I'm a nurse. Not a housekeeper! - page 5

Ok, let me start by saying that I do not feel that I am above cleaning someone elses house. Since I have started with this last client I have already cleaned their bathrooms, washed the walls... Read More

  1. by   lsvalliant
    I used to do my patients laundry because he would soil several outfits a day with his short bowel sydrome. Sometimes I would clean the area that I was sitting in just for peace of mind because the house was so disgusting and I was getting sick alot. I would sanitze counter tops, railings, and door knobs for my own benefit, never the clients. Other than that type of cleaning, I would say NO. Dont DO It!
  2. by   Jenn55e
    Quote from lsvalliant
    I used to do my patients laundry because he would soil several outfits a day with his short bowel sydrome. Sometimes I would clean the area that I was sitting in just for peace of mind because the house was so disgusting and I was getting sick alot. I would sanitze counter tops, railings, and door knobs for my own benefit, never the clients.
    I find myself cleaning and sanitizing the areas that I work in often, just from my own habits. This is so that I can work in a clean, safe, and sanitized environment to care for the client. I would hope this keeps my client and myself from getting sick.
  3. by   lsvalliant
    Quote from Jenn55e
    I find myself cleaning and sanitizing the areas that I work in often, just from my own habits. This is so that I can work in a clean, safe, and sanitized environment to care for the client. I would hope this keeps my client and myself from getting sick.
    Of course I dont want my patient to get sick. I meant I'm not doing the cleaning to benefit the parents. Surprisingly, no one in the house was really getting sick except for me. I think their just immune to whatever germs they have been living in for so long.
  4. by   nursel56
    I got sick a lot when I started, just like I did as a new grad at CHLA. Once your body adjusts (in my case anyway) I was fine. My patient rarely got sick even though some of the caregivers small children would climb all over with their hands not washed.

    However she would get royally ****** off if we shooed them away. She loved having the little kids near by. To me this is just an example of the difference and the sensitivities you need to have in private duty.

    Me -- I draw the line at cockroaches! I loathe those things. I'm still skeeved out by a nurse who wrote a post about how the roaches at one place would actually drop from the ceiling into her hair. I'd rather have bees. Or ants.
  5. by   mb1949
    Ok how about this, patient has an older sibling under 5, mom thougt she was slick, would go out for milk and disappear for 2 hours, once for the whole day, that was it, I am not a nanny, and honestly if medicaid did an impromptu visit, I would get in trouble, this is not what I am getting paid for, I am paid to give skilled nursing care. Period
  6. by   SDALPN
    We provide hospital level care in the home. When was the last time you did laundry while working in a hospital? Or dishes? Yeah, thought so.

    We are there to be nurses. If they want a maid or a babysitter, they can hire one. Just like the rest of the world has to do. We aren't gardeners either (had a patient that wanted the nurses to take care of her garden).
  7. by   tothepointeLVN
    Quote from tankity
    I look at it like this:
    At my private-duty case, I'm getting paid more to take care of ONE patient on a vent than I ever made taking care of multiple patients on a vent unit and running around like a headless chicken.
    This situation is uncommon at least in the city I live in. PDN in general pays the least out of all the options out there for LVN's. The job is usually done by new grads because experienced nurses seldom can afford to take the pay cut.
  8. by   ArwenEvenstar
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    This situation is uncommon at least in the city I live in. PDN in general pays the least out of all the options out there for LVN's. The job is usually done by new grads because experienced nurses seldom can afford to take the pay cut.
    Yeah! Private duty (through agency) is low pay nursing around here too. I'm a RN. I took a 40% pay cut from the hospital when I made the switch. And, at the hospital I was at, you always got a yearly raise. In the 4 yrs of private duty, I never got a raise. So the pay difference only got worse with time!! I was willing to take the pay cut for less stress. But after several yrs, private duty got to me to - family drama, nurse's lacking professional boundaries causing all kinds of trouble, etc.

    I also agree with another response (nurse156) that pay is not the point here, nor is it about "sitting around" when you could be helping the family clean. It is about being a professional nurse. I found out that if you gave an inch, the families tended to take a mile! I would keep the PATIENT'S area clean, and do cleaning RELATED to the patient's equipment and such. But nothing for the family at all. It is too easy to get sucked in...and soon you are doing all kinds of things for the FAMILY, and the patient is being neglected. Or you have lost objectivity and do not even realize it. I saw things spiral out of control very quickly in private duty. Focus on the nursing care!
    Last edit by ArwenEvenstar on Oct 30, '11
  9. by   dirtyhippiegirl
    Bump.

    I've been doing PDN since June and had my first obligated housekeeper duties.

    Actually, REALLY nice family. I was doing a twelve hour overnight. Mom's like "hey, here's some clothes if you want to fold and put away and some bottles to wash. But only if you want to! I know a lot of my overnight nurses ask for things to do so..."

    Had kind of a hard shift with the baby (my first real young one -- I usually do toddlers, which I love. Babies are hard!) I washed the bottles that I used, plus his breathing tx stuff, etc. Mom comes in about an hour before my shift ends and is like "please wash the baby's bottles before you go off." So I end up washing probably two day's worth of baby bottles for my patient, PLUS his (normal) twin's bottles. Which, normally I wouldn't mind doing, but mom knew I'd had a difficult night. On top of which, mom made it sound like the extra bottles in the sink were baby X's ---) they weren't, they were his twin brothers' bottles, who does not need nursing care.
  10. by   tothepointeLVN
    I don't ask for extra things to do overnight I knit. It's a traditional private duty nurse thing to do, easy to watch the patient and keep hands busy. Plus the families usually like it. Probably makes me seem older, more centered, mature. Plus I always hook them with this line for hospice. I like to knit while sitting at the bedside that way when I wear what I knitted I can remember your loved one. =D
  11. by   dirtyhippiegirl
    I can't knit! I've tried but I'm terribly uncoordinated. I bring a book and even a tiny little book-light if they insist on no lights in the kiddo's room. (I prefer one so that I can see them, but whatevs.)

    You're right 'tho that knitting is SO very PDN.
  12. by   nursel56
    I knit too! -- . Everybody seems to be delighted to see that and will often launch into a story or their own and ask questions etc - the funnest one of all was when a very elderly relative of a patient who grew up in Havana started talking about their home life in Cuba and how she knit a lot of vests for the men and sleeveless sweaters. Her sister knit super-complicated tablecloths and stuff. She actually got herself a knitting project going after years of not knitting.

    After all these years she did not use a pattern or diagram.

    I can't crochet to save my life though. All thumbs with that.
  13. by   dirtyhippiegirl
    ^I was told that crocheting is easier if you can't knit.

    I can't do either, but I can latch-hook.

    /ducks.

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