RN-BSN and not working? | allnurses

RN-BSN and not working?

  1. 0 I am currently finishing up my 4th semester in an ADN program and plan to begin a 1-year online RN-BSN program beginning in June. I am VERY interested in nurse residency programs in my area, but the only ones within reason require a bachelor's and LESS THAN 10-12 mos. experience as a working nurse. for me, that would mean not working at all during the BSN program. I am worried that not working during that time will cause me to lose my med admin. and other nursing skills. Has anyone else encountered this dilemma or have an opinion on whether i should or should not go for the nurse residency if not working is the sacrifice? I still live with my parents and they would be supportive of any option.
    Thanks!
  2. Visit  jhunting profile page

    About jhunting

    From 'Massachusetts'; Joined Sep '10; Posts: 38; Likes: 9.

    20 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  kyboyrn profile page
    0
    I don't think that you would lose your skills that quickly, but I do think that's a little ridiculous. I'd probably just try to find a part time job somewhere, even if it wasn't my ideal job, to make some money and then go for the job I really wanted once I finished with my BSN. Or if you are really dead set on doing one of those residency programs, work somewhere and quit after 6 to 8 months so you don't go over the requirements for the residency programs. I'm not too familiar with nurse residency programs, so elaborate on why you are so interested, and exactly what a nurse residency program entails. I'm sorry I don't know more about them. I graduated nursing school back in 2005 (I'm an NP now) so I'm sure things have changed. I also live in a rural area, so our programs are limited, and many nurses don't even have BSNs, so I'm interested in learning more about nurse residency programs.
  4. Visit  Mrs. Sparkle Pants profile page
    0
    Don't start working right away. Maybe wait 3 months or so, then when you graduate you will only have 9 months experience.
  5. Visit  klone profile page
    2
    Start looking for employment now. If all the posts here are any indication, it will probably take you at least 3-6 months to find a job anyway.
    cocoa_puff and shhhh like this.
  6. Visit  BrookeeLou_RN profile page
    0
    jhunting,
    May I ask what RN-BSN online program will only take one year?
    I agree start looking now and by the time you find what fits your life you will me under the time constraint.
  7. Visit  jhunting profile page
    1
    Thanks, everyone. Adding in the The time it takes to find a job as a new grad is a good point. UMass Amherst is the BSN program you go straight through taking classes in the summer, fall, winter, and spring. My ultimate goal is to become a CRNA (requiring at least 1 year in intensive care) and the programs at MassGen and Darthmouth-Hitchcock put you in an ICU for a year. I would really like the intensive training and I feel it would put me in a good position to get an ICU position for a year or two before I begin a CRNA program.
    ticklemenita likes this.
  8. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    1
    You have to review, of course, but you don't lose those skills. I completed a 4 year BSN program last year and started working at the beginning of Jan, six months later. When I was in my program, from our 3rd to the 4th year, we all practiced very few hard skills, because it was community based in 3rd year. Also remember that nursing is much more than all the "hard" skills.
    Nurse_Diane likes this.
  9. Visit  ticklemenita profile page
    1
    I am someone who did an ADN program. I am very interested in completing an RN-MSN program. I found out the hard way that most schools who have an RN-MSN or RN-BSN program need you to be an RN with experience. I ended up finding a job as a Graduate Nurse Resident almost immediately after graduating and I do not regret doing so. Many of the people who started with me say it took them anywhere from 6-18 months to find a job and some of their and my classmates don't even have a job. Another thing to consider is the job may offer tuition reimbursement, and a bonus for passing nclex. Keep in mind that if you do find a school that will take you as an RN-BSN with out passing nclex or experience the pay scale difference is only in most cases $1 more per hour if that. I think it is well worth it to go ahead and work. Best of Luck!

    Quote from jhunting
    I am currently finishing up my 4th semester in an ADN program and plan to begin a 1-year online RN-BSN program beginning in June. I am VERY interested in nurse residency programs in my area, but the only ones within reason require a bachelor's and LESS THAN 10-12 mos. experience as a working nurse. for me, that would mean not working at all during the BSN program. I am worried that not working during that time will cause me to lose my med admin. and other nursing skills. Has anyone else encountered this dilemma or have an opinion on whether i should or should not go for the nurse residency if not working is the sacrifice? I still live with my parents and they would be supportive of any option.
    Thanks!
    Faeriewand likes this.
  10. Visit  ScottE profile page
    0
    You are unlikely to lose any skills going straight from an ADN program into a BSN completion program. Most if not all RN-BSN programs have a clinical component of some kind.
  11. Visit  PAERRN20 profile page
    0
    I would encourage you to at least work part time while getting your BSN. I did, and I am very very glad that I did so.
  12. Visit  ObtundedRN profile page
    0
    Nurse residency programs are great. The reason why they want you to have less than 10-12 months exp. is because it is only meant for new grads. You could either do a residency program now or after you finish your BSN, if you don't work through your BSN. OR you could get a job, work through your BSN, and then hopefully transfer to the ICU. I know several people that started working in a new grad residency program and started their RN-BSN (mostly online) at the same time. That's always an option too. Most RN-BSN programs don't have a clinical requirement if you are currently working as an RN.
  13. Visit  klone profile page
    1
    Quote from ScottE
    Most if not all RN-BSN programs have a clinical component of some kind.
    No, I don't think so. It's assumed that the clinical component has already been completed in the RN program. RN-BSN focuses on advanced assessment, leadership, theory, etc.
    Nurse_Diane likes this.
  14. Visit  April, RN profile page
    1
    Quote from jhunting
    Thanks, everyone. Adding in the The time it takes to find a job as a new grad is a good point. UMass Amherst is the BSN program you go straight through taking classes in the summer, fall, winter, and spring. My ultimate goal is to become a CRNA (requiring at least 1 year in intensive care) and the programs at MassGen and Darthmouth-Hitchcock put you in an ICU for a year. I would really like the intensive training and I feel it would put me in a good position to get an ICU position for a year or two before I begin a CRNA program.
    I'm not familiar with Dartmouth-Hitchcock but am familiar with Mass General. Their ICU residency is new this year to staff a new ICU they are opening. Who knows if they will offer the program again next year? The new grad ICU program that was traditionally offered in previous years is very selective with very few. They even put the program on hold in recent years due to budget constraints. With the new grad employment situation being as bad as it is in Massachusetts right now, I wouldn't recommend holding out on applying in hopes of landing a position next year in a program with an uncertain future. Apply to every and any job when you graduate with your ADN. Don't miss out on any opportunity! If you find yourself still looking next winter when it comes time to apply for these new grad programs again, then go for it then!
    BrookeeLou_RN likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Visit Our Sponsors
Top
close
close