ADN vs. BSN for Entry Level Nursing - page 8

The new push is for all nurses to be baccalaureate prepared, eliminating the 2 year associate degree program. Given the current and future nursing shortage, what is your opinion?... Read More

  1. Visit  buddhak0n profile page
    0
    Quote from Nelly0602
    My head is spinning :spin: after reading through some of the posts regarding ADN vs. BSN. I am seeking a bit of advice here. I am 30 years old with a B.A. in Journalism and a successful career in medical device sales. I am debating between an accelerated BSN program (16 months- and a lot more money) and a 4 semester nursing program (but I already have all the prerequisites completed through my B.A.- so is it just a one year program for me??) I am just beginning to research this career path so bear with me here. I am considering nursing because I like the idea of having a flexible schedule and the ability to work on a contractual basis. I am starting to think about having a family and I am not sure that I can be a full-time mommy-money and sanity wise! A career in nursing would allow me to work as I choose while kids are young, and perhaps return to medical sales (a lot more marketable to boot) at a later date. So for my purposes...
    Does a 1-2(?) program in nursing allow me the same career options as a BSN pay-wise/responsibility (particularly in the first 5 years or so?) or put another way, will a BSN be worth the time and money given my intentions? Thanks for any help or suggestions!

    Hey it's just my two cents but take the FASTEST path to a RN which would be the ADN program and THEN after you get yourself in the door of a Hospital or whatever facility you wish to work.. MOST of them have continuing Education programs whereby if you work there they will PAY to complete your education.. So the question is do you want to go back to school and just study for two more years , in which case you'll probably never want to actually work in the field .... or do you want to get a job and WORK?

    Just my two cents not meant to be anything but what it is... an opinion
  2. Visit  SFriscan profile page
    1
    I personally would have pursued an Associates degree if I was not accepted to a BSN program for the simple passion of wanting to be a nurse. I doubt anyone here is downplaying the intellect of ADN's. I know many nurses who graduated from a University with a bachelor's in hand, before pursuing a second degree in nursing.
    I think people are comparing nursing to other professions, such as physicians. A PhD is required, nothing more nothing less. So should a Bachelor's be a minimum requirement and expected fulfillment to attain from all nurses? An Occupational therapist was required a minimal education of Bachelor's but in 2007 has changed to a Masters. It seems to me many of us are concerned about how other professions view nursing and though their input is important, how are we as nurses valuing ourselves?
    The answer should be through continued education, which is already mandated by law. I think what would ease my mind as well as everyone on here is to continue bridging the gap and creating the pathway for ADNs to ease into a BSN degree while simultaneously working. The skill is already there, but to apply theory and place the critical thinking skills gained from a bachelor's education into practice puts the whole perspective of patient care under a different light. So of course I value higher education but as long as there is an easier route, people will take it. A Bachelor's at Yale is the same as a Bachelor's at a 4-yr college, but an Associates should not be under the same category or expected to receive the same treatment as a Bachelor's when we compare nursing in context of licensure, pay rate, and so forth.
    ADNs no longer care for only stable patients, so times have changed and if your really concerned about the direction of nursing, then be active. A forum is not going to change anything, unless you allow it to open your mind, accept criticism, and put the opinions of others to good use. In the business world, no formal degree put the person to the top, continuous training and experience did, so there. You can argue that against me. Good night.
    lindarn likes this.
  3. Visit  dianacs profile page
    2
    Quote from SFriscan
    I think people are comparing nursing to other professions, such as physicians. A PhD is required, nothing more nothing less.
    Getting on the soapbox...physicians have a medical doctorate (or a DO). This is a clinically-focused doctorate. A PhD is an academic/research-oriented doctorate. Two different things. Off the soapbox now.
    Tragically Hip and lindarn like this.
  4. Visit  RossayRN profile page
    0
    Just wanted to point out that all 4 year programs do not get the summers off as state by previous poster. I am in a BSN program and I have to go straight through for 2 years including summers! I don't get a break. I go to Chicago State University.
  5. Visit  elkpark profile page
    0
    Quote from buddhak0n
    Hey it's just my two cents but take the FASTEST path to a RN which would be the ADN program and THEN after you get yourself in the door of a Hospital or whatever facility you wish to work.. MOST of them have continuing Education programs whereby if you work there they will PAY to complete your education.. So the question is do you want to go back to school and just study for two more years , in which case you'll probably never want to actually work in the field .... or do you want to get a job and WORK?

    Just my two cents not meant to be anything but what it is... an opinion
    Just to clarify, for those who already have a BA or BS, an ADN program is not necessarily the fastest route to RN licensure, now that there are so many accelerated BSN programs for people with other baccalaureate degrees ...

