Diploma vs Associates degree school? - page 2

by gabriellegoss

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What is the difference between diploma schools and getting your associates degree? Are there Any advantages to either?... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Seas
    Getting associates is a better idea in the long run. First, it is a degree after all that required some other basic classes. Also, it counts much more if you want to go up to higher degrees. With only diploma, you may have to start over again for bachelor's degree.
    That may not be true depending on the BSN program you choose. I am doing a completion with a major university and they accepted college credits that were almost 30 years old.

    There are advantages and disadvantages to both.
  2. 0
    Quote from Seas
    Getting associates is a better idea in the long run. First, it is a degree after all that required some other basic classes. Also, it counts much more if you want to go up to higher degrees. With only diploma, you may have to start over again for bachelor's degree.
    This simply is not true.

    You and look up and down the faculty and staff list of major/top hospitals and universities and find scores of nurses ranging from staff, education, administration, management and so forth that started as diploma graduates but now have an entire alphabet of letters behind their name.

    There are many, many RN to MSN programs that take both diploma and ADN grads with pretty much the same requirements. RN-MSN Entry | Master of Science in Nursing | Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

    While not all diploma programs would provide the necessary college credits, neither do all ADN schools. Furthermore there is nothing stopping a diploma grad from taking the required courses on her own either pre or post grad.

    As for an AAS/ADN being a "degree", I don't know about that. Both are considered "technical" degrees though the latter slightly better (but just), and in the real world of employment and academics are seen as *some* college preparation being slightly (again but just) better than a diploma. When speaking with or in the world of academics or even some employers *college degree* equals four year or above.
  3. 1
    I had my BS (psych) before getting my diploma in nursing. I believe that diplomas are more specific to nursing and offers more clinical experience. The good thing about getting a Associates is that you take more classes that count towards your BSN (english, sociology, etc.) But if you already have a bachelor's degree, then I would go for a diploma school since it is more nursing specific and you will already have the prereq classes done....
    monkeybug likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from Seas
    Getting associates is a better idea in the long run. First, it is a degree after all that required some other basic classes. Also, it counts much more if you want to go up to higher degrees. With only diploma, you may have to start over again for bachelor's degree.
    Um...no. I am a diploma RN. When I went for BSN I was given the same credit for my RN as somebody who had an associates degree. My diploma did not count less that an associates degree.
  5. 0
    Quote from Seas

    More gen ed classes with diploma. So?
    Why didn't ADN degree not take more gen ed classes then?
    Some classes may not transfer with only diploma.
    Your school may be okay with that, but don't generalize. Some schools may not recognize your diploma and make you restart.

    So, ADN is always more advantageous than diploma.

    An ADN is not always more advantageous than a diploma. Where are you getting that from?
  6. 1
    Quote from megank5183
    I had my BS (psych) before getting my diploma in nursing. I believe that diplomas are more specific to nursing and offers more clinical experience. The good thing about getting a Associates is that you take more classes that count towards your BSN (english, sociology, etc.) But if you already have a bachelor's degree, then I would go for a diploma school since it is more nursing specific and you will already have the prereq classes done....
    Can agree with some but not all of your post, however much would depend upon where one lives.

    Here in NYC if not NYS many hospitals long stopped hiring diploma grads, indeed there is only one such program in the entire state. The remaining hospital and or former diploma nursing schools now all offer ADN degrees. Even the old Saint Vinny's schools in Staten Island, and Queens long converted over to associate degrees. Saint Vincent's School of Nursing in Manhattan simply closed.

    With the "BSN preferred" trend at least for new hires going full tilt in NYC at the moment, I would never suggest anyone seeking to attend a nursing school in this area consider one (New Jersey still has a few), it is just too great a risk of not being hired post grad.

    For some reason the one state that seems to love their diploma nurses is Philadelphia, well at least there are still a good number of such programs located in that state.
    Violach likes this.
  7. 2
    Well...that was as clear as mud! As you can see....there is no standard....something that has driven me CRAZY for YEARS!!!!!!!!!! This discussion will end no time soon.

