BSN's vs. Community college - page 3

Hi all. I just wanted to say that nurses with BSN's in my opinion should be paid more, and have preference in the hiring process. In community college they basically pay you to go, and at a... Read More

  1. by   Energizer Bunny
    So, how about comparing credit hours for the two degrees for curiosity's sake? My program calls for 70 credit hours for the 2 year RN program. (they tend to suggest doing it in three years but I have to have full time status for my financial aid)
  2. by   rnmaven
    Quote from cottoncandyclouds
    Hi all.

    I just wanted to say that nurses with BSN's in my opinion should be paid more, and have preference in the hiring process. In community college they basically pay you to go, and at a University, you take on soooo many student loans. The upper division classes are much more difficult at a University and I truly feel it's unfair to group the two (BSN, and community) together. It's completley different. I have heard that there are some states that requrire a BSN if that's true, I think it's great.
    Bye for now.
    Here's my perspective on the whole education of nurses, pay, etc. (And you can check my profile..........my education is in nursing.)
    Compensation calculations should be based on pay for the "job description". If two people are handling a position (bedside nursing) and in essence doing the same job......they deserve the same pay. Now, within that pay grade, you could offer tiers that can be earned (clinical ladder type compensation) like national certifications, additional education, involvement in committees, mentoring of staff, etc. That is how bedside nurses should be paid.

    Now, on the issue of education overall.......here's my two cents. (And this is from a Diploma grad who now........27 yrs later is working on my MSN). Education is power and authority........if you think that the nursing profession can continue to have such varied levels of education and still achieve full professional credibility, you are only fooling yourself. In 1977 when I finished my Diploma program........finished with a A.A.S too.......it was different. If you want to be a nurse at the bedside......fine.....it didn't matter....that educational level was fine. Just as long as you pass the boards and get your RN. You can do that job forever. However, you find out very quickly that if you want flexiblity within your profession you need a degree. So I toiled for 6 yrs part time to get a BSN and when I finished.......I left the bedside. (except for per diem work) I went into pharmaceutical sales, medical sales and sales management and it was my BS degree that gave me that flexibility. If things were different within the profession, I might've stayed but overall, I felt that in order to gain some benefit from that 6 yrs of toil, I needed to see some kind of increase in pay to justify why I had even bothered to get the BSN. I wasn't ready to continue school for an MSN and I wasn't really interested in nurse clinician or management jobs. So I made the most of my degree and went into pharmaceutical sales.

    So education is key........if you don't want to be trapped in an aspect of any profession that you may love now but as you get older, you find that you need something else. Additionally, the greatest arguement I have heard for nurses continuing their education is the fact that the majority of allied health sciences (Physical Therapy, Pharmacy, etc) all require advanced degrees.......so again.........you have to look at how is nursing ever going to be viewed as a true profession unless we continue our education............and that's why I'm back in school! (Oh, and I work the nightshift 36 to 48 hrs a week........so don't think I don't know how hard everyone is working!)
    Last edit by rnmaven on Mar 23, '04
  3. by   Betty_SPN_KS
    I'm glad there are different options, and different levels, available. If I were fresh out of high school, I would like to go straight for a BSN. But I am 40, with a large family, so I'm starting with LPN. I had decided if I got into the LPN program, I would take it. If I didn't get into either the LPN or ADN program, I would continue working on pre-reqs for BSN. As it turned out, I got into the LPN program right away.
    As for why BSNs don't get higher pay than ADNs, and whether they should, I really don't know.
  4. by   frann
    I've been considering finishing my BSN for a while. i'll get paid 50 cents more. I work about 1000 hrs/yr so thats 500 dollars extra year.I may retire in say 15 years so thats 7,500 over 15 years. Not sure if it would make me a better nurse though. Kids are both in school now, but I don't really want to go back to school. No I think I will just enjoy life :hatparty:
  5. by   rnmaven
    Quote from Betty_SPN_KS
    I'm glad there are different options, and different levels, available. If I were fresh out of high school, I would like to go straight for a BSN. But I am 40, with a large family, so I'm starting with LPN. I had decided if I got into the LPN program, I would take it. If I didn't get into either the LPN or ADN program, I would continue working on pre-reqs for BSN. As it turned out, I got into the LPN program right away.
    As for why BSNs don't get higher pay than ADNs, and whether they should, I really don't know.
    Dear Betty,

    Good for you! You have at least begun the journey! I am all for people starting somewhere to get into the profession. The good thing about having varied options of education is that at least it allows a diverse group of people to get in. Try doing that on an MBA program or some other degree. However, that being said, nurses still need to understand that in order to raise the power of the profession overall, there needs to be higher educational levels dominating the profession. Log onto the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and look at a press release regarding education in nursing. The quote I pulled out for a research project states: Currently only 43% of the registered nursing workforce possesses baccalaureate, master's or doctoral degrees. Compounding the problem is the fact that very few nurses prepared in associate degree programs continue their education once they enter the workforce. http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Media/NewsR...AikenStudy.htm

    That statement is very true......once you start earning the money, it's hard to go back to school. Believe me.......since it was 20 years between completion of my BSN and starting the MSN program.......it's been PAINFUL! Writing papers, learning APA formats (YIKES!!!) and still paying bills, tuition, kid stuff and life in general.