    However, everyone's situation is different, and you can't just assume that an accelerated BSN is your best best, either. Best to talk to folks at all the nursing (RN) programs in your area and see what they have to offer you, and carefully consider all the variables (time frame, expense, etc.) in relation to your personal situation.
  6. Visit  fly4rfun profile page
    1
    when I went to nursing school(years ago) the bsn students could take their board exam after the 2nd year. we took our board exam after our 2nd year.
    If I had to do it over again I would get my BSN, would it make me a better nurse, no,
    but might open more doors of certain jobs. I think what the BSN student takes after the 2nd year is statistics, public health, ect. the core nursing appears the same.

    I also know to many BSN nurses who cant do critical thinking. exceptions to all.
    your advanced degrees wont make you a good nurse, neither being a ADN, its individual
    RNGrad2006 likes this.
  7. Visit  RNGrad2006 profile page
    0
    Quote from fly4rfun
    when I went to nursing school(years ago) the bsn students could take their board exam after the 2nd year. we took our board exam after our 2nd year.
    If I had to do it over again I would get my BSN, would it make me a better nurse, no,
    but might open more doors of certain jobs. I think what the BSN student takes after the 2nd year is statistics, public health, ect. the core nursing appears the same.

    I also know to many BSN nurses who cant do critical thinking. exceptions to all.
    your advanced degrees wont make you a good nurse, neither being a ADN, its individual
    That is so true!!!! We have many (actually the majority of our RN's have their BSN) and many do not seem to have the critical thinking that you would think is required...actually one I am surprised even passed through Nursing...like you say it is individual!!!!
  8. Visit  nursenancy64 profile page
    1
    I am very interested in this topic. I started my career as an LPN. Then I went back to school and got an ASN. I have worked as an RN for 8 years and I finished my BSN in 2008. I did not get a raise or any type of recognition at work at all. I am now in the process of getting my MSN in nursing and plan to teach at the ADN level. I believe that all nurses should get at least a BSN to be recognizes as professional. In fact, I do not think the ADN programs are really just ADN programs but teach almost as much in 2 years as the 4 year university programs. you do not get the prestige and the profession does not get any respect because it is a junior college education only. MD's think we are undereducated and really do not respect nurses as they should. I agree that pay should be increased when education does but perhaps the ADN level of nursing should be a stepladder program which gives you license to work as a nurse and get experience yet requires you to obtain a BSN in 10 years. Then upon getting the BSN you should also get a raise of 2-5 bucks an hour. It makes sense and it forwards the profession! You even need a 4 year degree to teach kindergarten guys! What we do is very valuable and requires critical thinking everyday. I know experience is great too but my education has been invaluable.
    Thanks for hearing my thoughts. I have been in all the positions in nursing and understand what all of you are saying. I was discouraged too from going on but I am glad now that I did despite the lack of increased wages. It is worth it.
    Tuition reimbursement should also be given by hospitals in greater amounts of money.
    http://img.an-file.info/smilies/nurse.gif
    cyrahot likes this.
  9. Visit  FloGabi profile page
    1
    I feel conflicted answering this question because I graduated from a very good BSN program and I teach in a very good ADN program. In comparing the two programs, I feel that I made the right choice for myself. My BSN program had a lot more theory classes (such as separate courses on nutrition, interpersonal communication, nursing research, caring, and pathophysiology), more hand-on practice in the lab (in comparison to the class I teach), and a semester long preceptor ship program). We spent several weeks on physical assessments alone. As a practicing nurse, I use my BSN foundation to help me find solutions to many situations that come up for my patients.

    At my current position, I make every attempt to teach my ADN students to critically think, to apply theory into practice and to develop strong basic nursing foundation. However, I find it very challenging because many of my students did not take the additional courses that would assist my students to better understand and apply theory into practice. My ADN students have to learn so much nursing content in such a fast pace that true learning may not take place. Many of my students are forced to memorize rather than understand and thus, make it difficult to retain and utilize that information. In my BSN program, there were layers (basic to complex) that were threaded in the curricullum that allowed concepts to repeated frequently in the program that eventually lead me to make connections between theory and practice. My ADN students have a lot of hands-on clinical hours to practice nursing skills, but I worry that my students do not have enough time to link theory into practice.

    If anyone is teaching at a BSN program, please comment on your observation.
    lindarn likes this.
  10. Visit  FloGabi profile page
    1
    Did the ADN to BSN program helped you be a better RN? What specific things did your BSN program teach an experienced RN such as yourself? Thank you for your response.
    lindarn likes this.
  11. Visit  lovelyx3 profile page
    0
    In my opinion, ASN is perfect for those who just want to become a nurse. For those who want to continue their career in management BSN is for you. Personally I do not care for an management position because I am a hands on kind of girl. To each their own.
  12. Visit  Unsunghero profile page
    0
    FloGabi- what BSN program did you attend? I am looking into BSN programs in CA.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close