    When I went to school at a "regular 4 year college" I was given a "degree" (not a technical degree) and you became a NP at the BSN level. My Associate degree is now at the Bachelors level with added "college curriculum" fluff...I mean college type courses.

    This single subject causes the most frequent arguments and "discussions" in the nursing profession....and probably one of our biggest failings. I feel that all three programs need to be combined...the clinical experience of the diploma, the collegiate respect of the BSN at the cost of the ADN... and I believe in fairies and unicorns.

    The moral of the story....do your homework. I know of a diploma program in Indiana that remains open and essentially hires only it's graduates. This program is well known in the area and other facilities consider it an equal participant in the local job market...however when they leave the market.....that nurse in this present climate will have an issue finding a position for many facilities are hiring an almost exclusive BSN grad. There are some ASN/ADN programs that are considered locally as supreme programs but may not carry the same weight when you leave that environment...for the new grad.

    REMEMBER NOT ALL PROGRAMS ARE CREATED EQUAL! and be sure to go to an accredited "nursing" program accredited by the nursing gurus like......NLN, NLAC and CCNE.

    Regardless of the entry level of education is has become clear that it is necessary for those entering the profession will have to get their BSN, or higher, degree to remain competitive in the job market and imperative if you are seeking career advancement...which was not so true of my generation.

    Some credits will transfer....depending on the school. Some schools will accept very few credits for they want the money all for themselves.......profits drive requirement more than that adequacy of the education received.

    Heres the deal....Know your school know your local market...plan on advancing your education sooner rather than later. Be aware that the global job market, especially for new grads, is pushing for a BSN.

    I wish you the best on your nursing journey
    poppycat and Meriwhen like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Can agree with some but not all of your post, however much would depend upon where one lives.

    Here in NYC if not NYS many hospitals long stopped hiring diploma grads, indeed there is only one such program in the entire state. The remaining hospital and or former diploma nursing schools now all offer ADN degrees. Even the old Saint Vinny's schools in Staten Island, and Queens long converted over to associate degrees. Saint Vincent's School of Nursing in Manhattan simply closed.

    With the "BSN preferred" trend at least for new hires going full tilt in NYC at the moment, I would never suggest anyone seeking to attend a nursing school in this area consider one (New Jersey still has a few), it is just too great a risk of not being hired post grad.

    For some reason the one city that seems to love their diploma nurses is Philadelphia, well at least there are still a good number of such programs located in that state.
    I think that's becoming a norm a lot of places, even though I think a diploma program is possibly tougher. There's one diploma program left where I used to live and when my mom was a patient at that hospital, those students worked their BUTTS off (not that any of us present and former students don't but this was incredible).

    If you have a BS already I'd recommend an ABSN - it might even be cheaper. My ABSN wasn't cheap as it was private, but its cost was almost comparable to the diploma program up the street!

    I will say when I doubted my ability to get into the ABSN program I knew my backup would be the diploma program, which had started to offer an AAS in conjunction with a local junior college. I already had a BS degree and knew both local universities had RN to MSN programs, so I wasn't too worried about advancement. Plus my mom went to a diploma program so I thought that added a cool factor. Seriously.

    I think I'd hate to see that diploma program go, but I think it's coming. Unless the AAS is preparation for them to merge for an ADN. I think the diploma programs are classic nursing in a way no other program is.
  9. 0
    I am a diploma RN from many moons ago.....I did college courses AT my nursing school, all my nursing courses were at the same school I took...Eng 1 and 2. Psych 1 and 2, Micro, socialogy, etc.....so am I closer to being an ADN due to that or just a Diploma Nurse?
  10. 0
    If you're asking what degree to go for, you ought to go RN-BSN. Or even RN-MSN.

    You've got college credits, but it's still a diploma. My mom in 1953 had the same thing - took science and chemistry/anatomy at what was back then The Norfolk Division of William and Mary in her diploma program at Norfolk General Hospital.

    Now they call it Old Dominion University.


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