higher pay for BSN grads? - page 5

Quick poll here... Does your hospital pay BSN nurses more? If yes, how much? If no, what are your thoughts on this? On a side note: Does Magnet status tie into BSN nurses?... Read More

  1. by   RainDreamer
    Quote from swanganz
    Hi everyone. Forgive me if this post is a duplicate. I am still learning my way around here! i was just curious as to what nurses salaries are across the nation, mainly interested in hospital staff RNs. I am in Ohio and new grads make around 24/hr with and addt'l $1/hr for nights (at least where I work) Our tuition reimbursement tops out at 1,500 for full time. It just always seems that the national average nursing salary is over inflated. I am also curious because me and my family are hopefully leaving Ohio for a variety of reasons...weather...schools...and was wondering what to expect in other states. I have been an RN for 3+ years and have spent all of them in a MICU. Any info would be appreciated. Also just interesting to see how fellow nurses are doing "salary wise" across the US. Thanks!
    The salary range from state to state is huge, even from hospital to hospital within the same state. The best thing to do is to go to www.salary.com, chose whichever states you're interested in, your specific position/job title and it'll give a good idea of the salary range. Good luck to you!
  2. by   RN34TX
    Quote from lee1
    HMM, just wonder if they discriminate against those diploma or ADN nurses with tons of certified critical care or specialty care experience who may apply for jobs in their hospitals. What a waste of talent if they do.
    That post you are referring to sounds similar to the hiring practices at one Houston hospital I applied at as a new grad ADN RN.

    Their big downtown campus only hired BSN's for new grad positions, but they still hired experienced ADN and diploma RN's.

    After turning me down because I only had my ADN as a new grad RN, they forwarded my application to two of their smaller community hospital affiliates in the suburbs who did not have a BSN only policy in place with respect to hiring new grads.

    I'm not sure why only one hospital in the chain had this policy while all of the others did not.
  3. by   mart18642
    Quote from aph401
    i'm currently a nursing student, but the hospitals affiliated with our university (i'm in BSN program) pay .25/hr more for having a a BSN. so, if you figure that up, you make about $525 more a year than your co-workers with an ADN, which in 5 years won't even cover the cost of the tuition of the extra education you got. is that fair? absolutely not. but, unfortunately, you learn really quickly that life isn't fair.
    Here pays depends...the one I work pays .50 than the 2 years-RNdegree
  4. by   travel920
    This sounds like the argument over the difference between an MD and a DO

    d
  5. by   vamedic4
    Originally Posted by aph401
    i'm currently a nursing student, but the hospitals affiliated with our university (i'm in BSN program) pay .25/hr more for having a a BSN. so, if you figure that up, you make about $525 more a year than your co-workers with an ADN, which in 5 years won't even cover the cost of the tuition of the extra education you got. is that fair? absolutely not. but, unfortunately, you learn really quickly that life isn't fair.

    Again, you're soooo missing the point. You may eventually be rewarded for the education you received in the form of a Bachelor's Degree...but as a new grad...RN...your job is NO DIFFERENT than someone with only an Associate's Degree. Don't cry because you "feel cheated" that you had to spend "X" amount for your education...and that what little you may make "more" doesn't even make up for your more advanced degree. It was, after all, your decision to get a BSN in the first place. I suspect that many people choose the ADN route because it's A. More common B. Has a quicker entry into nursing. If I think of a C, I'll let you know.

    Just count yourself lucky that you're part of a BSN program, and that opportunities will be plentiful for you once you are a nurse.


    vamedic4
    He's asleep! Time to study.
  6. by   travel920
    Here is an interesting document:

    ftp://www.bne.state.tx.us/del-comp.pdf

    The Nursing Licensing Board of the State of Texas differentiates between LVN, RN and BSN in terms of education requirements. The official title of this particular document is:

    "Differented Entry Level Competencies of Graduates of Texas Nursing Programs."

    Someone who is interested in the differences between ADN and BSN might find the document interesting. I don't know enough yet to draw conclusions. I have no idea if other states are the same as Texas. I choose a BSN because I already had 40 plus hours of undergraduate credits and a BSN program was a lot closer to where I live than an ADN program.

