What to start studying for A&P 1?

  1. 0
    As i'm getting ready for the new semester. I'm not to sure where to start with A&P 1. I will be taking it with human development. My questions is for those of you who have taken it or are going to be taking it. Where did you start? Any youtube videos that are the best? I'm sorry my questions are everywhere but I want to do very well in this class and of course all my others.
  2. Get our hottest student topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 13 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I'm entering into the same class as well.if your a visual learner I know it's a a&p coloring book, so u can kindve color and see the parts and what's what.i had one for microbiology and it was nice to go to that and kindve have a better visual, so I think I'm going to purchase this one also. It's on Amazon but I have the same questions as u. Goodluck
  5. 0
    Hi! Its hard to say where to start exactly..in my class she had us review basic biology (cell respiration ect) and basic chemistry. But then she found out we were the only anatomy class doing that on campus and basically cut us off from review randomly haha! Some teachers jump right in! The first "anatomy" things we learned about were about integumentary system. Layers of skin, what they do, special features ect. But I'm not sure if everyone starts there. If you do decide to do do pre-studying, focus on the big picture! Different teachers choose different small things to learn about to throw you off
  6. 0
    There are a lot of great A&P threads if you do a search here. It's hard to say what to study first because I think every class is structured differently. In my class we did basics/body positions, tissues, integumentary system, nervous system, skeletal system, and muscle system in that order. Before it started I read the first two chapters in my textbook. I'd suggest doing body positions and tissues if you want to get a jump. We also did some basic chemistry concepts so if you haven't taken that course yet, reading that chapter could be a help as well.

    I did a little bit of coloring in the anatomy coloring book mentioned above, but I figured out that it was more helpful as a supplement to things I had already read or learned about in class. It's hard to understand much just by coloring it with no previous knowledge of the subject.

    Someone here pointed me to this site:
    Web Anatomy: Self Tests
    The quizzes there are SUPER helpful, but again, it will supplement what you learn in lab and lecture. For cell division, I watched the "mitosis rap" on youtube (very cheesy, but I will never forget the stages of mitosis...ever, thanks to that goofy song)

    In the beginning I used Quizlet (a free iPhone app) to make flash cards on my phone and studied them for 20 minutes before bed. I didn't have the time to make my own cards as the class progressed, but you can search other people's sets and study from them. I just saved the sets and deleted any cards that I didn't think I was responsible for knowing.

    As general advice: read every chapter before you're lectured on it if you can. Set aside one hour a day with no distractions and go over new material and old material. The information isn't difficult to understand, but the volume of it can be really overwhelming. If you know your learning style, taylor your studying to it. I'm a visual/kinesthetic learner so I drew a lot of pictures, took pictures of the professor's notes on the board, and did everything I could to get into the lab on days I had class to look at the models. A girl in my class was more auditory so she recorded the lectures and downloaded mp3s of the chapter reviews. If you find some people in your class that you get along with, form a study group. If you can't get a group together, talk out all the physiological processes to anyone who will listen (your family, your significant other, your dog) Good luck!
  7. 0
    I guess I stated that wrong but I used my micro coloring book for reviews after I learned certain things to get a visual
  8. 0
    A&P 1 will start off with the atom and build from there. You will study molecules, cells, cell division, how chemicals and proteins enter and exit the cell. Then you will learn how cells combine to make tissues, tissues combine to make organs, then you will study all of the organ systems. You will learn Homeostasis, how cells repair themselves, how you age, how your body heals, etc...

    Just remember that each new chapter builds off the previous one, so don't get behind.

    Also, you'll Lear terminology, direction, and various types of views or cuts. You'll need to learn all the muscles and bones. You will also need to know the various body cavities and their structures.

    Hope this helps :-)
  9. 0
    Khan Academy is a great free site... Lots of good videos that cover many different topics.
  10. 0
    Good day:

    http://allnurses.com/pre-nursing-stu...ml#post7656566 might be of help.

    Thank you.
  11. 0
    Endocrine system
  12. 0
    Google your class code plus 'syllabus'. You may find your instructors syllabus online.


    By the way, I like the new allnurses format. More aesthetically appealing.
    Was confused missing the search bar up top, but the new search is much improved.
    Last edit by dt70 on Dec 29, '13


Top