Munchausen on the increase? - page 4

It is my observation that many parents strongly advocate for their children to the point of excluding the rights of the rest of the students. I would love to hear from experienced school nurses if... Read More

  1. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from NutmeggeRN
    We now need a prescription from the MD and a very long form to be filled out for the "allergies"
    Isn't it amazing the lengths we go to to prevent potential lawsuits? We so need tort reform, that and insurance reform would negate any healthcare legislation.
  2. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from Jen-Elizabeth
    This is a bit extreme, but I'll bite and play devil's advocate for a minute. (Don't shoot me!)

    I work at a peanut free school. We don't have a cafeteria and students eat in homerooms, so we went fully peanut and tree nut free. Made in facility with foods are okay for lunch, but not class-wide distribution for celebrations, etc. I had a student eat a peanut butter protein bar next to a student with a severe peanut allergy. I ended up having to use an epi-pen on that student with the severe peanut allergy.

    In the real world, the student would have just left the room, but teacher didn't allow it at the time as it was simply protocol for lunch and even student wasn't aware of airborne nature of allergy that became apparent. Since then, student's allergy plan was updated to reflect needing to leave room in allergen in place. And reminder went home to parents/staff/students about school being peanut free and that if a student did bring in peanut butter, we can go that student a peanut-free lunch easily if needed.

    Now parent was great about this! Parent is one that realizes she can't protect her child from everything, nor can I police the entire school all the time. But at the same time, the school environment is not one students can usually freely room/leave if needed. It is a balance and man, it sucks to manage it sometimes. I have students sneaking Reese's in the bathroom, for example.

    Of course, there are extreme parents. Many more of them than I wish there were.
    This is the danger of saying peanut free, you can not control the actions of all students. You also can not control what a student eats before school. I feel for the children with that severe of a reaction, hope they can stay safe, but that is on them.
  3. by   WineRN
    Quote from kidzcare
    Then this falls on the teacher. If students are eating in the classroom, it is up to the teacher to be sure that students with allergies are not seated by students eating the allergen..
    And this takes up valuable classroom time too.
    I have a student where the teacher needs to assign her a lunch buddy to sit next to EVERY DAY, which means she has to check everyone's lunches every day for "spill-able dairy products" (student had an anaphlyaxis event from dairy contact in the past). This takes can take up to 15 mins sometimes because the little ones usually don't know what is packed in their lunches.

    And sometimes Subs don't get it or decide to do their own thing.
  4. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from kidzcare
    Then this falls on the teacher. If students are eating in the classroom, it is up to the teacher to be sure that students with allergies are not seated by students eating the allergen. I have also had to give an epi-pen to a child who was next to someone eating peanuts and I worry about that child's long term future in the real world. Going peanut/tree nut free gives a false sense of security to parents.
    Oh, I've discussed this with the student and parent. Student was unaware her allergy had progressed to that degree and we came up with a plan for it that can be applied to school and the real world. Student has Epi-pen on them at all time. Student is in HS and part of my job (or really how I see it) is to help student's figure out to realistically manage their health in the real world.

    I also can't expect teachers to be able to police everything either and I can't stop Reese's from being eaten in the bathroom. But I can do my best to provide a safe learning environment. So I try and we decided for now going peanut and tree free from our end is that, and that includes messaging home, providing peanut and tree nut free lunches, and ensuring all school sponsored events have food that is tree nut and peanut free. But we are building a cafeteria so who knows if it will evolve after it is done.

    But, back to this thread, I cannot tell you how many doctor's notes I have allowing students to use the bathroom whenever they want. And most students tell me that they don't have a medical reason, just asked doctor to write them the note and doctor did. (Which, yes, one can argue that students should be able to use the restroom, but some abuse it and use it as place to use their phones and text home, for example.)
  5. by   Flare
    We do not have a peanut free school for the reason of the unrealistic expectations that peanut products have to be policed. By making the blanket statement of no peanut products, you may have some success. But you will also stop being mindful of their potential presence. So when Jimmy has to stay with Grandma or Aunt Debbie for a few days and they are not aware of the policy and pack his lunch and a big peanut butter sandwich because that's what they pack themselves for lunch -well, now we have a problem when Jimmy is sitting in a peanut free school with an illegal sandwich. It will ultimately be taken away, Jimmy doesn't have a lunch and the local paper has a story with a nasty twist either way.

    We have peanut free zones. They serve us well.
  6. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from Flare
    We do not have a peanut free school for the reason of the unrealistic expectations that peanut products have to be policed. By making the blanket statement of no peanut products, you may have some success. But you will also stop being mindful of their potential presence. So when Jimmy has to stay with Grandma or Aunt Debbie for a few days and they are not aware of the policy and pack his lunch and a big peanut butter sandwich because that's what they pack themselves for lunch -well, now we have a problem when Jimmy is sitting in a peanut free school with an illegal sandwich. It will ultimately be taken away, Jimmy doesn't have a lunch and the local paper has a story with a nasty twist either way.

    We have peanut free zones. They serve us well.
    I wish, but like I said, we have no cafeteria and lunch is eaten everywhere. No where is a safe zone, so we try. I do hope I can convince a revisit of it once our cafeteria is complete.

    (And we provide lunch to any student that needs it; so no student would ever go without.)

    But also, can't fully police, so instead I work 1:1 with students with severe allergies to help them be mindful, which is the real success, I think.

    But when a parent doesn't want to let them be independent, that can be also be the real issue. Then head against a wall.
  7. by   NutmeggeRN
    And today I hear of students calling my VERY anaphylactic student "peanut boy/girl" and saying REALLY unkind things. I am so angry.
  8. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from NutmeggeRN
    And today I hear of students calling my VERY anaphylactic student "peanut boy/girl" and saying REALLY unkind things. I am so angry.
    Uncool, thankfully we addressed that before school started. Not the student's fault.
  9. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from NutmeggeRN
    And today I hear of students calling my VERY anaphylactic student "peanut boy/girl" and saying REALLY unkind things. I am so angry.
    Ugh. Kids can be jerks.
  10. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    Uncool, thankfully we addressed that before school started. Not the student's fault.
    It already has been here as well. Ugh. Kids can be so mean some times.
  11. by   OyWithThePoodles
    After talking with my kids pedi I realized that doctors will likely do just about anything the parent wants (writing orders, doctors notes for unnecessary visits) so they will stay at their practice. He said that he had to stop providing insurance to his employees because he could no longer afford it. Keeping patients, especially private insurance vs. medicaid is what keeps his business open and if he refuses to write an order, the parent will likely find another doctor that does.

    He does draw the line at SSI forms, he will NOT fill any out for things he feels is unnecessary, I found that out when I worked for him. Parents would call requesting forms and he would refuse.
  12. by   janetpa
    I had a parent who stated that without a doubt her son would die if he even touches a peanut. No doctors note--no epipen--and she packed him peanut bar and peanut butter sandwiches.
  13. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from janetpa
    I had a parent who stated that without a doubt her son would die if he even touches a peanut. No doctors note--no epipen--and she packed him peanut bar and peanut butter sandwiches.



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