession.
    I'll play devil's advocate here. Is all nursing experience equally applicable or valuable? For example while a nursing administrator is still a nurse, is that experience relevant to NP school? Or another example if you do peds nursing is that experience as relevant to ANP as med/surg nursing? Some ARNP programs require a period of a certain type of nursing before school (CRNA comes to mind) but most do not. Just a thought.
    Excellent questions...all of which I have contemplated as well. The problem is that right now there is no standard. That is why I said previously that a standardized approach to the application and licensing process would do much for our profession. CRNAs, as you mentioned, DO have a standard and command great respect and a higher level of pay. Originally, advanced practices nurses were nurses with years of various clinical expertise that then were able to advance their knowledge and degree in order to perform higher level skills, even diagnose and treat minor illness/chronic conditions. It was a huge advance for our profession. Direct entry programs complicate things a bit, in my view. Now you have a pool of graduates with minimal experience to years of nursing experience. The "advanced" degree is merely a symbol of more education...not necessarily experience and expertise. There lies the problem. Because you need no previous experience, this also creates a larger pool of graduates for employers to choose from, those with less experience will command less pay...this leads to saturation in some areas of the country and lower levels of pay for all (unless you can do as another poster said and sell yourself and your experience well to command a higher salary).

    So what type of experience should one have? Obviously, a school nurse, office nurse, and critical care nurse would not be on equal footing clinically...although all may be experienced nurses. Pediatrics vs. geriatrics is also very different. What's the magic number...how many years of practice is adequate (1, 2...5? more?) There should be a set standard that is dependent upon which route you take as an APRN. For CRNA, its one year experience in critical care. For women's health, it seems only natural that the requirement should be in that setting. Same for psych, acute care, etc. It makes perfect sense that your experience should be relevant to your advanced practice. My general suggestion of five years is just that...a generalized suggestion to express the importance I place on previous experience in reference to advanced practice nurses. In reality, there needs to be specific requirements with very clear parameters based on concrete data that supports the rationale for requiring certain experienced levels of clinical competence.
    One thing that makes this difficult to evaluate is that most schools do not publish their pass rates or employment rates (that would be difficult to track). So there is no real data on whether NP's with experience are any different than NP's without experience. We have a similar debate in the PA world. One of the differences is that with a centralized application system we can tie this data to graduation rates and pass rates on the certification exam. I think this is the data that you would need for NP's to answer this question.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    I agree. The lack of data on the subject is a major wrinkle in the system. Everyone's opinion, whether for or opposed to requiring previous experience, is merely subjective and is just as valid as anothers...until concrete data proves otherwise. I feel that if that data were available, it would clearly show a positive correlation between previous years of experience and the likelihood of the patient to experience a good clinical outcome.:wink2:




    Finally, to answer Uberman directly...yes, I DO respect direct entry APRNs, even though I don't believe it is the most appropriate route into advanced practice. It's not personal to me, it's just my opinion. Like the mod pointed out, it is best to keep things non personal on these boards.
  12. by   mvanz9999
    I have been reading this, and will offer my un-qualified opinion. Basically what I think is this: direct-entry programs are here to stay. Yes, they are new, but they have been around long enough that I believe they will become a permanent fixture in some schools.

    Whether previous RN experience is required sort of becomes a non-issue as these pograms ARE here and ARE turning out graduates.

    I think that it will be extremely difficult, but not impossible, to find work as an APN with no previous RN experience. Since I live in Illinois I am only considering the way the programs here work. I will have some years of RN experience in order to graduate.

    As time passes, APN's will continue to be present in many or most settings. This is already starting to happen. I suspect that direct-entry APNs will be very suspect for a long time, but will eventually become accepted as any APN.

    As has been previously stated, it is apparent that SOME physicians actually prefer RNs with less experience. These are the places that direct-entry students will find work. It will be difficult, but not impossible.

    I have seen both sides of this debate, and I'm not going to argue for either one. I am going to be a direct-entry student myself, and I will find work. If I cannot find immediate work as an APN, I can still work as an RN. My opinion is that there are many, many paths to ANY career in life. Neither path is necessarily better than the other. Just different.

    We are all on the same team, are we not?
  13. by   Uberman5000
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    Finally, to answer Uberman directly...yes, I DO respect direct entry APRNs, even though I don't believe it is the most appropriate route into advanced practice. It's not personal to me, it's just my opinion. Like the mod pointed out, it is best to keep things non personal on these boards.
    WHat makes you say I don't respect bedside nursing? Whoever said that? How am I minimizing bedside nursing by saying I DONT WANT TO DO IT. If I dont want to do something, I dont do it, its that simple. I dont want to be a meter maid or a postal worker, so I dont do it. Does that mean I dont respect them? No, its just I prefer not to do that type of work.

    Yeah - I am just happy I didnt have to go through bedside nursing for 5 years prior to obtaining my NP degree...its better left to someone else who likes that type of thing. Oh and if one doesnt desire to go to an NP with less than 5 years of bedside experience then they don't need to. Actually I don't recall any of my patients asking me a question like that so its not a concern for me.

    I will do whatever is in my power to encourage individuals who are getting their BSN to go immediately into the advanced degree program if they are so interested. As a matter of fact, this is my new passion in life.

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