ASN or BSN?

  1. 0
    Here is my dilemma:

    I am 22. I already have a BA in sociology. I currently have 30k in student loan debt, but the payments are only $240/month.

    I am wondering what I should do: get a BSN or ASN? I am starting a CNA training program in January and will be working as a CNA during either program. Here are the pros and cons:

    BSN program: 15 months (accelerated), tuition for whole program will be $15,000, program has a 100% NCLEX pass rate. I probably would have to work part-time during the program due to intensity.

    ASN program: 24 months, tuition for whole program will be $5000, no clue about NCLEX pass rate (but I am pretty smart and graduated with my first BA in 3 years so I will study the hell out of that test), and I could probably work full time during the program because I already have A&P I and II done and will just need to do nursing classes since electives are done as well.

    Cost is better for the ASN, but time is better for the BSN. I am conflicted. I think monetarily I will be able to save up a lot of money doing the ASN, but I eventually want to be a NP so I am unsure of what to do, and I know the salary differences between an ASN and BSN isn't much. Thanks for any help!
  2. Get our hottest nursing topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    My $0.02? Go for the accelerated BSN... well, I would apply to both, but if accepted to both, I'd got for the BSN. You already know it had an excellent pass rate, so you can be pretty assured that it's a good program. You'll more than make up the extra $10K you'll spend in the 9 extra months you'll be working. And it will smooth the path to go on for the NP. A lot of MSN programs will allow you to apply with an RN and a bachelor's degree in another field, but it's a lot easier to not have to hunt those programs down, deal with the transcripts to figure out what BSN classes they're still going to make you take, etc.
  5. 0
    The BSN degree will enable you to have many more opportunities in nursing in the long run. In twenty years, your body might not tolerate the physical rigors of bedside nursing, so possessing the BSN degree will give you bargaining power when seeking a job away from the floor. Take a look at all of the employment advertisements, and you'll see all of the "BSN-preferred" postings for unique positions.
  6. 0
    I would do the BSN for sure and ONLY for 10k more? BSN definitely!! You can pay your debt once you become an RN and you don't have to worry about getting the BSN later.

    I wish I had a bachelor's in something so I can do the accelerated BSN. And I will be willing to pay 30k for it because that is how much that program cost here in Central New Jersey.

    Apply to ASN as well because nursing programs are VERY competitive and you may not be able to get in the other so at least you have a back up.

    Good luck,
    Angel
  7. 0
    Get your BSN now if your goal is to be a NP. You have to look at your goal. You're going to get a BSN anyway, so if you go ASN, you're going to need another 18 to 24 months to do an ASN to BSN program and spent an addition amount of money on that.

    Good luck!
  8. 0
    Go for the BSN cos of your future goal of being a NP.Since you'll make it in shorter time then,pass nclex, work and pay off your fees then move on with your goal.Though it's more expensive as it seems but if you think of it,its less expensive when you think of your aspiration in your nsg carrier.Apply for the ASN so that you dont have A,you'll go for B.Goodluck
    Azor
  9. 0
    Quote from jbeau
    Here is my dilemma:

    I am 22. I already have a BA in sociology. I currently have 30k in student loan debt, but the payments are only $240/month.

    I am wondering what I should do: get a BSN or ASN? I am starting a CNA training program in January and will be working as a CNA during either program. Here are the pros and cons:

    BSN program: 15 months (accelerated), tuition for whole program will be $15,000, program has a 100% NCLEX pass rate. I probably would have to work part-time during the program due to intensity.

    ASN program: 24 months, tuition for whole program will be $5000, no clue about NCLEX pass rate (but I am pretty smart and graduated with my first BA in 3 years so I will study the hell out of that test), and I could probably work full time during the program because I already have A&P I and II done and will just need to do nursing classes since electives are done as well.

    Cost is better for the ASN, but time is better for the BSN. I am conflicted. I think monetarily I will be able to save up a lot of money doing the ASN, but I eventually want to be a NP so I am unsure of what to do, and I know the salary differences between an ASN and BSN isn't much. Thanks for any help!
    Wow! That BSN program is a deal! I'm doing an accelerated program that's almost 50K just for tuition! Go for the BSN if you've got the choice. Or like the OP said, apply to both and see what you get. Some masters programs accept a previous bachelors degree and an RN license, for example UCSF school of nursing. Though with the BSN you'll get a wider option of programs to apply to b/c some programs do only accept BSNs. Also, if you want to work afterwards for a while, you can get tuition rembursement with some hospitals. I think the 15K is a good deal,
    J


Top