    I applaude all of us who have continued the journey. In the long run we will benefit ourselves and the profession overall.
  6. by   ShelleyERgirl
    Quote from rnmaven
    Dear Betty,

    Good for you! You have at least begun the journey! I am all for people starting somewhere to get into the profession. The good thing about having varied options of education is that at least it allows a diverse group of people to get in. Try doing that on an MBA program or some other degree. However, that being said, nurses still need to understand that in order to raise the power of the profession overall, there needs to be higher educational levels dominating the profession. Log onto the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and look at a press release regarding education in nursing. The quote I pulled out for a research project states: Currently only 43% of the registered nursing workforce possesses baccalaureate, master's or doctoral degrees. Compounding the problem is the fact that very few nurses prepared in associate degree programs continue their education once they enter the workforce. http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Media/NewsR...AikenStudy.htm

    That statement is very true......once you start earning the money, it's hard to go back to school. Believe me.......since it was 20 years between completion of my BSN and starting the MSN program.......it's been PAINFUL! Writing papers, learning APA formats (YIKES!!!) and still paying bills, tuition, kid stuff and life in general.

    I applaude all of us who have continued the journey. In the long run we will benefit ourselves and the profession overall.
    RnMaven, thank you for your post, it totally explained the situation in a non-judgemental,non-confrontational way and that is truly refreshing... I am currently an ADN student (graduate in 6/05) and while that option is better for me at this time, I can totally understand your argument for furthering your education.
  7. by   alakaea
    I totally disagree. Course, that is because I'm going to a community college to be a RN. Sounds like you're just pissed you missed an grand opportunity to save money and time.:chuckle
  8. by   SFCardiacRN
    Our local state BSN program is great if you don't look at the NCLEX pass rate. BOOOOM!
  9. by   icugirl33
    I graduated from a BSN program in MAY 2005 and my school now has the highest passing rate in the state 97%. I have 5 and half months experience as a nurse and a couple of weeks ago decided that I wanted to tranfer to a specialty area. I applied, was interviewed within 3 days, and got the job on the spot. The second question out of the director's mouth was where did I go to school? My coworker with 10 years of nursing experience, 4 of which are on my old floor (telemetry) applied, interviewed with the same people and didn't get the job. She is an extremely nice woman and figured if I got the job, it should be a breeze for her, she was wrong. I don't think a BSN should get paid more for bedside nursing, but it does help you get off that floor a lot quicker.
    When my year comes up in June, I will be applying for a clinical manager job. Due to the fact by then I will be half way through an MSN program, I'm confident my lack of bedside nursing experience will not keep me from getting the job. I will play up my education. Therefore, education is never a waste. If your long term goal is not to be a bedside nurse, get your BSN and higher.
  10. by   SFCardiacRN
    My ASN instructors gave us anecdotal information on the high pass rates of ASN (95%) and the low pass rates of BSN (55%). I just reviewed the BON web site and found this to not be true. Excluding a couple of high performers and a couple of consistently low performers, First time pass rates are approximately 80% for both degrees. What is surprising is not the differences between schools but the differences in the same school from year to year. 20% is common place and even 40% can be found. How a school can have 100% one year and 60% the next is just bizarre! Though I'm comfortable with my ASN, I wish I'd gone for BSN. It is the preferred degree.
  11. by   cjcsoon2bnp
    Howdy y'all!

    Well I am a nursing student at a community college now going for my ADN but eventually I want to get my MSN. I think that nurses with BSN degrees should be payed more for their education. I don't think a large amount more since they are doing the same job but perhaps slightly more. I don't think having a BSN makes you a better nurse then an ADN. I think that education is only a portion of what makes you a capable nurse and shouldnt' be used to look down on those with less education then yourself. I know many physicians who have told me directly that they perfer to work with nurses from the local community college (not only because its a good school) but because at our community college most of the time is spend on practical clinical expericnce instead of paperwork and theories (like most of the 4 year BSN programs in our area are based upon.) Education like nursing, is a personal choice and different people are satisfied at different levels. I think its more important for nurses to be united together, no matter what education level, instead of being divided over the issue of pay.
  12. by   Daytonite
    Oh, I couldn't resist this one. Who resurrected this old thing? You guys should take a look at the two threads currently running on the Nursing Student General Discussion forum going on about the difference between ADN and BSN. They didn't even bring up the salary issue. They're still stuck on whether one or the other is a better nurse.

    To icugirl33. . .you go, girl! I say it all the time, education is never a waste. A BSN will take you boldly where you have always wanted to go before. Enjoy your new position.
  13. by   tmd76
    the OP said that community colleges "pay you to go", heh, I need some reimbursement somewhere. I have met some nurses that have a Master's and still don't know which way is up...and then I have met some with an Associates that are the best nurses you will ever meet...I am still a student, but I have worked in a doctor's office and just doing my clinicals...I think what you learn, not how long you go to school is what really matters, and actually applying it of course.

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