ADN vs. BSN for Entry Level Nursing - page 4

by pattycakebaby

55,123 Views | 102 Comments

The new push is for all nurses to be baccalaureate prepared, eliminating the 2 year associate degree program. Given the current and future nursing shortage, what is your opinion?... Read More


  1. 0
    These types of threads remind me of when you're watching a horror movie with a mad slasher hiding in a closet. For some reason, someone always feels the need to look in the closet, and you find yourself yelling, "NOOOOO!!! Don't open that door!!!"

    NOOOO!!! Don't look at this thread!!!
  2. 0
    Quote from PersistantLeader
    I agree with you on that... I had another username and had trouble with the same person you did, don't listen to negativity... I didn't. Pay attention to the sincere good advice. You seem like a good willed person and you will succeed in life if you follow your heart and intuition.
    I really hope you're not referring to caroladybelle. She is the last person here who would attack/harrass anyone. Just because she states her opinion directly and that opinion happens to differ from your does not mean she's attacking you.

    And there have been about 50,000 million threads on this subject. A simple search would take you to some very recent ones.

    So, I guess now I'm a bad guy, too.
  3. 0
    I started off as a LPN and worked 8 years as one. Went back and got my RN-ADN and now I am looking into getting my MSN. As a LPN I did the same work as a RN in LTC but learned later on that is not the case in a hospital setting, where a RN was responsible for my patients. The bottom line is that, nursing as a profession only improves with higher education but also too, a BSN is NOT responsible for an ADNs patients. Both are RNs.
  4. 0
    Boy have I changed my mind about this in the last several years.

    I have a BSN, and until recently always believed it was the only tru way to be a nurse. That being said, I now believe ADN programs are a great way for nurses to get started. If I had to make recommendations it would be start with the ADN, get some maturity, you can take online classes for ADN to BSN or even ADN to MSN now which are fully accredited programs.
    By the way, I am working on my MSN and I am trying to get a position teaching ADN nursing.
    Good luck,
  5. 0
    Quote from bsweilrn
    Boy have I changed my mind about this in the last several years.

    I have a BSN, and until recently always believed it was the only tru way to be a nurse. That being said, I now believe ADN programs are a great way for nurses to get started. If I had to make recommendations it would be start with the ADN, get some maturity, you can take online classes for ADN to BSN or even ADN to MSN now which are fully accredited programs.
    By the way, I am working on my MSN and I am trying to get a position teaching ADN nursing.
    Good luck,
    This is the route I will be taking--Getting my ADN, then eventually getting my BSN someday!
    I think it's GREAT that you are working on your MSN! Congrats!
  6. 0
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA

    Every ADN program must 'partner' with a BSN program, either University or on-line. Every graduate of the ADN program, just like now, is eligible to sit NCLEX and be RN.
    This is exactly what my school does currently. I'm in the AAS Nursing program and it transitions into the RN-to-BSN program with no further application, etc. In essence, it is a 4-year BSN program with the opportunity to get your license and start working half-way through. As a "returning" student to school, I could not, in any way, afford to take a 4 year leave from working to go to school full-time and a part-time BSN program would have taken me until retirement to complete. This way, I can deal with full-time school/no-or-little working for two years, then get a job and continue my education part-time. Of course there are those who will consider me a second-class nurse until that point (such as the clinical instructor who told our AAS class that BSN students were smarter than us) but that's their problem, not mine.
  7. 0
    I just graduated from a 4 year BSN program. One thing I keep seeing on this website is how BSN's lack the bedside experience that ADN's have.

    I don't know about other programs, but I think we had a lot of time at the bedside.

    The first semester we did all the skills in a skills lab and went up on the floor a few times to get our feet wet, no real major bedside time. For 2 semesters, I did clinicals 12 hours a week for 14 weeks (168 hrs/semester). For 1 semester I did 12hrs/week for 14 weeks in Critical Care Units and 6 hours/wk for 14 weeks of Mental Health Nursing clinicals in the hospital. For my final semester, I was required to complete 220 hours with a preceptor for my preceptorship (I did mine on a cardiac tele floor).

    Is my program unique or do other BSN programs have over 1,000 hours at the bedside as well?
  8. 0
    I think it's very nice that there are numerous ways to get an RN and I think it depends on the individual's situation what is best for them. The person who has more time, then the BSN would be good. For the person who has to get out there working as quick as possible, doesn't have the time or funds, then the Associates is the way to go for them. I personally need to take awhile getting through my pre-reqs so my husband & I can save for when I start the actual nursing program so I think I'm going to do the BSN since I have the time to do it.
  9. 1
    I love this site!!! Now that I have that out of the way, I want to chime in on the subject of BSN vs.ADN. One poster was absolutely correct in saying that this is a hot topic for those of us just entering the profession. I weighed both BSN programs and ADN programs heavily. I canít speak to all programs, but in Chicago the main difference in the two were the additional humanities and liberal arts courses required- well that and maybe a few more semesters of Chemistry. I have a BA and will have an MA soon. I will be starting an ADN program in the fall and for me getting a BSN would have made no sense. Most of the additional courses required (with the exception of higher level Chemistry) I would have already had in one of my two programs. One poster suggested that those of us who possess a BA in another subject along with an ADN should not be given the same credit as those with a BSN. I strongly disagree. If I have the necessary science courses/nursing courses and the same humanities/ lib arts courses then I want the same degree of respect and consideration. Keep in mind that those of us who come to the table with degrees in other areas have a very valuable perspective. My BA in Communications has helped me tremendously in dealing with all kinds of people from various backgrounds. My MA in Gerontology has been invaluable in teaching me about hospice, Medicare/Medicaid, care planning, social services and government policies regarding aging. I would strongly challenge anyone who suggests that my other degrees coupled with an ADN would not warrant the same respect and recognition as a BSN.
    DisneybearRN likes this.
  10. 0
    For the seasoned nurses and longtime posters, a little patience please. Those of us new to nursing and the boards would like to put in our input/opinions. It may be a dead horse to you, but you do always have the option of not reading these posts. I for one am still very interested in the subject. thank you vicki for posting all the relevant sites. that was much more helpful than the harangue I received at one point from someone who did not wish me to waste her time on something that has been gone over and over again. As a new nurse, these debates are still interesting to me. Seriously, the horse may be dead, but in that case, a little more talk isnt going to kill it then, will it? Also, as a new nurse with two small children, a house, a husband and not to mention 2 dogs and a cat to take care of, my time is precious, and I dont always have time to hunt down all these previous threads. (Oh for the days of time to surf the net without feeling like I am stealing time away from all of the above, not to mention the continuous learning that goes with the new job!).
    Thanks so much for those of you with advice and posing threads that are relevant to our questions.
    KristyBRN


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