    d
  7. by   kellerpatty
    Quote from romie
    appalling
    Ha Ha! Appalling? All I know is that I take my cheap little ADN degree to my unit every night and work my butt off. Appalling? Appalling is people's attitudes about something so trivial when we got people hurting and possibly dying. Come on, does it really matter whether somebody can afford to pay a lot more money than I could for an education. It's the same old "have" and "have-not" class issue that has been around since time immemorial. I made straight A's, passed with highest honors, and will now gladly let my employer pay for my BSN, which I will work equally hard for. Appalling is the people who don't work in the trenches and who have forgotten what skills are really required, making the rules and setting the tone for these ugly BSN vs. ADN arguments (that seem to pop up at the drop of a hat)...that's appalling. My first job is in a Level I BICU and guess what...even with my "limited" education...I can actually do my job. Oh, yeah, BSN's make 50 cents more an hour, which over a shift buys a really good cup of coffee! Like someone once asked years ago..."Can't we all just get along?"
  8. by   FLAgal14
    Quote from travel920
    This sounds like the argument over the difference between an MD and a DO

    d
    You are so right... and that argument has been beaten to death too (go to SDN - there is pretty much a MD vs. DO thread everyday). It seems like every career in healthcare has a us vs. them mentality (BSN vs. ADN, MD vs. DO, NP vs. PA).
  9. by   mart18642
    Quote from kellerpatty
    Ha Ha! Appalling? All I know is that I take my cheap little ADN degree to my unit every night and work my butt off. Appalling? Appalling is people's attitudes about something so trivial when we got people hurting and possibly dying. Come on, does it really matter whether somebody can afford to pay a lot more money than I could for an education. It's the same old "have" and "have-not" class issue that has been around since time immemorial. I made straight A's, passed with highest honors, and will now gladly let my employer pay for my BSN, which I will work equally hard for. Appalling is the people who don't work in the trenches and who have forgotten what skills are really required, making the rules and setting the tone for these ugly BSN vs. ADN arguments (that seem to pop up at the drop of a hat)...that's appalling. My first job is in a Level I BICU and guess what...even with my "limited" education...I can actually do my job. Oh, yeah, BSN's make 50 cents more an hour, which over a shift buys a really good cup of coffee! Like someone once asked years ago..."Can't we all just get along?"



    A BSN degree is not a way to get money or more clinical skills;is a way to enhance and further up the career , and believe me is pretty rewarding.
    I was a 2 year RN and worked for many years as such, then one day I realized that it was not enought, I got my BSN ( and yes I only got .50 cent more.). Now Im going to be a Nurse Practitioner and I could not have done it without my BSN. You can get skills all day long as a RN or LPN, but in order to further up your education and see what is out there, you have to become a BSN first and then is not telling what could happened next.....
    Just my 2
  10. by   user9876
    Quote from vamedic4
    Originally Posted by aph401
    i'm currently a nursing student, but the hospitals affiliated with our university (i'm in BSN program) pay .25/hr more for having a a BSN. so, if you figure that up, you make about $525 more a year than your co-workers with an ADN, which in 5 years won't even cover the cost of the tuition of the extra education you got. is that fair? absolutely not. but, unfortunately, you learn really quickly that life isn't fair.

    -----

    Again, you're soooo missing the point. You may eventually be rewarded for the education you received in the form of a Bachelor's Degree...but as a new grad...RN...your job is NO DIFFERENT than someone with only an Associate's Degree. Don't cry because you "feel cheated" that you had to spend "X" amount for your education...and that what little you may make "more" doesn't even make up for your more advanced degree. It was, after all, your decision to get a BSN in the first place. I suspect that many people choose the ADN route because it's A. More common B. Has a quicker entry into nursing. If I think of a C, I'll let you know.

    Just count yourself lucky that you're part of a BSN program, and that opportunities will be plentiful for you once you are a nurse.


    vamedic4
    He's asleep! Time to study.

    i'm sooo missing the point?? EVERY other field pays their workers with bachelors degrees more than those with an associates degrees, so maybe NURSING is missing the point? guess what, whether anyone with an associates degree wants to admit it or not, bachelors programs at universities are more difficult, plain and simple. you should be rewarded for that in a higher salary - you took the longer, more difficult route to nursing and got your BSN when you could've just gone to the local community college to have it easier and faster, like most nurses do. why should you not get paid more? as with any degree, the harder the schooling, the more money you make. why do doctors, pscyhologists, etc make so much money? they picked careers with extensive, difficult schooling. my father is a engineer and works with many designers who complain that they do the same job, WHY shouldn't they get paid the same? they have to know ALL of the same things, yet they don't make as much money. why wouldn't nursing reward more education with higher salary?
    Last edit by user9876 on Sep 20, '06
  11. by   kellerpatty
    Quote from aph401
    i'm sooo missing the point?? EVERY other field pays their workers with bachelors degrees more than those with an associates degrees, so maybe NURSING is missing the point? guess what, whether anyone with an associates degree wants to admit it or not, bachelors programs at universities are more difficult, plain and simple. you should be rewarded for that in a higher salary - you took the longer, more difficult route to nursing and got your BSN when you could've just gone to the local community college to have it easier and faster, like most nurses do. why should you not get paid more? as with any degree, the harder the schooling, the more money you make. why do doctors, pscyhologists, etc make so much money? they picked careers with extensive, difficult schooling. my father is a engineer and works with many designers who complain that they do the same job, WHY shouldn't they get paid the same? they have to know ALL of the same things, yet they don't make as much money. why wouldn't nursing reward more education with higher salary?

