Question - page 4

DO not post on facebook admin. I had an situation yesterday, that I was completely unprepared and unsure how to respond to this, especially in my school where Sex Ed is not allowed. I had a... Read More

  1. by   Amethya
    We did contact the parents, but CPS... not sure if I should have or not.
  2. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Chiming in on this thread, as I've been following it. OP, I wish your school had more resources for you, I do. I'm sorry they don't.

    But health = safety. STI transmission is a health risk and the spread of an infection. We help prevent the spread of infections. 1 in 4 new HIV diagnoses in this country are to a young person between the ages of 16 and 24. (Interesting link here: HIV in the United States | Statistics Overview | Statistics Center | HIV/AIDS | CDC. 4% of HIV diagnoses in 2015 were to those between 13 & 19 and 37% to those between 20 and 29).

    Helping a student stay healthy is my #1 concern. Sexual health is, well, part of health. I teach sex education. Comprehensive sex education. We start sex ed in grade 6 with puberty. I talk to student about STIs in grades 7, 8, 10, and 12. It is fact based only. I spend home information to parents and remind them they are the #1 sexual educator for their child. But some parents don't know where to start and need the resources and appreciate them. I have never had a parent opt their child out of sex ed.

    But I also live in a state that supports comprehensive sex education. I feel lucky about this, and I applaud those of you in states where comprehensive sex education is just not an option on the table. My state also protects conversations about a student's sexual health and I am not allowed to document anything about them in a student's school health record because of this protection.

    I tell students to find a caring adult. Sometimes this person isn't a parent. Sometimes it ends up starting with me and it is a very fine line to walk. I encourage them to talk with a caring adult at home, which may be an aunt, a sibling over the age of 18, even a close family friend. I have even help facilitate a parent discussion if the student is willing, but needs support to do so. But more than anything, I am happy they are willing to start any conversation with me at least. I'm happy they are willing to start with anyone.
  3. by   Amethya
    Quote from Jen-Elizabeth
    Chiming in on this thread, as I've been following it. OP, I wish your school had more resources for you, I do. I'm sorry they don't.

    But health = safety. STI transmission is a health risk and the spread of an infection. We help prevent the spread of infections. 1 in 4 new HIV diagnoses in this country are to a young person between the ages of 16 and 24. (Interesting link here: HIV in the United States | Statistics Overview | Statistics Center | HIV/AIDS | CDC. 4% of HIV diagnoses in 2015 were to those between 13 & 19 and 37% to those between 20 and 29).

    Helping a student stay healthy is my #1 concern. Sexual health is, well, part of health. I teach sex education. Comprehensive sex education. We start sex ed in grade 6 with puberty. I talk to student about STIs in grades 7, 8, 10, and 12. It is fact based only. I spend home information to parents and remind them they are the #1 sexual educator for their child. But some parents don't know where to start and need the resources and appreciate them. I have never had a parent opt their child out of sex ed.

    But I also live in a state that supports comprehensive sex education. I feel lucky about this, and I applaud those of you in states where comprehensive sex education is just not an option on the table. My state also protects conversations about a student's sexual health and I am not allowed to document anything about them in a student's school health record because of this protection.

    I tell students to find a caring adult. Sometimes this person isn't a parent. Sometimes it ends up starting with me and it is a very fine line to walk. I encourage them to talk with a caring adult at home, which may be an aunt, a sibling over the age of 18, even a close family friend. I have even help facilitate a parent discussion if the student is willing, but needs support to do so. But more than anything, I am happy they are willing to start any conversation with me at least. I'm happy they are willing to start with anyone.
    That's a good thing to say, I think it sounds better than tell your parent or DoS. I'm very lucky to be working here and the children trusting me so much to tell me their issues, but I wish our state wasn't so conservative that they can actually give a good sexual education that these deserve and maybe we wouldn't have this much problems of teenage mothers or anything else...

    Thank you all for the support and replies. I was a bit scared to ask this on here and thought I would be mauled for my decisions.
  4. by   OyWithThePoodles
    Quote from Amethya
    Thank you all for the support and replies. I was a bit scared to ask this on here and thought I would be mauled for my decisions.
    This is the school nurses forum. We don't maul. Another reason why I love you guys. Even if we disagree with one another we are very respectful.
  5. by   Amethya
    Quote from SullyRN
    This is the school nurses forum. We don't maul. Another reason why I love you guys. Even if we disagree with one another we are very respectful.
    I completely agree!
  6. by   Amethya
    End of our tale:

    I spoke with girl last week, she says she knows I did the right thing and it was for the best. She broke up with the boy and is currently going out with someone her age. Took care of her quickly and she left to class.

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