Am I making the right decision?!!

  1. 3
    Hello AN!,

    I just completed my first semester in my LPN program and graduate next August(hopefully lol). Once I graduate I wanted to work for a while and while working go back to school for my BSN, completely ignoring the ADN option because I want...no, will become a NP one day! I just really need to work and help out with my household but I also know if I stop, I won't go back. So am I going about school the right way or not? I need answers...Please! PN to BSN to MSN? Or PN to ADN to BSN to MSN?!
    Blanca R, Joe V, and JacobJason like this.
  2. Get our hottest nursing topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 16 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    A lot of that depends on you, your timetable, and your school.

    Do you have a previous degree? Will the BSN programs in your area accept LPN grads from your current school? Will the MSN programs admit students from the BSN bridge school?
  5. 2
    If money is not a factor, get your BSN as quickly as you can. It will make you more marketable as an RN. However, you'll likely find the BSN program more competitive and more expensive than an ADN program. If the goal is to start working as an RN as soon as possible to make more money, the LPN to ADN route will probably be your quickest and cheapest option.
    MsBruiser and Marshall1 like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from de2013
    A lot of that depends on you, your timetable, and your school.

    Do you have a previous degree? Will the BSN programs in your area accept LPN grads from your current school? Will the MSN programs admit students from the BSN bridge school?
    Im about 8 credits away from an Associate of Science but due to clinicals and life for the next two.semesters I wont be able to fulfill them until I graduate from the PN program. However, all my non-nursing courses will transfer to most schools in the state of SC. I believe Pharmacology is the only Nursing course that will transfer, but Im not sure.
  7. 0
    Quote from Ashley, PICU RN
    If money is not a factor, get your BSN as quickly as you can. It will make you more marketable as an RN. However, you'll likely find the BSN program more competitive and more expensive than an ADN program. If the goal is to start working as an RN as soon as possible to make more money, the LPN to ADN route will probably be your quickest and cheapest option.
    Thank you
  8. 3
    Oh yeah. Skip the ADN. It's not a prerequisite for a BSN program, and once you have your BSN you can decide what to do next. You'll have to have some sort of bachelor's degree to go to an MN program anyway, and they will look a lot more favorably on a BSN than a bachelor's in anything else, or an ADN. You go, girl!
    ChristineN, KelRN215, and Marshall1 like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from GrnTea
    Oh yeah. Skip the ADN. It's not a prerequisite for a BSN program, and once you have your BSN you can decide what to do next. You'll have to have some sort of bachelor's degree to go to an MN program anyway, and they will look a lot more favorably on a BSN than a bachelor's in anything else, or an ADN. You go, girl!
    Thanks for the advice and extra boost of confidence! Lol
  10. 0
    I wanted to start my RN career ASAP after my LPN. It didn't happen that way ofcourse. However, I chose the ADN route. It was the fastest and most convenient. Next stop is BSN. Debating about MSN, as I have no desire to be a NP.
  11. 0
    How long did it take you?
  12. 0
    If you can get the ADN in 2 classes (one semester), I'd go for that option. If you have the ADN and can sit for the NCLEX to be an RN, that will offer more options than being an LPN. If you can, take other courses towards your BSN at the same semester. Getting a BSN can take another 2 years or more depending on how you go about it (and I don't think you need to take the NCLEX again for BSN if you have the ASN, I could be wrong).


Top