    The POINT is that when a new nurse takes the NCLEX (yes, the same exam that every new nurse takes to become a RN) and gets their first job, they are ALL doing the SAME job. I can't think of any BSN nurses that I know who have been saddled with more expectations or responsibilities straight out of school than any other new nurse.

    It is not until the BSN (or ADN student, for that matter) student advances themselves in the workplace, that they should be compensated for their performance and responsibilities on that NEW advanced position for which they are qualified...and not before.

    Nurses should be focusing on the clinical and managerial skills gained from proven performance, experience and hard work, and not solely on the letters they have behind their name. I don't understand why having a BSN behind one's name suddenly makes that person more knowledgeable and qualified directly from nursing school (notice the "directly from school" part). I could go on and on about my experiences with BSN students and new nurses, but that's like beating a dead horse (and for every BSN student there would be an ADN student doing or not doing the same thing).

    Even a doctor, lawyer, or say, an engineer, doesn't start out at the top. If that highly-educated doctor or lawyer doesn't perform appropriately in their responsibilities they are not going to go far with that higher education...be it doctor, lawyer, nurse, or whoever.

    I must take exception to the premise that a BSN degree is more difficult...becoming and being a nurse is diffucult no matter where you study.

    The difference, in my opinion, between those with ADNs and those with BSNs is money, pure and simple. Of course, everyone would love to have an advanced degree, wouldn't they? But there are those who simply can't afford it...parents can't pay, middle class people who can't qualify for grants, and those who would prefer not to spend the beginning of their careers in deep debt when they know their employer will provide them with tuition reimbursement for further education. Why aren't the issues of enhanced subsidies and grants with equal access to further education for nursing students discussed in these US vs. THEM debates

    Again, I believe that we have a perfect example of the so-called HAVES and HAVE NOTS (for whatever reason)...with the HAVES once again thinking the HAVE NOTS are somehow inferior. Performance is performance, both in technical and managerial situations. Is a BSN with a C average still superior to an ADN with an A average.

    People seem to be implying, here, that the quality of nurses should be based solely on the school they went to and their so-called level of education and not the quality of their commitment to patients and the prevention and treatment of illnesses in all settings...managerial or technical.

    Why can't we stop this superiority complex syndrome on all sides? I'd like to know how many of us became nurses JUST for the money...

    Okay, okay...I'll get off my soapbox now, it's time for work anyway!
    Last edit by kellerpatty on Sep 20, '06
  12. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from RANTS
    Your hospital doesn't pay more for a BSN, but they encourage you to get it?
    What??
    Without any additional compensation involved, how exactly do they go about "encouraging" your staff RN's to get their BSN?
    .
    I think corporations say it just to sound good. When I was working as a medical assistant they always said that they encouraged continued education. They reimbursed me when I took my nutrition class. Yet, it is a very 9 to 5 job so when I first started my Pre-reqs I essentially had to quit because they would not work with my schedule. The last semester I went back to work because I only had two classes left so I could work part time; both of my classes were in the morning and only twice a week. Of course they did not pay me back because I was only working part time...took all my benefits away etc ect...My friend that works there was signed up for an EMT class that was going to be after work, then they switched doctors on her with one that worked late and they made her drop her class...they like to say they want you to further yourself but not at their inconvenience and it is not at all at your convince when it is at theirs. I am not working right now that I am in the BSN program. I am in school four days a week and all my labs are 5+ hours, after studying I hardly have time for hubby, let alone a job that does not appreciate me. I am pretty sure I am going to just take it easy on winter break and not work at all unlike I originally planned. My pay checks are small enough for to justify sitting on my butt for a month (ok not really I will have a lot of stuff to to do)

    Oh yeah, when I was first higherd I only had a certificate of completion in medical assisting from the JC. After I finished my nursing pre-reqs I had an AS degree and they did not pay me a cent more.
    Last edit by HeartsOpenWide on Sep 22, '06
  13. by   OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    Quote from kellerpatty
    The POINT is that when a new nurse takes the NCLEX (yes, the same exam that every new nurse takes to become a RN) and gets their first job, they are ALL doing the SAME job. I can't think of any BSN nurses that I know who have been saddled with more expectations or responsibilities straight out of school than any other new nurse.
    ........
    I doubt anyone cares since I already posted this, but.......

    I've witnessed in another profession equally as important as nursing that people are rewarded for additional education. My husband transitioned from an engineer to a teacher. He is a brand new teacher with no teaching experience. All teacher candidates take an exam called the Praxis I. All Math candidates take THE SAME exam called the Praxis II in order to receive certification. Most school districts have pay scales for all employees, including those with zero experience. They have Bachelor's only, Bacherlor's 150, Master's only, Master's +15, and on and on up to PhD. My husband ranks as Bach 150, which earned him more money from the start. He has no additional responsibilities as a teacher.

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