4 Years for A ADN?!

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    I learned recently that at my community college it will take me 3 to 4 years before I can get my degree. Because I have to start from scratch with my math, so is this a really long time? Should I go to a trade college to save some time? Or should I hold out? I know this is my decision but what would you do?
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

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    It took me 4 years to get my "2-year" degree. I don't regret a single minute of it.

    Hope this helps.
    pumpkin1984 likes this.
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    Referring to ADNs as "two year" degrees is really a misnomer, because, while they do typically consist of two years (full-time) of nursing courses, the prerequisitie courses necessary to qualify for the nursing program typically take one to two years to complete. So, most people take 3-4 years to complete an ADN degree.

    If you decide to go the "trade school" route, be v. cautious about what you're getting into. The private-for-profit schools tend to be much more expensive than state schools (community colleges or state universities), and some (not all) are outright scams.
    pumpkin1984 likes this.
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    Since you have to start from scratch with Math and other things, the requirements are going to be the same somewhere else unless you can test out. I don't think it will be 4 years of full time work though, you can take some of the other pre-req an co-req courses like Psych. or Soc. can't you?

    If you can get into a BSN program that would probably be better since it will take 4 years. Good luck.
  7. 1
    Quote from pumpkin1984
    I learned recently that at my community college it will take me 3 to 4 years before I can get my degree. Because I have to start from scratch with my math, so is this a really long time? Should I go to a trade college to save some time? Or should I hold out? I know this is my decision but what would you do?
    I didn't know what I was doing when I enrolled at Stevens-Henager college in Utah. It's a vocational/trade school. I am in an allied health program (for an A.A.S.), which, when I finish, I can go straight into their A.D.N. program. I don't have to take those heavy science courses as pre-reqs with the labs either! (Anatomy, Physio and Medical Micro) - because my school just does things differently. Wow I'm so lucky!!

    NOT!

    I just recently found out that my 'trade' school, Stevens-Henagers nursing program is not nationally certified. (I didn't know they needed to be NLN certified). It's got some state accreditation which will not qualify me to be a Nurse/Officer in the military. So my whole plan just went out the window and I'm stuck in my Allied Health A.A.S program otherwise I'd owe them all kinds of money if I dropped out to return to community college to take those 3 science classes that I need for REAL nursing school.

    MORAL: Don't take shortcuts or you will end up screwed my like me.

    If I was going to only practice nursing in Utah then the school would be perfectly acceptable but that's not my plan. But I feel your pain. I also need to get a lot of math done. I got to intermediate algebra and dropped the class. So I need all 3 science pre-reqs, possibly a chem class, and Intermediate Algebra. Some schools have even more pre-reqs, like a nutrition class. None of the classes I am taking at my trade school will transfer. I will get credit for my degree will but it won't take the place of any of those classes.
    Last edit by kristie_b1 on Jan 22, '08 : Reason: Added more info
    elkpark likes this.
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    I'm finishing up my pre-requisites (part time, since I'm a poor working girl). The last of my prerequisites that I need after finishing my Associates in Business Management will take me 3 semesters (1 full year - spring/summer/fall), and then I've got probably another 2 year after that of taking the nursing requirements part time to get my ADN.

    This is at the local community college, and while it's going to take some time, I know eventually I'll appreciate the education. Just wish I were closer to being finished with it.

    Who'd have thought after I got the 1st degree that I'd change my mind and move on to something completely different?? :selfbonk:
  9. 0
    We had a 5 semester RN program in Tallahassee, FL that was amazing. Pre-req's were non-negotiable- but when we realized what the nursing coursework was going to be like, we were pretty glad to already have that stuff out of the way. It seemed like it made it much easier for us to focus on the "good stuff". I work on L&D now and am considering going back for my BSN and MSN- becuse I want to teach. There is no difference in our hospital between RN, BSN, and MSN unless you want to go into management. I would keep in touch with the Board of Nursing in whatever state you plan to practice.
    Good Luck!!
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    I was older (read: couldn't test out of anything) and it took me 5 years for my RN degree. Once the pre-reqs are complete, you may find that you can't get INTO the RN program due to space limitations. That is when I took all the psch, philosophy etc. courses. So, 2 years of nursing, 2 years of pre-reqs and one just trying to get into the program! But, having done it this way I managed to graduate magna cum laude. Since I didn't have to take the nursing with other courses I could really concentrate on the class at hand and ended up with the good grades.
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    By the time I graduate next year, I will have attended school year-round for three years. Not all of it has been full time, but three years from start to finish for an AAS.
  12. 1
    Quote from pumpkin1984
    I learned recently that at my community college it will take me 3 to 4 years before I can get my degree. Because I have to start from scratch with my math, so is this a really long time? Should I go to a trade college to save some time? Or should I hold out? I know this is my decision but what would you do?
    I just finished in May with my ASN/ADN and I'm still kicking myself. It's taken me a longtime too (2003-2007) and I had a previous degree. My suggesstion, do all you prereqs. on the com. college level and transfer over to the BSN. My BSN bound friends complained about the endless papers they had to write, while I was up to ears in clinicals. I thought I would be better prepared; apparently, with the BSN they will give you a chance to catch up without the clinical experience. BSN you've got way more opportunities. Everytime, I read BSN preferred I just want to scream, which is often. Goodluck to you!!!
    Misslady113 likes this.


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