Should rural nursing be a specialty? - page 2

Nurses in rural areas are confronted with very different hospital and clinic cultures than urban nurses. Nurses in rural areas have less resources available to them, less educational opportunities,... Read More

  1. Visit  elkpark} profile page
    1
    Quote from Multicollinearity
    As a lifelong urban resident transplanted to a rural area, I definately see significant differences. However, I am careful to limit my comments to the specific rural area I just left because this is only what I know. I see significant problems with men dominating women, domestic violence, child abuse, drug and alcohol abuse, obesity, and unhealthly lifestyles. I see more racism than I saw in urban culture.
    I have moved back and forth between rural and urban communities several times now during my few decades of nursing practice, and my observation has been that the problems you describe are significant problems in any community. Perhaps the racism is more overt in rural settings, but I've seen plenty of that, too, in urban settings. I would say that the biggest difference I've encountered in this regard is that it's easier to keep things (like domestic abuse and substance abuse) secret in a less personal, urban setting -- in small, rural communities, everyone knows everyone else's business, whether they want to or not.


    Quote from msn10
    I would be curious to ask why you feel this way. I don't have an opinion one way or another, I just see our university getting a lot of grants from them. I have not participated in one of those projects, however. Is there some specific suggestions you are referring to?
    They give out a lot of grant money, and I have no problem with that -- I just wish they'd stick to giving out money and stay away from telling the nursing community how nursing ought to be practiced. The last time they did a big study on addressing the nursing "shortage" and how to alleviate it (this was quite a few years ago, now), their final recommendations included a proposal to eliminate nursing licensure altogether and let each individual hospital (and other healthcare employers) train and license its own "nurses" and decide what professional standards it, individually, found necessary/appropriate. Since then, I've not had a lot of interest in what the RWJF thinks would benefit nursing and healthcare.
    Altra likes this.
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  3. Visit  ruralgirl08} profile page
    0
    I was a new grad in a rural hospital, let me tell you, its much easier being a new grad in a larger center. I was able to take courses needed for the position, on my own time through the internet, ect. But I found the lack of support and "preceptorship" a big issue. I was thrown into things like, patient transport with no expereince or required supplies in case of an emergency. I really liked the diversity, but I needed more support to grow confidence as a nurse.
    I think keeping up to the current standard can be an issue, when you don't see the same things everyday. It would have been helpful to rotate us through a larger center occasionally, or have a more structured orientation, or refresher classes to stay current.
  4. Visit  msn10} profile page
    0
    I think keeping up to the current standard can be an issue, when you don't see the same things everyday. It would have been helpful to rotate us through a larger center occasionally, or have a more structured orientation, or refresher classes to stay current.
    Thanks rural girl! I am trying to do something that will do just what you described.
  5. Visit  HouTx} profile page
    1
    The vast majority of our state is rural and the Texas Rural Health Association http://www.trha.org/ has been very influential in health policy decisions for decades. Unless you travel only by air, most of us are 'rural Texans' for at least some times of our lives, even if it's only during trip from Houston to San Antonio. Rural Nursing has already been recognized as a special focus in Texas. Texas Tech University School of Nursing has had an MSN with this focus for some time now http://www.depts.ttu.edu/officialpub...SC_Nursing.php.

    Based on my own experiences as an educator supporting those facilities, there is a huge difference between working as "The RN" in a rural facility and other settings, even in a small community hospital. ENA has already documented that there are some types of severe trauma that are exclusiverly associated with farming/rural hospitals. It takes a special kind of nurse moxie to function as the ER-OB-OR-MedSurg-Supervisor-and-frequently-ambulance-dispatcher & that's their normal job. Top it off with the fact that your job nearly always carries the emotional toll of taking care of people you know very well.... Kudos to those who do it.
    Schatzi RN CEN likes this.
  6. Visit  msn10} profile page
    0
    The vast majority of our state is rural and the Texas Rural Health Association http://www.trha.org/ has been very influential in health policy decisions for decades. Unless you travel only by air, most of us are 'rural Texans' for at least some times of our lives, even if it's only during trip from Houston to San Antonio. Rural Nursing has already been recognized as a special focus in Texas. Texas Tech University School of Nursing has had an MSN with this focus for some time now http://www.depts.ttu.edu/officialpub...SC_Nursing.php.
    [quote=HouTx;5420151]

    Thank you for your information!!! I am working with 3 states that are founding rural orgs for new RN's. I am trying to read as much info as possible.
  7. Visit  psfahs} profile page
    1
    jumping into the middle of this converstion. I think there is a place for a rural nursing speciality. I teach rural nursing and have had lots of rural nursing experience. I think the rural nurse has to be the "Consumate Generalist" - well versed in many areas - cross trained much more than someone in a more urban facility and one of the biggest differences in my opinion is that the rural nurse has to be able to manage multiple roles and emergent situations often without a lot of support within the system.
    Multicollinearity likes this.
  8. Visit  Schatzi RN CEN} profile page
    0
    I am a nurse manager in a CAH. I would say that the nature of nursing practice in small rural hospitals would benefit more from nurse residency programs than an actual rural education track. A problem I face with new grads is that although they come to us with a very broad base of theoretical knowledge, they lack practice. In a setting where the usual staff, especially on nights consists of 1-2 licensed nurses and 1-2 CNAs the licensed nurse may be required to cover ER, ICU and a few skilled patients in the same night. It takes a long time to obtain the broad knowledge needed for such a diverse group of practice settings.
    We may not see a code for a couple of months, and then have several in a row, making it very hard to allow a new nurse to become proficient in all areas that she may encounter.
    Last edit by Schatzi RN CEN on Aug 21, '11 : Reason: Typo
  9. Visit  dfurbee} profile page
    0
    I think that rural nursing should be a specialty


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