ADN's being pushed out - page 14

by pammc000

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I work for a large Magnet hospital. As nursing becomes more popular, and nurses not in short supply, I have noticed something ominous has being going on lately. Several of our older and very seasoned ADN nurses are being fired.... Read More


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    However, only eight percent of hospitals in the USA employ magnet nurses. The four states: New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Florida, and California offer the most magnet hospital. They represent roughly 20 percent of the hospitals using the magnet program. They also are the hospitals using the most magnet nursing practices. The study had included almost 100,000 registered nurses-guess that gives some of us time to finish the BSN-some universities actually offer ADN to Masters program after a few solid nursing years...so far, its still a workable situation...
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    Sorry for not responding sooner. After having various schools review my transcripts, depending on the individual school, I was told I would still need between 33-47 credits. When I asked why I would need to take courses that I already had, their answer was that "our program requires it". I was told that there was nothing anyone in administration could do.

    Now I'll translate what they were really saying. "We won't make as much money by having you come in and take only the upper level nursing courses and giving you credit for what you've already done."

    I am not a naive kid. I am 50 and have spoken to colleges professors who readily admitted it's a business and that padding degree requirements is just one of the many ways four year schools scam students. I just glad it's starting to get national attention now with pressure put on government to stop pumping globs of money into four year schools. Every time they do, schools raise tuition.
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    Avenging spirit is passionate in his attitude. I thought you may be able to tell I'm a guy by the way I write. I only know one way; full force, head on and not being afraid to speak up. It's what got me through nursing school.
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    Sorry, I ASSumed you were a chick! LOL!
    nursel56 likes this.
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    Quote from avengingspirit1
    Sorry for not responding sooner. After having various schools review my transcripts, depending on the individual school, I was told I would still need between 33-47 credits. When I asked why I would need to take courses that I already had, their answer was that "our program requires it". I was told that there was nothing anyone in administration could do.

    Now I'll translate what they were really saying. "We won't make as much money by having you come in and take only the upper level nursing courses and giving you credit for what you've already done."

    I am not a naive kid. I am 50 and have spoken to colleges professors who readily admitted it's a business and that padding degree requirements is just one of the many ways four year schools scam students. I just glad it's starting to get national attention now with pressure put on government to stop pumping globs of money into four year schools. Every time they do, schools raise tuition.
    avengingspirit1, in your earlier posts you asserted you had already completed all the BSN nursing courses via your previous RN schooling. In this post it appears that you haven't completed all the BSN nursing courses as you stated "We won't make as much money by having you come in and take only the upper level nursing courses and give you credit for what you've already done." If the schools have determined that you haven't completed all the upper level nursing courses based on your diploma nursing program, I don't see what they are doing wrong in telling you that you still need to complete them. Of course, if you have already taken all the general education courses in your previous business degree, i.e. a comparable college statistics class, and are also being told that you need to re-take them, then I understand why you feel that is unfair. But regardless, if you need a BSN it is your choice as to whether you do what is required to obtain one. I don't see any way around the situation.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on Mar 12, '13
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    LAMAR UNIVERSITY in texas will no longer have an ASN program, only BSN! and RN to BSN programs, the ASN current students will complete their program and be the last ASN graduates at that university. I learned this while applying in my RN to BSN program.
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    Thanks for your input but I have to follow my heart on this one. I have spoken with too many nurses as well as those who teach in 4 year schools and am convinced 100% that the BSN push like the pushes for higher degrees in other fields is one big money making scam for schools as well as healthcare institutions. A major network has expressed an interest in the story and if it goes ahead, they will also be doing their own investigations.

    The latest research put forth by a certain academic elitist from the Univ. of Penn. was so rife with bias and self-affirming validity that she cites herself as a reference in four of the first six footnotes. And this was supposed to pass for scholarly research! It is a insult to every working nurse's intelligence that this science fiction has been allowed to have been published.
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    Excuse me? I took my competency exam 20 years ago when I became a nurse. No way, no how should I be required to get a BSN or take another competency exam to remain a nurse. Grandfather ADN"s in period. Anything else is ridiculous.
    Absolutely. I'll take it one step further. All these academic elitists (who still want to believe most nurses are too naive to through their true intentions) who haven't treated a patient in over 10 years and have been spending their time spewing flawed and bias propaganda and trying to pass it off as scholarly research for their own gain should be required to take a competency exam to keep their licenses. In her latest published so-called research which came out last week; "More BSNs Means Lower Mortality Rates", Linda Aiken cites herself as a reference in 4 four of the first six footnotes. And this is supposed for scholarly, unbiased research? Talk about self-reference and elitism!
    nursel56 likes this.
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    I have been a nurse for 28 years and the research has always shown that lower nurse to patient ratios deliver better patient outcomes. If I have 8-10 patients on a night shift I can only do what I can do. Some patients will get neglected in some ways. It doesn't matter what degree I have. Our employers know this and a large percentage of them don't care. Go to a smaller community hospital and see what is being practiced there. BSN or no BSN the ratios are generally high. Where is the research proving or disproving this?
    brandy1017, gummi bear, and sallyrnrrt like this.
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    Quote from Rnandsoccermom
    I have been a nurse for 28 years and the research has always shown that lower nurse to patient ratios deliver better patient outcomes. If I have 8-10 patients on a night shift I can only do what I can do. Some patients will get neglected in some ways. It doesn't matter what degree I have. Our employers know this and a large percentage of them don't care. Go to a smaller community hospital and see what is being practiced there. BSN or no BSN the ratios are generally high. Where is the research proving or disproving this?
    IIRC there is research out there and may have posted links that address the realtion between nurse/patient ratios and outcomes or adverse actions. Methinks this research is used to support mandated staffing levels by those pushing for such things. Unions representing nurses in many recent labour disputes/contract renewals also cite staffing ratio research in their push to have that issue addressed.

    Safe Staffing | Nursing Practice Issues | NYS Nurses Association
    nursel56 likes this.


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