Frustrated in BSN program - page 4

by JZ_RN

12,636 Views | 128 Comments

So I am tired of getting treated like an ignorant, useless nurse because I only have an ADN and denied employment everywhere because I'm not a BSN. I get into a BSN program and start taking EXPENSIVE classes, on my own dime, and... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from MunoRN
    Where I came up with this:

    Pathophysiology is not part of an ASN to BSN program, why? Because it's an integral part of any ASN or BSN curriculum, ASN students do not lack pathophysiology knowledge any more than a BSN does. It's exactly this sort of ignorance regarding ASN curriculum that leads to an unfounded bias towards ASN nurses among BSN prepared Nurses.
    The only "bias" I see that the OP is facing is in trying to get a job at a hospital. If you'll go back to the original topic (I know, it's difficult) then you'll see she said that she was treated as a "useless nurse" or something of that sort. Then, I...finding it hard to believe that co-workers or anyone else would do that since it typically only happens on this forum...asked who is treating her that way. She responded that the HOSPITALS won't consider her for an interview. You want to make everything a personal issue when one doesn't exist.
    JZ_RN likes this.
  2. 0
    I never wanted to go back after my RN degree. But hubby mentioned it one day and I thought what the heck, why not? I was accepted and all set to begin a BSN program next spring. I was almost 2 months into taking statistics and after much annoyance from that useless crap, I dropped out. NOT because of that class but because I busted my butt for 3 years to become an RN, took much time away from my family, spent countless hours reading, studying, doing online quizzes and tests. Why do it all again for another title? It's not worth it to me. I feel 100% confident with my decision and have such a weight lifted since I quit a month ago. Only you know what's best for you and your situation. Good luck!
  3. 0
    Quote from Miiki
    Well, a diploma is minimal...
    a diploma and a degree are two different things
  4. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    Obviously they DO want to see those requirements fulfilled because they do require an ADN graduate to also have a bachelor's degree. What's the difference in a bachelor's degree in social work and a bachelor's degree in nursing? Well, it would be those 45 credits that you claim no one cares about, yet they still require to even consider an applicant.

    Anyway, if I wanted to debate ADN vs BSN then I'd go back to that thread. You're obsessed with the topic to the point that you refute all logic and bypass unrelated questions.
    No those can be the same 45 credits of elective with either degree. Again, are you under the impression that ADN programs do not teach pathophysiology?
  5. 2
    Quote from MunoRN
    An ASN consists of about 45 credits of pre-reqs and 2 years of Nursing program. A BSN consists of 45 credits of pre-reqs, 2 years of Nursing program, and about 45 credits of electives. For me, those 45 credits of electives (the only substantial difference between an ASN and BSN) consisted mainly of geography, PE (sailing, running) and classical lit. I really don't think that "boatload" of extra college credits which mainly involved reading Homer and sailing made any measurable difference in my Nursing skills. If UW saw any significant difference in my Nursing education and that of a ADN then they'd probably want to see those requirements fulfilled, but as it turns out, they don't.
    Oh...my...G.E.D! (joke)

    You said: "I really don't think that "boatload" of extra college credits which mainly involved reading Homer and sailing made any measurable difference in my Nursing skills. If UW saw any significant difference in my Nursing education and that of a ADN then they'd probably want to see those requirements fulfilled, but as it turns out, they don't."

    So, yes, the "electives" in a social work degree and BSN can be the same, but those electives that you say "UW doesn't want to see fulfilled" ARE required to apply to the MSN program! The ONLY difference between a person with an ADN and a person with an ADN and a bachelor's in social work are those "45 useless credits," so how can you say they don't care about those?

    That's not even a matter of opinion. It's just a simple fact.


    I think that ADN graduates learn what their program offers and requires. Since most programs do NOT offer nor require a class devoted to pathophysiology, I think ANYONE who hasn't taken a class on pathophysiology can learn something from it. I also think a master chef can learn something by taking a cooking class.

    What's with this creepy obsession? Did someone force you to get a BSN?

    In the end, it doesn't matter if hospitals are hiring BSN over ADN graduates for the simple fact that they pre-ordered tons of name badges that say "BSN" and want to use them up. The fact still remains that hospitals prefer (if not have an unspoken/unpublished requirement) for BSN grads. So, in the end, it doesn't matter what anyone's thoughts/feelings/theories or whatever else are....because anyone can come here and chat about those all day long when they take a break from applying for jobs that nobody will give them an interview for.
    Last edit by Ntheboat2 on Nov 24, '12
    Anoetos and wooh like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from f8dagrate
    a diploma and a degree are two different things
    They were referring to a diploma nursing program. You can google it. They are almost unheard of now, but there are still RNs who did that type of program, and programs that still exist.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from f8dagrate

    a diploma and a degree are two different things
    Actually, I was referring to a diploma RN program. They issue a diploma at graduation instead of a ASN or a BSN. There is one in my city. It requires a semester's worth of prereqs and takes a little less than two years to complete. It is the only one of its kind left in my state.

    It used to be the standard (hospital based nursing programs), but was fazed out for ASN programs.

    My school started as a sanitarium that issued diplomas in 1923. Started offering ASNs in 1989. And just recently changed to BSNs.
    Last edit by Miiki SN on Nov 24, '12
    wooh likes this.
  8. 1
    Wow, while I am sure the Job Climate and Salary is different here in the Southeastern US, you would be hard pressed to find a hospital unit with more than one BSN/MSN. Of my first 5 years, I spent the majority of my time as Charge Nurse, then when I obtained my BSN two years later, My boss still was an ADN.

    Now that I have my MSN FNP, I still work in Acute Care (when pulled from ED working contract as a Staff Nurse) to units where the Unit Manager, Charge Nurse, and most colleagues are ADN-RNs or LPN-LVNs. It's just a non-issue here. The BSN is actually thought of as a bridge to MSN as the pay, as you mentioned, is rarely affected(when it is usually $0.50/hr+).

    I can speak for travel experience in NC, SC, GA, FL, TN, TX, AL, LA, KY, MS, OK, VA, and D.C.

    When I worked NY, FL, and CA I never got pulled to floor, but there were ample ADNs in Triage, Trauma, ED, and Fast Tracks. Management here did usually have advanced degrees, and found it funny I "staff nursed" with mine- as they obtained their's to enter management and administrative positions.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  9. 2
    Quote from BostonTerrierLoverRN
    Wow, while I am sure the Job Climate and Salary is different here in the Southeastern US, you would be hard pressed to find a hospital unit with more than one BSN/MSN.
    Outside the cities, but at least in Atlanta, there's a rising push for BSN.

    (Of course, in the southeast, there's not much respect for higher education anywhere. Why get book learnin' when you can get yourself a tv gig on Honey Boo Boo?)
    Anoetos and BostonTerrierLoverRN like this.
  10. 0
    I am a Diploma nurse working in the hospital where I went to school. I have been there 29 years. I know if I want to further my career I will have to go back to school at some point. I have been lucky enough to be "grandfathered" in by our union but I know the frustration by new nurses trying to get jobs. The only difference a BSN gets you is more research education not bedside education. I have watched new nurses with BSN degree's almost drown when thrown to the wolves on very busy nursing floors. Pretty soon all hospitals will only hire nurses with BSN degrees. I don't agree with this but that is the way things are going. If your feeling overwhelmed maybe taking a break then going back may be an option. As a Diploma nurse I had the same education that a ADN did I just don't have the title, and we did get a lot more clinical experience.


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